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Encyclopedia > Frederick I of Prussia
Frederick I of Prussia.
Frederick I of Prussia.
Prussian Royalty
House of Hohenzollern

Frederick I (1701-1713)
Children
   Princess Louise Dorothea
   Prince Frederick William
Frederick William I (1713-1740)
Children
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Prince Frederick
   Princess Friederike Luise
   Princess Philippine Charlotte
   Princess Sophia
   Princess Louisa Ulrika
   Prince Augustus William
   Princess Anna Amalia
   Prince Henry
   Prince Ferdinand
Frederick II (The Great, 1740-1786)
Frederick William II (1786-1797)
Children
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Louis
   Princess Wilhelmine
   Princess Augusta
   Prince Charles
   Prince Wilhelm
Frederick William III (1797-1840)
   Prince Frederick William
   Prince Wilhelm
   Princess Charlotte
   Princess Alexandrine
   Prince Charles
Frederick William IV (1840-1861)

Frederick I of Prussia (German: Friedrich I., July 11, 1657February 25, 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III; Friedrich III.) Elector of Brandenburg (16881713) and the first King in Prussia (1701 – 1713). This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x745, 79 KB) großes Wappen des Königs von Preußen (Deutscher Kaiser) nach 1873. ... Princess Louise Dorothea of Prussia was the daughter of Frederick I of Prussia, king of Prussia. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... Friederike Sophie Wilhelmine, Princess of Prussia (Berlin, July 3, 1709 - Bayreuth, October 14, 1758), was a daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Sophie of Prussia (June 14, 1870–January 13, 1932), was queen consort of King Constantine I of Greece. ... Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (Swedish: Lovisa Ulrika; German: Luise Ulrike) (1720—1782) was Queen consort of Sweden between 1751 and 1771. ... Augustus William (German: August Wilhelm; 9 August 1722, Berlin – 12 June 1758, Oranienburg), Prince of Prussia, was the second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. ... Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (November 9, 1723 - March 30, 1787) was one of eight surviving children of Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia and Sophie Dorothea von Hannover, and was the younger sister of Friedrich II of Prussia, called Friedrich the Great. ... This page refers to Prince Henry of Prussia (1726-1802); for Prince Henry of Prussia (1862-1929), see Albert Wilhelm Heinrich of Prussia. ... Prince Ferdinand of Prussia (1730-1813) was a brother of Frederick the Great (Frederick II of Prussia). ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ... Frederick William II (German: ; September 25, 1744 – November 16, 1797) was the fourth king of Prussia, reigning from 1786 until his death. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Wilhelmine of Prussia may refer to: Princess Wilhelmine of Prussia, Margravine of Bayreuth, eldest daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and the important sister of Frederick II of Prussia Wilhelmina of Prussia, Princess of Orange, daughter of Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia, niece of previous Wilhelmina of Prussia, wife... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Prince Wilhelm of Prussia (1783–1851) was the son of Frederick William II of Prussia and Frederika Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... Wilhelm I of Germany (March 22, 1797 – March 9, 1888), German Emperor (Kaiser), ruled January 18, 1871 – 9 March 1888 and King of Prussia, ruled 2 January 1861 – 9 March 1888. ... Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, Palace of Peterhoff Alexandra Feodorovna, born Charlotte, Princess of Prusia, July 13, 1798 - November 1, 1860) was Empress consort of Russia . ... Princess Alexandrine of Prussia (1803–1892), Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, was the daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. ... Prince Charles of Prussia (Friedrich Karl Alexander) was born on June 29, 1801 in Charlottenburg. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Year 1713 (MDCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... It is the little word in that makes the title King in Prussia (German König in Preussen) an extraordinary one. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ...


Biography

Born in Königsberg, he was the third son of Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg by his father's first marriage to Louise Henriette of Orange-Nassau, eldest daughter of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange and Amalia of Solms-Braunfels. His maternal cousin was King William III of England. Upon the death of his father in 1688, Frederick became Elector Frederick III of Brandenburg. Kaliningrad (Russian: ; Lithuanian: Karaliaučius; German  , Polish: Królewiec; briefly Russified as Kyonigsberg), is a seaport and the administrative center of Kaliningrad Oblast, the Russian exclave between Poland and Lithuania on the Baltic Sea. ... Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg. ... Frederick Henry (January 29, 1584–March 14, 1647), Prince of Orange, the youngest child of William the Silent, was born at Delft about six months before his fathers assassination. ... Amalia of Solms-Braunfels (31 August 1602 – 8 September 1675), countess of Solms-Braunfels, was the wife of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ...   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ...


The Hohenzollern state was then known as Brandenburg-Prussia, as the family's main possessions were the Margraviate of Brandenburg within the Holy Roman Empire and the Duchy of Prussia outside of the Empire. Although he was the Margrave and Prince-elector of Brandenburg and the Duke of Prussia, Frederick desired the more prestigious title of king. However, according to Germanic law at that time, no kingdoms could exist within the Holy Roman Empire, with the exception of the Kingdom of Bohemia. Hohenzollern redirects here. ... The Brandenburg-Prussian state was formed in 1618 when the Duchy of Prussia came under the control of the Elector of Brandenburg (part of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation). ... Coat of arms Capital Brandenburg Berlin (from 1417) Religion Roman Catholic Lutheran Calvinist Government Monarchy Margrave  - 1157–70 Albert I  - 1797–1806 Frederick William III History  - Margraviate established 3 October, 1157  - Electorate established 25 December 1356  - Brandenburg-Prussia 27 August 1618  - Kingdom of Prussia 1 January 1701  - Dissolution of the... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire in c. ... Coat of arms Duchy of Prussia (striped) in the second half of the 16th century Capital Königsberg Religion Protestant (Lutheran) Government Monarchy Duke of Prussia  - 1525 — 1568 Albert I  - 1568 — 1618 Albert Frederick History  - Secularisation April, 1525  - Personal Union (with Brandenburg) August 27, 1618  - Independence September 19, 1657 The... Margrave is the English and French form (recorded since 1551) of the German title Markgraf (from Mark march and Graf count) and certain equivalent nobiliary (princely) titles in other languages. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... The Prussian Tribute, oil on canvas by Jan Matejko, 1882, 388 x 875 cm, National Museum in Kraków. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ...


Leopold I, Archduke of Austria and Holy Roman Emperor, was convinced by Frederick to allow Prussia to be ruled as a kingdom. This agreement was ostensibly given in exchange for an alliance against King Louis XIV of France in the War of the Spanish Succession. Frederick's argument was that Prussia had never belonged to the Holy Roman Empire and therefore there was no legal or political barrier to prevent the Elector of Brandenburg from being King in Prussia. Frederick was aided in the negotiations by Charles Ancillon. Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor Silver coin of Leopold I, 3 Kreuzers, dated 1670. ... “Sun King” redirects here. ... Combatants Habsburg Empire, England (1701-1706) Great Britain (1707-1714),[1] Dutch Republic, Kingdom of Portugal, Crown of Aragon, Others[2] Kingdom of France, Kingdom of Spain, Electorate of Bavaria, Hungarian Rebels Others[3] Commanders Eugene of Savoy, Margrave of Baden, Count Starhemberg, Duke of Marlborough, Marquis de Ruvigny, Count... Charles Ancillon (July 28, 1659 - July 5, 1715), one of a distinguished family of Huguenots, was born at Metz, Moselle, France. ...


Frederick crowned himself "King Frederick I in Prussia" on January 18, 1701 in Königsberg. To indicate that Frederick's royalty was limited to Prussia and did not reduce the rights of the Emperor in Frederick's Imperial territories, he had to call himself "King in Prussia", instead of "King of Prussia"; his grandson Frederick II of Prussia was the first Prussian king to formally style himself "King of Prussia". is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... It is the little word in that makes the title King in Prussia (German König in Preussen) an extraordinary one. ... The following is a list of Kings of Prussia (Könige von Preußen) from the Hohenzollern family. ... Frederick II (German: ; January 24, 1712 – August 17, 1786) was a King of Prussia (1740–1786) from the Hohenzollern dynasty. ...


Frederick was a patron of the arts. The Akademie der Künste in Berlin was founded by Frederick in 1696, as was the Academy of Sciences in 1700. Akademie der Künste at Pariser Platz, Berlin The Akademie der Künste (Academy of the Arts) in Berlin was founded in 1696 by Kurfürst (Elector) Friedrich III. of Brandenburg as an educational establishment. ... The Prussian Academy of Sciences (German: ) was an academy established in Berlin on July 11, 1700. ...


Frederick was married three times: first to Elizabeth Henrietta of Hesse-Kassel, with whom he had one child, Louise Dorothea, b. 1680, who died without issue at age 25; then to Sophia Charlotte of Hanover, with whom he had Frederick William I, born in 1688, who succeeded him. In 1708, he married Sophia Louise of Mecklenburg, who survived him but had no children by him. Frederick died in Berlin in 1713. This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ... Sophia Charlotte of Hanover was born on October 30, 1668, at Schloss Iburg near Osnabrück. ... Frederick William I (German: Friedrich Wilhelm I) (August 14, 1688 – May 31, 1740) of the House of Hohenzollern, was the King in Prussia from 1713 until his death. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...


Ancestors

Frederick's ancestors in three generations
Frederick I of Prussia Father:
Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg
Paternal Grandfather:
George William, Elector of Brandenburg
Paternal Great-grandfather:
John Sigismund, Elector of Brandenburg
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Anna, Duchess of Prussia
Paternal Grandmother:
Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate
Paternal Great-grandfather:
Frederick IV, Elector Palatine
Paternal Great-grandmother:
Louise Juliana of Nassau
Mother:
Louise Henriette of Orange-Nassau
Maternal Grandfather:
Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange
Maternal Great-grandfather:
William the Silent
Maternal Great-grandmother:
Louise de Coligny
Maternal Grandmother:
Amalia of Solms-Braunfels
Maternal Great-grandfather:
Johan Albrecht I of Solms-Braunfels
Maternal Great-grandmother:
Agnes of Sayn-Wittgenstein
Frederick I of Prussia
House of Hohenzollern
Born: 11 July 1657
Died: 25 February 1713
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Frederick William
Duke of Prussia
1688 — 1701
Elevation to Kingdom
Elector of Brandenburg
as Frederick III

1688 — 1713
Succeeded by
Frederick William I
New Title King in Prussia
1701 — 1713

  Results from FactBites:
 
MSN Encarta - Frederick II (of Prussia) (945 words)
Frederick was born in Berlin on January 24, 1712, son of King Frederick William I and grandson of Frederick I. As crown prince he was trained, under his father's supervision, to become a soldier and a thrifty administrator.
Frederick acquired East Friesland (now a region of Germany) in 1744, on the death of the last ruler without heirs of that principality, and in 1745 he fought and won a second war with Austria, terminated by the Peace of Dresden, which assured Prussia the possession of Silesia.
Frederick made an alliance with Catherine II of Russia, in 1764, and by the first partition of Poland in 1772 he received Polish Prussia, exclusive of Gdańsk (Danzig) and Toruń (Thorn), thus uniting the regions of Brandenburg and Pomerania.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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