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Encyclopedia > Fred Waring

Fredrick Malcolm Waring (born June 9, 1900 in Tyrone, Pennsylvania, died July 29, 1984, State College, Pennsylvania) was a popular musician, bandleader, and radio and TV personality of the 20th century, sometimes referred to as "the man who taught America how to sing." June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... Tyrone is a borough located in Blair County, Pennsylvania, 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Altoona, on the Little Juniata River. ... July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Downtown State College, during 2005 Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts State College, Pennsylvania, is a borough -- and more generally used, the borough and surrounding townships -- located in Centre County in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... Idiot box redirects here. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Waring was born on June 9, 1900 in Tyrone, Pennsylvania. From an early age he showed an affinity for music, making his first stage appearance at the age of five and leading the local Boy Scout drum corps a few years later. As a teenager Waring, his brother Tom, neighbor Freddie Buck, and friend Poley McClintock formed the Waring-McClintock Snap Orchestra. In their college days the quartet became known as Waring's Banjo Orchestra, playing various parties, proms and local dances at Penn State College. The band, with its fast-paced playing style and unique vocals, became so popular that Waring decided to abandon his studies in architectural engineering and tour with the band full-time. June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... Tyrone is a borough located in Blair County, Pennsylvania, 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Altoona, on the Little Juniata River. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ...


Throughout the 1920’s Waring and the growing band (now called "The Pennsylvanians") toured from coast to coast. In Hollywood they starred in several motion pictures including Syncopation, Varsity Show, and several short-themed &"talkies". Waring and the Pennsylvanians were in at the infancy of the recording industry; their audition recording of the waltz tune “Sleep” for Thomas Edison became their first theme song. With the Victor Talking Machine Company (later RCA Victor) they would make one of the first commercial electronic sound recordings. (By 1980, Waring and the Pennsylvanians had recorded over 1,500 songs on more than 100 albums.) Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ...


In the 1930’s Waring and the Pennsylvanians, now a 55-piece orchestra, achieved national exposure with a 6-month engagement at New York’s Roxy Theater and their first radio program. Waring chose two theme songs for his programs, which would become attached to the band forever, opening his shows with “I Hear Music” and closing with “Sleep.”


It was also during the 1930’s that Waring helped refine the design for an electrical blender. Waring once touted the blender by saying, "…this mixer is going to revolutionize American drinks." Waring blenders became an essential appliance for every “modern kitchen.” It was said that Waring blenders were used by Jonas Salk for developing his polio vaccine. Jonas Edward Salk (October 28, 1914 – June 23, 1995) was an American physician and researcher, best known as the inventor of the first polio vaccine (the eponymous Salk vaccine). ...


When he decided to add a men’s singing group to his growing ensemble, he recruited a young man named Robert Shaw, recently out of the Pomona College glee club in California, to train his singers. Shaw, of course, went on to found the Robert Shaw Chorale, direct the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, and become America’s preeminent conductor of "serious" choral music -- although the decidedly "schmaltzy" recordings of the men of the Robert Shaw Chorale contain strong echoes of the famous Waring glee club sound. Robert Shaw (April 30, 1916, Red Bluff, California – January 25, 1999, New Haven, Connecticut) was a conductor most famous for his work with his namesake Chorale and the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus. ... The Smith Campus Center Fountain at Pomona College during the inauguration of David Oxtoby Pomona College is a small private residential liberal arts college in Claremont, California, located 47 miles (76 km) east of Los Angeles. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq. ... The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra (ASO) is an American orchestra based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ...


During the war years, Waring and his ensemble appeared at countless war bond rallies and entertained the troops at training camps. He also composed and/or performed dozens of patriotic songs, his most famous being “My America.” Throughout the 1940s and early 1950s Waring and The Pennsylvanians produced a string of hits, selling millions of records, and remained among the best known musical groups in the nation. A few of his many choral hits include "Sleep," "Battle Hymn of the Republic," "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes," "Button Up Your Overcoat," "White Christmas," and "Dancing In The Dark." German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ... An American War Bonds poster from 1942 War bonds were a form of savings bond used by many combatant nations to help fund World War I and World War II. They were also a measure to manage inflation by removing money from the economy heated up by the war efforts. ... The Battle Hymn of the Republic is a patriotic anthem written by Julia Ward Howe for the United States during the American Civil War as a replacement for the words to the marching song John Browns Body. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... The phrase Dancing in the dark may refer to several things: A song by Arthur Schwartz and Howard Dietz, featured in the film The Band Wagon. ...


In 1947, Waring began holding summer choral workshops at his Pennsylvania headquarters in Shawnee-on-the Delaware. For 37 years, talented young musicians from all over America flocked to these sessions and were taught to sing with precision, sensitivity and enthusiasm by the meticulous Waring. Among the many techniques the “maestro” shared with his pupils was his method of pronouncing “every sound of every syllable of every word,” thereby making the words of a song as clear to the audience as the music. The inspired singers then went home and shared what they had learned with fellow musicians, and Waring’s approach to choral singing spread throughout the nation. His reputation as “the man who taught America how to sing” was well earned. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ...


Waring expanded into television in 1949 with The Fred Waring Show on CBS. The program ran until 1955 and received several awards for Best Musical Program. In the 60s and 70s, popular musical tastes turned from choral music, but Waring changed with the times, introducing his “Young Pennsylvanians,” a group of fresh-faced, long-haired, bell-bottomed performers who sang both old favorites and “choralized” arrangements of contemporary songs. In this way he continued to be a popular touring attraction, logging some 40,000 miles a year. 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, the former legal name of the network) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ron Ketelsen, a "Young Pennsylvanians" singer in the late 70s, remembers Fred Waring with both awe and affection. "Whenever he entered a room, people stood up," Ketelsen said. "He was extremely well respected. No one ever called him 'Fred' - it was always "Mr. Waring." Ketelsen also remembers his repartee with his audiences between musical numbers. As a judge of the "Miss America" competition, Waring sometimes invited contestants onto his shows, and might comment on the brevity of their outfits by saying, "The women's costumes aren't quite finished yet, but I'm sure you'll enjoy what you do see." Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wit is a form of intellectual humor, based on manipulation of concepts; a wit is someone who excels in witty remarks, typically in conversation and spontaneously, since wit carries the connotation of speed of thought. ...


Throughout his career, Fred Waring received many awards, but none was as illustrious as his last one. In 1983, the 83-year-old Waring — by now considered king of popular choral music — was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest honor for a civilian, by President Ronald Reagan. Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal of Honor is the highest award which may be bestowed by the Legislative Branch of the United States government. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


Fred Waring died suddenly on July 29, 1984 at the place where it all began — Penn State University — just after videotaping a concert with his ensemble and completing his annual summer choral workshop. He conducted many such workshops at Penn State in his later years, and in 1984 designated Penn State to house his collection of archives and memorabilia. He also served his alma mater as a trustee and was named a Distinguished Alumnus of the University. Waring Commons, the dining hall/mailroom building for West Halls at Penn State, is named for him. A small meeting room by the West Wing restaurant has dozens of cartoons drawn by artists such as Al Hirschfeld in Waring's honor. July 29 is the 210th day (211th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 155 days remaining. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... Al Hirschfeld photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1955 Albert Hirschfeld (June 21, 1903 – January 20, 2003) was an American caricaturist, best known for his simple black and white satirical portraits of celebrities and Broadway stars. ...


The always-popular bandleader/choral conductor had spent a lifetime entertaining a nation and had, indeed, taught it how to sing. For almost 70 years this untiring artist and his beloved "Pennsylvanians" had enchanted audiences too numerous to count. There is little doubt that "Mr. Waring" did more to popularize choral music in America than any other person.


Media

  • The Star-Spangled Banner (1942) ( file info)
    • Fred Waring and His Pennsylvanians sing The Star-Spangled Banner in 1942
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Star-spangled banner. ...

External links

  • Bio
  • Fred Waring Biography, Penn State University Library, Special Collections Library

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fred Waring - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1120 words)
Waring was born on June 9, 1900 in Tyrone, Pennsylvania.
Waring and the Pennsylvanians were in at the infancy of the recording industry; their audition recording of the waltz tune “Sleep” for Thomas Edison became their first theme song.
Waring once touted the blender by saying, "…this mixer is going to revolutionize American drinks." Waring blenders became an essential appliance for every “modern kitchen.” It was said that Waring blenders were used by Jonas Salk for developing his polio vaccine.
NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Fred Waring (2048 words)
Fred Waring: “The man who taught America how to sing” Fredrick Malcolm Waring was born on June 9, 1900 in Tyrone, Pennsylvania.
Waring chose two theme songs for his programs, which would become attached to the band forever, opening his shows with “I Hear Music” and closing with “Sleep.” It was also during the 1930’s that Waring helped refine the design for an electrical blender.
Waring blenders became an essential appliance for every “modern kitchen.” It was said that Waring blenders were used by Jonas Salk for developing his polio vaccine.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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