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Encyclopedia > Frederick Donald Coggan

Frederick Donald Coggan, Baron Coggan (1909 - May 17, 2000) was the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury from 1974 to 1980.


Background

Born in Highgate, London, England, Coggan was a lecturer in Semitic languages at Manchester University from 1931 to 1934, a professor of the New Testament at Wycliffe College in Toronto from 1937 to 1944, and principal of London College of Divinity from 1944 to 1956.


Life and work

He was ordained a priest in 1935, appointed Bishop of Bradford in 1956 and Archbishop of York in 1965. After his retirement as Archbishop of Canterbury he was elevated to the House of Lords, as Baron Coggan, of Canterbury and Sissinghurst in the County of Kent.


His time as archbishop is noted for his strong support for the ordination of women (which did not happen until 1994), having proposed it at the Lambeth Conference of the world's Anglican churches in 1970. His comparatively brief tenure was marked by his boldness, orderliness and punctuality. Aside from his duties of his primacy, he was a prolific writer - his works including Call To The Nation (1975). He was also a speaker and preacher, often accompanied by his wife, Jean Braithwaite.


Among his other roles was being Honorary President of the United Bible Societies from 1957 to 1976. His excellent knowledge of the scriptures meant he made an enormous contribution to the furthering of the organisation. He also founded the Lord Coggan Memorial Fund which helped to supply Russian children with copies of the bible.


He was buried at St Alban’s Cathedral, Hertfordshire.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Donald Coggan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (314 words)
Frederick Donald Coggan, Baron Coggan (December 23, 1909 - May 17, 2000) was the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury from 1974 to 1980, during which time he visited Rome and met the Pontiff, in company with Bishop Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, future Cardinal of England and Wales.
Born in Highgate, London, England, Coggan was a lecturer in Semitic languages at the University of Manchester from 1931 to 1934, a professor of the New Testament at Wycliffe College in Toronto from 1937 to 1944, and principal of London College of Divinity from 1944 to 1956.
His tenure as archbishop is noted for his strong support for the ordination of women (which did not happen until 1994), having proposed it at the Lambeth Conference of the world's Anglican churches in 1970.
Guardian | Lord Coggan of Canterbury (1306 words)
Coggan, whose dedication was equally transparent, was the scholarly theologian with a tape recorder handy for prompt dictation, and a meticulousness equal to that of any company director.
Donald Coggan was born in Highgate, north London, educated at Merchant Taylors' school, Northwood, Middlesex, and St John's College, Cambridge, and was in his mid-teens when the call to be ordained came to him.
Coggan always maintained that he learned much, both of life itself and of the meaning of ministry, during his three years amid the poverty, unemployment and inadequate housing of that part of inner north London in those prewar days.
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