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Encyclopedia > Frederick Muhlenberg
Frederick Muhlenberg
Frederick Muhlenberg

In office
April 1, 1789March 4, 1791 (1st)
December 2, 1793 – March 4, 1795 (3rd)
Preceded by None; First in line (1st)
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. (3rd)
Succeeded by Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. (1st)
Jonathan Dayton (3rd)

Born January 1, 1750(1750-01-01)
Flag of the United States Trappe, Pennsylvania
Died June 4, 1801 (aged 51)
Flag of the United States Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Political party Pro-Administration Party
Anti-Administration Party
Profession Lutheran minister
Religion American Lutheranism

Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. A Delegate and a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania and a Lutheran pastor by profession, Muhlenberg was born in Trappe, Pennsylvania. Frederick A. C. Muhlenbers from the U.S. House of Representatives web site File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Dennis Hastert of Illinois, the current Speaker of the House (since January 6, 1999) The Speaker of the House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Jonathan Trumbull Jr. ... Jonathan Dayton (October 16, 1760–October 9, 1824) was an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Trappe is a borough located in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lancaster Founded 1730 Incorporated March 10, 1818 Government  - Mayor Rick Gray (D) Area  - City  7. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Pro-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the supporters of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the supporters of the... Anti-Administration Party is a term used by historians to describe the opponents of the policies of George Washingtons administration — especially Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamiltons financial policies — prior to the formation of the Federalist and Republican Parties; it is also sometimes used to describe the opponents of the... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that follows the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that follows the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Small earthquake in London, England April 4 - Small earthquake in Warrington, England August 23 - Small earthquake in Spalding, England September 30 - Small earthquake in Northampton, England November 16 – Westminster Bridge officially opened Jonas Hanway is the first Englishman to use an umbrella James Gray reveals her sex... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that follows the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... Trappe is a borough located in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. ...

Contents

Education and ministerial career

He attended the University of Halle, Germany, where he studied theology, and was ordained by the Pennsylvania Ministerium as a minister of the Lutheran Church on October 25, 1770. He preached in Stouchsburg, Pennsylvania, and Lebanon, Pennsylvania, from 1770 - 1774, and in New York City from 1774 - 1776. When the British entered New York at the onset of the American Revolutionary War, he felt obliged to leave, and returned to Trappe. He moved to New Hanover Township, Pennsylvania, and was pastor there and in Oley and New Goshenhoppen until August 1779. The Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg is located in the German cities of Halle, Saxony-Anhalt and Wittenberg. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Christian theology is reasoned discourse concerning... The Pennsylvania Ministerium was the first Lutheran church body in North America. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Battle of Chesma, by Ivan Aivazovsky. ... Lebanon, Pennsylvania, formerly known as Steitztown, is is the county seat of Lebanon County, PennsylvaniaGR6, United States. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about military actions only. ... New Hanover Township is a township located in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. ... Oley Township is a township in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ... Bally is a borough located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. ...


Political career

Muhlenberg was a member of the Continental Congress in 1779 and 1780, and served in the State house of representatives from 1780-1783 and was elected speaker November 3, 1780. He was a delegate to and president of the State constitutional convention in 1787 called to ratify the Federal Constitution. POOP HS;JHGF;JADHGJHASGHASJHGJSAHGJWJITHADHSGJHDASJLGFNKRA The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Elected to the First and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1789March 4, 1797), Muhlenberg was the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for the First Congress (1789-1791) and Third Congress (1793-1795). He did not seek renomination in 1796. is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... // Major events and legislation Senate and House of Representatives first convene (without quorum) in New York City, March 4, 1789 representing eleven States: Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia House first met with quorum to elect first Speaker, April 1... Independence Hall // The Third United States Congress was a meeting of the United States national legislature, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ...


Muhlenberg was also president of the council of censors of Pennsylvania, and was appointed receiver general of the Pennsylvania Land Office on January 8, 1800, and served until his death in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, on June 4, 1801. He was interred in Woodward Hill Cemetery there. After his death, the Township of Muhlenberg, Pennsylvania, was named for him. January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... Nickname: Location of Lancaster County in Pennsylvania Location of Lancaster in Lancaster County Country United States State Pennsylvania County Lancaster Founded 1730 Incorporated March 10, 1818 Government  - Mayor Rick Gray (D) Area  - City  7. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ...


Family

His father, Henry Muhlenberg, an immigrant from Germany, is considered the founder of the Lutheran Church in America. His brother, Peter, was a General in the Continental Army. Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (September 6, 1711, Einbeck, Germany – October 7, 1787) Trappe, Pennsylvania, originally Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was a Lutheran clergyman who is viewed as the founder of the Lutheran Church in the United States. ... Peter Muhlenberg Statue John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (October 1, 1746 - October 1, 1807) was a Clergyman, a Major General of the Continental Army, and a United States Senator and Congressman from Pennsylvania. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ...


Muhlenberg legend

There is an urban legend that because of Muhlenberg, German didn't become the second official language of the United States. At the heart of this legend is a vote in the United States House of Representatives from 1794, where a group of German immigrants asked for the translation of some laws into German. This petition was rejected by a 42-41 vote and Muhlenberg was later quoted as "the faster the Germans become Americans, the better it will be". An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ...


See also

Disambiguation: This article is about the language known as German as it is spoken in the United States. ...

External links

Preceded by
District Created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's At-large congressional district

1789 - 1791
alongside: George Clymer, Thomas Fitzsimons, Thomas Hartley, Thomas Scott, Henry Wynkoop, Daniel Hiester and Peter G. Muhlenberg

1791 - 1793
alongside: Thomas Fitzsimons, Thomas Hartley, Israel Jacobs, John W. Kittera, Daniel Hiester, William Findley, and Andrew Gregg
1793 - 1795
alongside: Thomas Fitzsimons, John W. Kittera, Thomas Hartley, Thomas Scott, James Armstrong, Peter G. Muhlenberg, Andrew Gregg, Daniel Hiester, William Irvine, William Findley, John Smilie, and William Montgomery The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Map of Pennsylvania, depicting its congressional districts since the 108th Congress. ... During the first three United States Congresses, Pennsylvania did not use congressional districts. ... George Clymer (March 16, 1739–January 23, 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father. ... Thomas Fitzsimons (1741-1811) was an American merchant and statesman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Hartley (September 7, 1748–December 21, 1800) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from York, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Scott was an American representative for Pennsylvania in the House of Representatives, during the first and third Congress. ... Henry Wynkoop (March 2, 1737-October 24, 1812) was a member of the Continental Congress (from 1779) and later a Representative for the state of Pennsylvania during the First United States Congress from 1789 to 1791. ... Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) An American political and military leader from the Revolutionary War period to the early 19th Century. ... Peter Muhlenberg Statue John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (October 1, 1746 - October 1, 1807) was a Clergyman, a Major General of the Continental Army, and a United States Senator and Congressman from Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Fitzsimons (1741-1811) was an American merchant and statesman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Hartley (September 7, 1748–December 21, 1800) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from York, Pennsylvania. ... Israel Jacobs (born June 9, 1726; died circa December 10, 1796) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... John Wilkes Kittera (November, 1752– June 6, 1801) was an American lawyer and politician from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) An American political and military leader from the Revolutionary War period to the early 19th Century. ... William Findley (c. ... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... Thomas Fitzsimons (1741-1811) was an American merchant and statesman of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... John Wilkes Kittera (November, 1752– June 6, 1801) was an American lawyer and politician from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Hartley (September 7, 1748–December 21, 1800) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from York, Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Scott was an American representative for Pennsylvania in the House of Representatives, during the first and third Congress. ... James Armstrong (August 29, 1748– May 6, 1828) was an American physician and politician from Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... Peter Muhlenberg Statue John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (October 1, 1746 - October 1, 1807) was a Clergyman, a Major General of the Continental Army, and a United States Senator and Congressman from Pennsylvania. ... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) An American political and military leader from the Revolutionary War period to the early 19th Century. ... William Irvine (November 3, 1741 – July 29, 1804) was an Irish-American physician, soldier, and statesman from Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... William Findley (c. ... John Smilie (1741 – December 30, 1812) was an American politician from Fayette, Pennsylvania. ... William Montgomery (August 3, 1736–May 1, 1816) was an American jurist and politician from Chester County, Pennsylvania. ...

Succeeded by

1st: John Swanwick
3rd: Richard Thomas
4th: Samuel Sitgreaves and John Richards
5th: Daniel Hiester
6th: John Andre Hanna
7th: John W. Kittera
8th: Thomas Hartley
9th: Andrew Gregg
10th: David Bard and Samuel Maclay
11th: William Findley
12th: Albert Gallatin Pennsylvanias first district includes primarily central and South Philadelphia, the City of Chester, the Philadelphia International Airport, and other small sections of Delaware County. ... John Swanwick (1760 - August 1, 1798) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Pennsylvanias third district is located in the northwestern part of the state and includes the cities of Erie, Sharon, Butler and Meadville. ... Richard Thomas (December 30, 1744 - January 19, 1832) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Pennsylvanias fourth district is located in western Pennsylvania and includes suburbs of Pittsburgh as well as Beaver County and Lawrence County The district has an slight Republican edge. ... Samuel Sitgreaves (March 16, 1764 - April 4, 1827) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... John Richards (April 18, 1753 - November 13, 1822) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Pennsylvanias fifth district is currently the largest of all of Pennsylvanias congressional districts. ... Daniel Hiester (1747-1804) An American political and military leader from the Revolutionary War period to the early 19th Century. ... Map The 6th Congressional District was substantially redrawn in the 2002 redistricting. ... John Andre Hanna (b. ... Pennsylvanias 7th congressional district is one of Pennsylvanias voting districts for the United States House of Representatives. ... John Wilkes Kittera (November, 1752– June 6, 1801) was an American lawyer and politician from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Map Pennsylvania District 8 of the United States House of Representatives is a Congressional district that serves Bucks County, along with a small portion of Montgomery County and northeast Philadelphia, in Pennsylvania. ... Thomas Hartley (September 7, 1748–December 21, 1800) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician from York, Pennsylvania. ... Pennsylvanias 9th congressional district is a relatively safe seat for the Republicans. ... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... Pennsylvanias 10th congressional district has been represented by Republican Don Sherwood since 1999. ... David Bard (1744 – March 12, 1815) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania. ... Samuel Maclay (June 17, 1741–October 5, 1811) was an American surveyor, farmer, and politician from Union County, Pennsylvania. ... Pennsylvanias 11th congressional district is an immensely safe seat for the Democrats. ... William Findley (c. ... Pennsylvanias 12th congressional district is one of Pennsylvanias districts of the United States House of Representatives. ... Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, diplomat, Congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. ...

Preceded by
At large on a General ticket:
Thomas Fitzsimons, John W. Kittera, Thomas Hartley, Thomas Scott, James Armstrong, Peter G. Muhlenberg, Andrew Gregg, Daniel Hiester, William Irvine, William Findley, John Smilie, and William Montgomery
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district

1795 - 1797
Succeeded by
Blair McClenachan
Preceded by
(none)
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
April 1, 1789March 4, 1791
Succeeded by
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
Preceded by
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
December 2, 1793March 4, 1795
Succeeded by
Jonathan Dayton

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frederick Muhlenberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (316 words)
Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (January 1, 1750June 4, 1801), was an American minister and politician who was the first Speaker of the United States House of Representatives.
Muhlenberg was a member of the Continental Congress in 1779 and 1780, and served in the State house of representatives from 1780-1783 and was elected speaker November 3, 1780.
Muhlenberg was also president of the council of censors of Pennsylvania, and was appointed receiver general of the Pennsylvania Land Office on January 8, 1800, and served until his death in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on June 4, 1801.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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