FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Frantz Fanon

Frantz Fanon (July 20, 1925December 6, 1961) was an author from Martinique, essayist, psychoanalyst, and revolutionary. He was perhaps the preeminent thinker of the 20th century on the issue of decolonization and the psychopathology of colonization. His works have inspired anti-colonial liberation movements for more than four decades.[1] is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Colonialism in 1945 Decolonization refers to the undoing of colonialism, the establishment of governance or authority through the creation of settlements by another country or jurisdiction. ... Psychopathology is a term which refers to either the study of mental illness or mental distress, or the manifestation of behaviors and experiences which may be indicative of mental illness or psychological impairment. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ... hey, frank the tank rocks ur mom. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Contents

Biography

Martinique and World War II

Dr. Fanon was born on the Caribbean island of Martinique, then a French colony and now a French département. He was born into a mixed family background: his father was the descendent of African slaves, and his mother was said to be an illegitimate child of mixed race, whose white ancestors came from Strasbourg in Alsace. The family was relatively well-off for Martiniquans, but far from middle class. They could, however, afford the fees for the Lycée Schoelcher, then the most prestigious high school in Martinique, where famed poet Aimé Césaire was Frantz Fanon's teacher. West Indies redirects here. ... -1... The départements (or departments) are administrative units of France, roughly analogous to British counties. ... For other uses, see Strasburg. ... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Aimé Fernand David Césaire (born June 25, 1913) is a French poet, author and politician. ...


After France fell to the Nazis in 1940, Vichy French naval troops were blockaded on Martinique. Forced to remain on the island, French soldiers became "authentic racists". Many accusations of harassment and sexual misconduct arose. The abuse of the Martiniquan people by the French Army was a major influence on Fanon, as it reinforced his feelings of alienation and his disgust at the realities of colonial racism. At the age of eighteen, Fanon fled the island as a "dissident" (the coined word for French West Indians joining the gaullist forces) and traveled to then British Dominica to join the Free French Forces. He later enlisted in the French army and saw service in France, notably in the battles of Alsace. In 1944 he was wounded at Colmar and received the Croix de Guerre medal. When the Nazis were defeated and Allied forces crossed the Rhine into Germany, along with photo journalists, Fanon's regiment was "bleached" of all non-white soldiers and Fanon and his fellow black soldiers were sent to Toulon instead. The Nazi party used a right-facing swastika as their symbol and the red and black colors were said to represent Blut und Boden (blood and soil). ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Gaullism is a French political ideology based on the thought and action of Charles de Gaulle. ... Flag De Jure territory Capital Paris Capital-in-exile London, Algiers Government Republic Leader Charles de Gaulle Historical era World War II  - de Gaulles appeal June 18, 1940  - Liberation of Paris August, 1944 The Free French Forces (French: , FFL) were French fighters in World War II, who decided to... (New region flag) (Region logo) Location Administration Capital Regional President Departments Bas-Rhin Haut-Rhin Arrondissements 13 Cantons 75 Communes 903 Statistics Land area1 8,280 km² (??? mi) km² Population (Ranked 14th)  - January 1, 2006 est. ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Petite Venise Colmar is a town and commune in the Haut-Rhin département of Alsace, France. ... The Croix de guerre is a military decoration of both Belgium and France which was first created in 1915. ... In general, allies are people or groups that have joined an alliance and are working together to achieve some common purpose. ... For other uses, see Rhine (disambiguation). ... Panorama of Toulon area. ...


In 1945 Fanon returned to Martinique. His return lasted only a short time. While there, he worked for the parliamentary campaign of his friend and mentor Aimé Césaire, who would be the greatest influence in his life. Although Fanon never professed to be a communist, Césaire ran on the communist ticket as a parliamentary delegate from Martinique to the first National Assembly of the Fourth Republic. Fanon stayed long enough to complete his Baccalaureate and then went to France where he studied medicine and psychiatry. He was educated in Lyon where he studied literature, drama and philosophy, sometimes attending Merleau-Ponty's lectures. After qualifying as a psychiatrist in 1951, Fanon did a residency in psychiatry under the radical Catalan psychiatrist Francois Tosquelles, who invigorated Fanon's thinking by emphasizing the important yet often overlooked role of culture in psychopathology. After his residency, Fanon practiced psychiatry in France for another year and then (from 1953) in Algeria. He was chef de service at the Blida-Joinville Psychiatric Hospital in Algeria, where he stayed until his resignation in 1956. In retrospect one might wonder why Fanon spent over 10 years in the service of France, but his servitude to France's army (and his experiences in Martinique) fueled Black Skin, White Masks. For Fanon, being colonized by a language had larger implications for one's political consciousness: "To speak . . . means above all to assume a culture, to support the weight of a civilization" (BSWM 17-18). Speaking French means that one accepts, or is coerced into accepting, the collective consciousness of the French. Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Aimé Fernand David Césaire (born June 25, 1913) is a French poet, author and politician. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... This article is about the French city. ... Maurice Merleau-Ponty (March 14, 1908 - May 4, 1961) was a French phenomenologist philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl, and often somewhat mistakenly classified as an existentialist thinker because of his close association with Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, and his distinctly Heideggerian conception of Being. ... For other uses, see Psychiatrist (disambiguation). ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Catalans are an ethnic group or nationality whose homeland is Catalonia, or the Principality of Catalonia (Catalan: Catalunya, or Principat de Catalunya), which is a historical region in southern Europe, embracing a territory situated in the north-east of Spain and an adjoining portion of southern France. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // Consciousness typically refers to the idea of a being who is self-aware. ...


France

While in France, Fanon wrote his first book, Black Skin, White Masks, an analysis of the effect of colonial subjugation on the human psyche. This book was a personal account of Fanon’s experience of being a black man, an intellectual with a French education rejected in France by the French because of his skin color. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Algeria

Fanon left France for Algeria, where he had been stationed for some time during the war. He secured an appointment as a psychiatrist at Blida-Joinville Psychiatric Hospital. It was there that he radicalized methods of treatment. In particular, he began socio-therapy which connected with his patients' cultural backgrounds. He also trained nurses and interns. Following the outbreak of the Algerian revolution in November 1954 he joined the FLN liberation front (Front de Libération Nationale) as a result of contacts with Dr Chaulet. Combatants FLN (1954-62) MNA (1954-62) France (1954-62) FAF (1960-61) OAS (1961-62) Commanders Mostefa Benboulaïd Ferhat Abbas Hocine Aït Ahmed Ahmed Ben Bella Krim Belkacem Larbi Ben MHidi Rabah Bitat Mohamed Boudiaf Messali Hadj Paul Cherrière (1954-55) Henri Lorillot (1955-56... The National Liberation Front (French: Front de libération nationale aka FLN, Arabic: Jabhah al-TaḩrÄ«r al-WaÅ£anÄ«) is a socialist political party in Algeria. ...


In The Wretched of the Earth (Les damnés de la terre), Fanon later discussed in depth the effects on Algerians of torture by the French forces. His book was then censored by France. The Wretched of the Earth (French: Les Damnés de la Terre, first published 1961) is Frantz Fanons most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. ... The French Army made a systemic use of torture during the Algerian War of Independence (1954-62), which was theorized as a counter-insurgency tactic by Roger Trinquier in Modern Warfare: A French View of Counterinsurgency (1961). ... It has been suggested that Freedom of information in France be merged into this article or section. ...


Fanon made extensive trips across Algeria, mainly in the Kabyle region, to study the cultural/psychological life of Algerians. His lost study of "The marabout of Si Slimane" is an example. These trips were also a means for clandestine activities, notably in his visits to the ski resort of Chrea which hid an FLN base. By summer 1956 he wrote his famous "Letter of resignation to the Resident Minister" and made a clean break with his French assimilationist upbringing and education. He was expelled from Algeria in January 1957 and the "nest of fellaghas [rebels]" at Blida hospital was dismantled. Fanon left for France and subsequently traveled secretly to Tunis. He was part of the editorial collective of El Moudjahid for which he wrote to the end of his life. He also served as Ambassador to Ghana for the Provisional Algerian Government (GPRA) and attended conferences in Accra, Conakry, Addis Ababa, Leopoldville, Cairo and Tripoli. Many of his shorter writings from this period were collected posthumously in the book Toward the African Revolution. In this book Fanon reveals himself as a war strategist; in one chapter he discusses how to open a southern front to the war and how to run the supply lines. This article focuses on the geographical area of Kabylie and its people. ... Cultural assimilation (often called merely assimilation) is an intense process of consistent integration whereby members of an ethno-cultural group, typically immigrants, or other minority groups, are absorbed into an established, generally larger community. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Provisional Government of the Algerian Republic (French, Gouvernement Provisoire de la République Algérienne, GPRA) was the government-in-exile of the Algerian Front de Libération Nationale (FLN) resistance movement, during the latter part of the Algerian War of Independence (1954-62). ... Accra, population 1,970,400 (2005), is the capital of Ghana. ... Conakry or Konakry (Malinké: KÉ”nakiri) is the capital and largest city of Guinea. ... For the long-distance runner, see Addis Abebe. ... Kinshasa (formerly Léopoldville) is the capital and largest city of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ...


Death

On his return to Tunis, after his exhausting trip across the Sahara to open a Third Front, Fanon was diagnosed with leukemia. He went to the Soviet Union for treatment and experienced some remission of his illness. On his return to Tunis he dictated his testament The Wretched of the Earth. When he was not confined to his bed, he delivered lectures to ALN (Armée de Libération Nationale) officers at Ghardimao on the Algero-Tunisian border. He made a final visit to Sartre in Rome and went for further leukemia treatment in the USA. Ironically, he was assisted by the CIA in traveling to the United States to receive treatment. He died in Bethesda, Maryland on December 6, 1961 under the name of Ibrahim Fanon. He was buried in Algeria, after lying in state in Tunisia. Later his body was moved to a martyrs (chouhada) graveyard at Ain Kerma in eastern Algeria. Fanon was survived by his wife, Josie (maiden name: Dublé, who committed suicide in Algiers in 1989), their son, Olivier and his daughter (from a previous relationship) Mireille. Mireille married Bernard Mendès-France, son of the French politician Pierre Mendès-France. Leukemia or leukaemia(Greek leukos λευκός, “white”; aima αίμα, “blood”) (see spelling differences) is a cancer of the blood or bone marrow and is characterized by an abnormal proliferation (production by multiplication) of blood cells, usually white blood cells (leukocytes). ... The Wretched of the Earth (French: Les Damnés de la Terre, first published 1961) is Frantz Fanons most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. ... Jean Paul Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre (June 21, 1905–April 15, 1980) was a French existentialist philosopher, dramatist, novelist and critic. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Bethesda, the name of a pool in the New Testament, has been adopted as a name by many other places and things. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pierre Mendès France Pierre Mendès France (Paris, 11 January 1907 - 18 October 1982), French politician, was born in Paris, into a family of Portuguese Sephardic Jewish origin. ...


Work

Although Fanon wrote Black Skin, White Masks while still in France, most of his work was written while in North Africa. It was during this time that he produced his greatest works, Year 5 of the Algerian Revolution (later republished as A Dying Colonialism) and perhaps the most important work on decolonization yet written, The Wretched of the Earth[2]. The Wretched of the Earth was first published in 1961 by François Maspero and has a preface by Jean-Paul Sartre.[3] In it Fanon analyzes the role of class, race, national culture and violence in the struggle for national liberation. Both books established Fanon in the eyes of much of the Third World as the leading anti-colonial thinker of the 20th century. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Colonialism in 1945 Decolonization refers to the undoing of colonialism, the establishment of governance or authority through the creation of settlements by another country or jurisdiction. ... The Wretched of the Earth (French: Les Damnés de la Terre, first published 1961) is Frantz Fanons most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. ... François Maspero (b 1932 in Paris [1]) is a French author and journalist, best known as an editor for leftist books in the 1970s. ... Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre (June 21, 1905 – April 15, 1980), normally known simply as Jean-Paul Sartre (pronounced: ), was a French existentialist philosopher and pioneer, dramatist and screenwriter, novelist and critic. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Jamaican reggae band, see Third World (band). ...


Fanon's three books were supplemented by numerous psychiatry articles as well as radical critiques of French colonialism in journals like, Esprit and El Moudjahid.


The reception of his work has been affected by English translations which are recognized to contain numerous omissions and errors, while his unpublished work, including his doctoral thesis, has received little attention. As a result, Fanon has often been portrayed as an advocate of violence. This reductionist vision of Fanon's work ignores the subtlety of his understanding of the colonial system. For Fanon in "The Wretched of the Earth", the colonizer's presence in Algeria is based sheerly on military strength. Any resistance to this strength must also be of a violent nature because it is the only 'language' the colonizer speaks. The relevance of language and the reformation of discourse pervades much of his work, which is why it is so interdisciplinary, spanning psychiatric concerns to encompass politics, sociology, anthropology, linguistics and literature.[citation needed]


His participation in the Algerian FLN (Front de Libération Nationale) from 1955 determined his audience as the Algerian colonized. It was to them that his final work, Les damnés de la terre (translated into English by Constance Farrington as The Wretched of the Earth) was directed. It constitutes a warning to the oppressed of the dangers they face in the whirlwind of decolonization and the transition to a neo-colonialist/globalized world. The National Liberation Front (French: Front de libération nationale aka FLN, Arabic: Jabhah al-TaḩrÄ«r al-WaÅ£anÄ«) is a socialist political party in Algeria. ... The Wretched of the Earth (French: Les Damnés de la Terre, first published 1961) is Frantz Fanons most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. ...


Influences

Much of Fanon's writings is traced to the influence of Aimé Césaire. But, while it could be said that Fanon's works are directly influenced by the Négritude movement, Fanon reformulated the theory of Césaire and Léopold Senghor by positing a new theory of consciousness. Négritude implicitly based consciousness in racial difference and tension. Fanon's psychological training and experience influenced him to base much of the problems he saw as psychological and as the product of the domination which arises in oppressive colonial situations. That is, consciousness was not of "racial essence" but a fact arising from political and social situations. Fanon's consciousness was not purely black, but extended to colonized peoples of any racial category. Fanon's own explanation of the difference between his theory and that of Blaise Diagne, Senghor and Césaire was based in an evolutionary model where the colonized ideologies transition from assimiliationist, négritude, and finally Fanon's own theory.[4] Aimé Fernand David Césaire (born June 25, 1913) is a French poet, author and politician. ... Négritude is a literary and political movement developed in the 1930s by a group that included the future Senegalese President Léopold Sédar Senghor, Martinican poet Aimé Césaire, and Léon Damas. ... Léopold Sédar Senghor (October 9, 1906 – December 20, 2001) was a Senegalese poet and politician who served as the first president of Senegal (1960–1980). ... Blaise Diagne ( 1872 - 1934) was a Senegalise politician who advocated for African participation in politics and fair treatment of ethnic minorities in the French army. ...


Influence

Fanon has had an inspiring impact on anti-colonial and liberation movements. In particular, Les damnés de la terre was a major influence on the work of revolutionary leaders such as Ali Shariati in Iran, Steve Biko in South Africa, Malcom X in the United States and Ernesto Che Guevara in Cuba. Of these only Guevara was primarily concerned with Fanon's theories on violence; for Shariati and Biko the main interest in Fanon was "the new man" and "black consciousness" respectively [5]. Fanon's influence extended to the liberation movements of the Palestinians, the Tamils, the Irish, African Americans and others. More recently, the South African movement Abahlali baseMjondolo is influenced by Fanon's work. Ali Shariati (Persian: علی شريعتی‎) (1933–1977) was an Iranian sociologist, well known and respected for his works in the field of sociology of religion. ... Steve Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s. ... Malcolm X (pronounced Malkolm Eks, May 19, 1925–February 21, 1965 – also: Malcolm Little, El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz, and Omowale) was a spokesman for the Nation of Islam, and a founder of both the Muslim Mosque, Inc. ... Che Guevara Ernesto Rafael Guevara de la Serna (May 14, 1928 – October 9, 1967), commonly known as Che Guevara, was an Argentine-born Marxist revolutionary and Cuban guerrilla leader. ... For other uses of Palestinian, see Definitions of Palestine and Palestinian. ... Languages Tamil Religions Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Jainism Related ethnic groups Dravidian people Brahui people Kannadigas Malayalis Tamils Telugus Tuluvas Gonds The Tamil people are a multi-ethnic group from the Indian subcontinent with a recorded history going back more than two millennia. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


References in the arts

Fanon has become a hero to many people, both as a theorist influenced by négritude and as an advocate of resistance and revolution, especially with relation to violence in revolution. Often, his mention is more as a symbol that the artist is familiar with the works of classic writers in the struggle against colonialism. Négritude is a literary and political movement developed in the 1930s by a group that included the future Senegalese President Léopold Sédar Senghor, Martinican poet Aimé Césaire, and Léon Damas. ...


Music

Rage Against the Machine references Fanon, "grip tha cannon like Fanon and pass tha shell to my classmate" in a track entitled "Year of tha Boomerang" on their 1996 release Evil Empire. The Wretched of the Earth appears on the inside of the album cover. This use of Fanon in the context of an advocate of violent insurrection can be compared to the use by Rage Against the Machine lead singer, Zack de la Rocha, a track recorded with artists Last Emperor and KRS-One called "C.I.A. (Criminals In Action)." The lyric is: "I bring the sun at red dawn upon the thoughts of Frantz Fanon, So stand at attention devil dirge, You'll never survive choosing sides against the Wretched of the Earth." Here, de la Rocha uses Fanon's name to invoke a sense of power, through being more than a mere anti-authoritarian resistor, but as one who is well educated and is descendant of a great resistor of the past. Rage Against the Machine (also Rage and RATM) is an American rock band, noted for their blend of hip hop, heavy metal, punk and funk as well as their revolutionary politics and lyrics. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Evil Empire is the second album by Rage Against the Machine. ... Zacarías Manuel Zack de la Rocha (born January 12, 1970 in Long Beach, California) is a rapper, musician, poet, and activist best known as the vocalist and lyricist of Rage Against the Machine. ... Jamal Gray more commonly known as The Last Emperor, is a Philadelphia-born rapper. ... KRS-One (born Lawrence Krisna Parker on August 20, 1965 in Brooklyn, New York. ...


A similar case of Fanon's name being used to give to artist's revolutionary cause a sense of timeless authority is by Digable Planets. Digable Planets refer to Fanon in their rap-jazz cut "Little Renee" from the Coneheads motion picture soundtrack. Digable Planets is a New York City based alternative hip hop group composed of Ishmael Butterfly Butler (from New York), Craig Doodlebug Irving (from Philadelphia), and Mary Ann Ladybug Mecca Vieira (from Washington, D.C.). They were backed by Silkworm, who later embarked on a solo career under the name... The Coneheads was originally a sketch on Saturday Night Live which starred Dan Aykroyd as father Beldar, Jane Curtin as mother Prymaat and Kristen Kilpatrick as daughter (Connie). The Coneheads were an alien family, natives of the planet Remulak, who found themselves stranded on Earth. ...


Contemporary Art

Jimmie Durham, an American Indian conceptual artist, references Fanon's postcolonial thought in a piece entitled "Often Durham Employs..." (1998), with this quote from Fanon- "The zone where the natives live is not complementary to the zone inhabited by the settlers." Jimmie Durham is a sculptor, essayist and poet of Cherokee heritage. ...


Cinema

British film maker Isaac Julien made a 1995 film mixing interviews of Fanon's relatives and friends with fictionalized incidents of his life. Isaac Julien (born 1960 in London, England) is a filmmaker whose work often deals with black gay politics. ...


In Denys Arcand's The Barbarian Invasions, the main character Remy, who suffers from a terminal cancer, reunites with his old friends in a cottage where they all remember their intellectual and sexual exploits in life. At one point Remy's friend Claude says "we read Fanon and became anti-colonialists." Georges-Henri Denys Arcand, C.C., C.Q. born June 25, 1941 in Deschambault, Quebec, Canada is an Academy Award winning film director, screenwriter and producer. ... The Barbarian Invasions (French: Les Invasions barbares) is a French Canadian comedy/drama film directed by Denys Arcand. ...


Bibliography

Fanon's writings

This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Grove Press is an American publishing imprint that was founded in 1951. ... A Dying Colonialism, published in 1959, is an account of the Algerian War written by Frantz Fanon. ... The Wretched of the Earth (French: Les Damnés de la Terre, first published 1961) is Frantz Fanons most famous work, written during and regarding the Algerian struggle for independence from colonial rule. ...

Books on Fanon

  • Patrick Ehlen, Frantz Fanon: A Spiritual Biography (2001: New York, NY, Crossroad 8th Avenue) ISBN 0-8245-2354-7
  • Nigel C. Gibson [ed.], Rethinking Fanon: The Continuing Dialougue (1999: Amherst, New York, Humanity Books)
  • Nigel C. Gibson, Fanon: The Postcolonial Imagination (2003: Oxford, Polity Press)
  • Lewis R. Gordon, Fanon and the Crisis of European Man: An Essay on Philosophy and the Human Sciences (1995: New York, Routlegde)
  • Lewis R. Gordon, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, & Renee T. White [edd] Fanon: A Critical Reader (1996: Oxford, Blackwell)
  • Macey, David Frantz Fanon: A Biography (2000: New York, NY, Picador Press) ISBN 0-312-27550-1
  • Ato Sekyi-Otu Fanon's Dialectic of Experience (1996: Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press)
  • Alice Cherki, "Frantz Fanon. Portrait" (2000: Paris, Seuil)

Nigel Gibson is an activist and scholar. ... Lewis Gordon is an African American philosopher who works in the areas of Africana philosophy, philosophy of human and life sciences, phenomenology, philosophy of existence, social and political theory, postcolonial thought, theories of race and racism, philosophies of liberation, aesthetics, philosophy of education, and philosophy of religion. ... Ato Sekyi-Otu is a Ghanaian post-colonial intellectual. ... Alice Cherki is a psychoanalyst practising in Paris. ...

Films on Fanon=

  • Isaac Julien, "Frantz Fanon: Black Skin White Mask" (a documentary) (1996: San Francisco, California Newsreel)
  • Christian Filostrat Interviews Frantz Fanon's Wife Josie, November 16, 1978, Howard University’s African-American Center.

is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

  1. ^ Benjamin Graves. Frantz Fanon: an Introduction. Political Discourse - Theories of Colonialism and Postcolonialism. National University of Singapore. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  2. ^ Sartre, Jean-Paul. "Preface". Fanon, Franz. Black Skin, White Masks, transl. Charles Lam Markmann (1967: New York, Grove Press)
  3. ^ Extraits de la préface de Jean-Paul Sartre au «Les Damnés de la Terre» (Extracts from the preface by Jean-Paul Sartre to The Wretched of the Eeath) (French). Tambour Journal. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  4. ^ Lambert (1993), page 258
  5. ^ Lewis R. Gordon, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, & Renee T. White [edd] Fanon: A Critical Reader (1996: Oxford, Blackwell) p 163 & Bianchi, Eugene C. The Religious Experience of Revolutionaries (1972 Doubleday) p 206

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frantz Fanon (407 words)
Frantz Fanon is perhaps the preeminent thinker of the 20th century on the issue of decolonisation and the psychopathology of colonization.
Fanon was born in 1925 on the Caribbean island of Martinique, then a French colony.
Fanon has been both criticized and lionized for his use and defense of revolutionary violence, and his absolute scorn for nonviolent activism.
raceandhistory.com - Frantz Fanon (1180 words)
Fanon was born in 1925, to a middle-class family in the French colony of Martinique.
Frantz Fanon was born on 20 July 1925 into a fairly typical bourgeois family in Martinique and grew up with assimilationist values which encouraged him to reject his "flness" or African heritage.
Frantz, the fourth and youngest of 4 boys, and the middle child in a total of eight, was the darkest of the family.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m