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Encyclopedia > Franklin and Marshall College
Franklin and Marshall College
Established 1787
Motto Lux et Lex (Latin)
(Light and Law)
School type Private Liberal Arts
Location Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA
President John Anderson Fry
Enrollment 1,850 undergraduate
0 graduate
Faculty 175
Student:Faculty 11:1
Curriculum 39 academic departments
Campus Urban
170 acres (1.35 million feet²)
Athletics 26 sport teams
31 sport clubs
Mascot Diplomats
Greeks 7 fraternities
2 sororities
Student Groups 100+
Address P.O. Box 3003
Lancaster, PA 17604-3003
Telephone (717) 291-3911
Homepage www.fandm.edu

Franklin and Marshall College is a four-year private co-educational liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It is the 25th-oldest institute of higher education in the United States. http://library. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Lancaster is a city located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 33rd 119,283 km² 255 km 455 km 2. ... Urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of man-made structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... An acre is an English unit of area, which is also frequently used in the United States and some Commonwealth countries. ... This article is about a foot as a unit of length. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Lancaster is a city located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ...


Since its founding in 1787, Franklin & Marshall has evolved into one of the most celebrated liberal arts colleges in the United States. It employs 175 full-time faculty members and has a student body of approximately 1,850 full-time students.


The school is often referred to in the shorthand as F&M. Its students are sometimes called "Fummers" (for "F&M-ers") or "Dips" (short "Diplomats").

Contents


History of Franklin College (18th Century)

Franklin College was chartered on June 6, 1787 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania on the site of a former brewery. It was named for Benjamin Franklin, who donated £200 to the new institution. Founded by four prominent ministers from the German Reformed Church and the Lutheran Church, in conjunction with numerous Philadelphians, the school was established as a German college whose goal was to help assimilate the German population into American culture. Its first trustees included four signers of the Declaration of Independence, three members of the Constitutional Convention and seven officers of the Revolutionary War. June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Lancaster is a city located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of the Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ... Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ...


The school's first courses were taught on July 16, 1787, with instruction taking place in both English and German making it the first bilingual college in the United States. July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The term bilingualism (from bi meaning two and lingua meaning language) can refer to rather different phenomena. ...


Franklin College was also America's first coeducational institution, with its first class of students composed of 78 men and 36 women. Among the latter was Rebecca Gratz, the first Jewish female college student in the United States. However, the coed policy was soon changed and it would take 182 years before women were again permitted to enroll in the school. Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Rebecca Gratz (March 4, 1781 - August 27, 1869) was an American educator and philanthropist. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


In July of 1789, Franklin College ran into financial difficulty as its annual tuition of four pounds was not enough to cover operating costs. Enrollment began to dwindle to just a few students and eventually the college existed as nothing more than an annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. In an effort to help the ailing school, an academy was established in 1807. For the next three decades, Franklin College and Franklin Academy managed to limp along financially, with instructors supplementing their income with private tutoring. Look up July in Wiktionary, the free dictionary July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1835, the school's Debating Society was renamed Diagnothian Literary Society at the suggestion of seminary student Samuel Reed Fisher. In June of that year, Diagnothian was divided into two friendly rivals to encourage debate. Diagnothian retained its original name, while the new society was named Goethean, in honor of German philosopher and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. The two organizations sponsored orations and debated politics, philosophy and literature. They merged together in 1955, but became separate entities again in 1989. The Diagnothian Society is the oldest student organization on campus. | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Look up June in Wiktionary, the free dictionary June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. ... Orator is a Latin word for speaker (from the Latin verb oro, meaning I speak or I pray). In ancient Rome, the art of speaking in public (Ars Oratoria) was a professional competence especially cultivated by politicians and lawyers. ... Politics is a process by which collective decisions are made within groups. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Literature is literally acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has generally come to identify a collection of texts, which in Western culture are mainly prose, both fiction and non-fiction... 1955 (MCMLV in Roman) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


History of Marshall College (19th Century)

Having grown from a Reformed Church academy, Marshall College, opened in 1836 in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. The school was named for the fourth Chief Justice of the United States John Marshall, who had died the previous year. It was founded with the belief that harmony between knowledge and will was necessary to create a well-rounded person. The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Mercersburg is a borough located in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, 73 miles (117 km) southwest of Harrisburg. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was a highly influential American statesman, lawyer, legislator and soldier who served as a Virginia Delegate, U.S. Representative, special emissary to France, United States Secretary of State and, most significantly, as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. ...


During its first year, 18 students were taught by Frederick Augustus Rauch and his assistant, Samuel A. Budd. Rauch, an acclaimed young scholar and theologian from Germany who authored the first American textbook in psychology, also served as the College’s president. Auguste Rodins The Thinker, bronze cast by Alexis Rudier, Laeken Cemetery, Brussels, Belgium. ...


The school's small, but brilliant faculty grew in both size and status with the addition of John Williamson Nevin and another German scholar, church historian Philip Schaff. Nevin became the college’s president upon Rauch’s sudden death in 1841. John Williamson Nevin (February 20, 1803 - June 6, 1886), American theologian and educationalist, was born on Herrons Branch, near Shippensburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. ... Philip Schaff (January 1, 1819-1893), was a Swiss-born, German-educated theologian and a historian of the Christian church, who, after his education, lived and taught in the United States. ...


Life at Marshall College was well-regimented. Students were required to attend morning prayers--sometimes as early as 5 a.m.--and were expected to study in their rooms for six hours a day. In addition, they were forbidden to associate with people of questionable moral character.


Marshall College quickly gained national recognition and attracted students from a large geographical area, with some coming as far away as the West Indies. However, despite being initially well-funded, Marshall College began to experience financial difficulties of its own. By the late 1840s, financial support and enthusiasm among the local community had virtually disappeared and the school was in danger of closing its doors for good. The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ...


The Merger (1853)

On December 6, 1849, Franklin College and Marshall College began to explore the possibility of a merger as a method to secure the future of both institutions. Three years later, on June 7, 1853, the combined college was formally dedicated at Lancaster's Fulton Hall. The merger created an all-male Reformed Church institution that combined the resources of both schools. James Buchanan, four years shy of becoming the 15th President of the United States, was named president of the first Franklin & Marshall board of trustees. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Fulton Hall When World War II ended in 1945 there was a dramatic increase in enrollment at Boston College, due to the returning soldiers and the opportunities afforded to them by the G.I. bill. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ...


The college’s first two presidents, Emanuel Vogel Gerhart, a Marshall College graduate, and Nevin struggled to keep the young school afloat with an inadequate endowment. But the hope of creating a reputable liberal arts institution fueled their efforts to push on. “No second- or third-rate school will do,” said Nevin at the formal dedication of the united college. “We must either have no college at all or else have one that may be in all respects worthy of the name.”


On May 16, 1856, Franklin and Marshall College dedicated its main building, "Recitation Hall." The distinctive, tall-towered structure, designed in the Gothic Revival style, was constructed on "Gallows Hill," the former site of Lancaster's public executions and the highest point of ground in the city. At the laying of the building's cornerstone in 1853, Henry Harbaugh, a Marshall College graduate and pastor of the Reformed Church of Lancaster noted that the city's lowest point was the location of the Lancaster County Prison. Harbaugh stated: "Thank God! The College stands higher than the jail. Education should be lifted up and let crime sink to the lowest depths!" Recitation Hall came to be known as Old Main and the ground as College Hill. May 16 is the 136th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (137th in leap years). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ...


Franklin and Marshall College took as its motto the Latin phrase "Lux et Lex" which translates in English to "Light and Law." This was the reverse of the Marshall College motto "Lex et Lux." While legend has it that the switch was the result of an error by an engraver, it was more likely a deliberate decision to pair the words with its founders Benjamin Franklin ("light") and John Marshall ("law"). Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of the Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was a highly influential American statesman, lawyer, legislator and soldier who served as a Virginia Delegate, U.S. Representative, special emissary to France, United States Secretary of State and, most significantly, as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. ...


The college seal depicts the profiles of Franklin and Marshall, both looking to the left. It has been often suggested that this represented the two leaders looking westward towards the (then) future expansion of the United States. Despite the fact that his name comes second, John Marshall is shown on the left of the seal and Benjamin Franklin is on the right. But Franklin's full head is shown, while Marshall's profile is cut off and far in the background. Some say that this shows the college's unspoken tendency to favor Frankin's legacy over Marshall's. This painting (circa 1872) by John Gast called American Progress is an allegorical representation of Manifest Destiny. ... John Marshall (September 24, 1755 – July 6, 1835) was a highly influential American statesman, lawyer, legislator and soldier who served as a Virginia Delegate, U.S. Representative, special emissary to France, United States Secretary of State and, most significantly, as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of the Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. ...


The Civil War Era

With the start of the American Civil War in 1861, Goethean Hall and Diagnothian Hall were used as hospitals for sick soldiers from nearby Camp Johnson, an emergency recruitment camp northwest of Lancaster. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln+ Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Lancaster is a city located in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. ...


On June 27, 1863, college officials closed the Franklin and Marshall school year early in fear of the approaching Confederate armies. Many students immediately volunteered to help burn the bridge at Wrightsville, preventing a Confederate advance across the Susquehanna River into Lancaster County. June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... The Susquehanna River is a river in the northeastern United States. ... Lancaster County is a county located in the south-central portion of the state of Pennsylvania in the Susquehanna Valley. ...


During the Battle of Gettysburg on July 1-3, 1863, college president Rev. E.V. Gerhart organized a humanitarian trip to the nearby city with 20 students. For three days, the students assisted with the medical efforts and ministered to the sick, wounded and dying soldiers and townfolk. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 83,289 75,054 Casualties 23,049 (3,155 killed, 14,529 wounded, 5,365 captured/missing) 28,000 (3,500 killed, 18,000 wounded, 6,500 captured/missing) {{{notes}}} The Battle of... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... July 3 is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 181 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ...


In 1865, James Buchanan resigned as President of the Board of Trustees, in part because of his unpopular term in the White House, which had ended in 1861. 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States of America. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


The Late 19th Century

In 1872, the Franklin and Marshall Academy, an all-male prep school opened on campus. When it closed in 1943, it was the last prep school in America to be directly affiliated with a college or university. The Academy's first building, East Hall, was constructed in 1872. A second, larger building, Hartman Hall, replaced it in 1907. Both buildings were used by the college for various purposes after the Academy folded. Hartman Hall was demolished in 1975 and East Hall followed in 1978. 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually shortened to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually shortened to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school (or high school) designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...


College Days, the first student newspaper, began publication in 1873. Later student newspapers included The College Student (1881-1914), The F&M Weekly (1891-1915), The Student Weekly (1915-1964), The Blue and The White (1990-1992) and The College Reporter (1964-present). 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ...


Oriflamme, the Franklin and Marshall College yearbook, was established in 1883. 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1887, the centennial celebration of Franklin College was held at the school. By then, over 100 students were enrolled at F&M. 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ...


1899 saw the formation of the college's first theatre group, the Franklin & Marshall Dramatic Association. The next year, it was renamed The Green Room Club. The club performed plays at Lancaster's Fulton Opera House. Because the college admitted only men, the female roles were played by local actresses. In 1937, the Green Room Theatre opened on campus. F&M alumni who have performed on the Green Room stage include Oscar-winning film director Franklin J. Schaffner and actors Roy Scheider and Treat Williams. 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Fulton Opera House was built in October 1852 when Christopher Hager constructed the 4-story Fulton Hall on the exercise yards of the original site of the Lancaster County Prison. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Franklin and Marshall College is a four-year private co-educational liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 - July 2, 1989) was an American film director. ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932) is an American actor. ... Richard Treat Williams (born December 1, 1951) is an American actor. ...


The 20th Century

The college began a rapid period of growth after World War I. Enrollment rose from around 300 students in 1920, to over 750 students by the year 1930. In 1924, the architectural firm of Klauder and Day presented a master campus plan in the Colonial Revival style. Dietz-Santee dormitory, Meyran-Franklin dormitory, the Mayser Physical Education Center, and Hensel Hall were all completed within three years. Two additional dormitories were planned at that time, but never constructed. Combatants Allies: • Serbia, • Russia, • France, • Romania, • Belgium, • British Empire and Dominions, • United States, • Italy, • ...and others Central Powers: • Germany, • Austria-Hungary, • Ottoman Empire, • Bulgaria Casualties 5 million military, 3 million civilian (full list) 3 million military, 3 million civilian (full list) World War I, also known as the First World... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Colonial Revival was a nationalistic architectural style. ...


The sesquicentennial celebration of Franklin College was held in mid-October of 1937. Student enrollment at that time was 800. A commemorative plaque celebrating the sesquicentennial of Franklin College and the signing of the United States Constitution was presented to the college by the Lancaster County Historical Society. An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


In 1939, the school began an aviation program in the new Keiper Liberal Arts Building. The Aeronautical Laboratory eventually became a government-sponsored flight school with 40 faculty members. Two airplanes were disassembled, moved into the building and reassembled on the third floor where they were used as flight simulators. 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Aviation or Air transport refers to the activities surrounding mechanical flight and the aircraft industry. ... Flight training is a course of study used when learning to pilot an aircraft. ...


By 1945, with the majority of young men fighting in World War II, the college population dwindled to just under 500 students and 28 faculty members. But the end of the war brought many new students who decided to pursue their education under the G.I. Bill. By 1946, enrollment had swelled to over 1,200 students (including four females permitted to study in the pre-med program) and there was a sudden critical shortage of faculty members. 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Combatants Allies: • Soviet Union, • UK & Commonwealth, • USA, • France/Free France, • China, • Poland, • ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Japan, • Italy, • ...and others Casualties Military dead: 18 million Civilian dead: 33 million Full list Military dead: 7 million Civilian dead: 4 million Full list World War II, also known as the Second World... The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... An image of a 1901 examination in the faculty of medicine. ...


The fifties and sixties brought more college expansion and construction to the campus including: North Museum (1953), Marshall-Buchanan Residence Hall (1956), Appel Infirmary (1959), Schnader Residence Hall (1959), Mayser Physical Education Center (1962), Benjamin Franklin Residence Halls (1964), Pfeiffer Science Complex (now Hackman Physical Science Laboratory) (1967), Grundy Observatory (1967), Whitely Psychology Laboratory (1968) and Thomas Residence Hall (1968). This article is in need of attention. ... The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


Like other academic institutions in the sixties, Franklin and Marshall experienced a series of student protests during the decade that were based on important social issues, such as the American Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. In April of 1961, students rioted in front of the President's house and Hensel Hall, burning effigies and college property in protest of administration policies. The 1960s, or The Sixties, in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom The Civil Rights Movement refers to a set of noted events and reform movements aimed at abolishing public and... Combatants Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam) United States of America South Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand the Philippines Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) National Liberation Front (Viet Cong) Strength ~1,200,000 (1968) ~420,000 (1968) Casualties South Vietnamese dead: 1,250,000+ US dead: 58,226 US wounded... Look up April in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. visited the campus on December 12, 1963. He spoke about civil rights before a capacity audience of 3,300 in Mayser Center, the school's gymnasium. Martin Luther King Jr. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


In 1965, visiting English instructor Robert Mezey was suspended after being accused of urging students to burn their draft cards. He was later reinstated. This became known as the "Mezey Affair." 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Their actions were criminal offences and once they had left the country draft dodgers could not return or they would be arrested. ...


In the spring of 1969, black students protested the final examination of the history course "The Black Experience in America." Demanding an apology from the faculty for exploitation and an "A" in the course, the students argued that no white man can test them on their "blackness." The day before the exam, the professors agreed to the apology, but still insisted that the students take the final exam. On May 22, the day of the exam, forty black students--many of whom were not enrolled in the course--blocked the entrance to the exam room in Old Main. The professors attempted to hand out the exam to the other students in the class, but the protesters confiscated them. Retreating to Goethean Hall next door, the professors and staff met to evaluate the situation. The protesters followed them to the building, blocked all doors and exits and held them hostage. They declared that they would not release the faculty members until they received an apology and immunity from punishment. The standoff lasted until midnight, when the professors agreed to allow the students to grade themselves. The students relented and released the hostages. However the college's Professional Standards Committee later overturned the decision, declaring that the professors would, in fact, have to grade the students after all. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... A hostage is a person (sometimes another entity) which is held by a captor (often a criminal abductor) in order to compel another party (relative, employer, government. ...


In 1969, Franklin and Marshall College ended its formal affiliation with the United Church of Christ, becoming a secular school. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Emblem of the UCC The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ...


Since its inception, Franklin and Marshall was an all-male institution, although Franklin College had enrolled female students and women were permitted to attend summer school classes at F&M beginning in 1942. Continuing a trend in single-sex schools across the country, the Board of Trustees announced on January 17, 1969 that it had voted to admit women to F&M, a decision that was unanimously and enthusiastically supported by male students. In the fall of 1969, 82 freshman women and 34 female transfer students were enrolled in F&M's first coeducational class. This article is about the year. ... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ...


In 1970, F&M students protested the administration's failure to rehire popular sociology instructor Anthony Lazroe and history instructor Henry Mayer. The protest, known as the "Lazroe-Mayer incident," culminated in the East Hall sit-in on April 30, where students took over the building for several hours. 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more persons nonviolently occupying an area for protest, often political, social, or economic change. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining, as the last day in April. ...


In 1976, the Steinman College Center was constructed. The building--designed by Minoru Yamasaki, architect of New York's World Trade Center--originally housed the campus bookstore and post office. Today it houses the College Reporter, the Oriflamme Yearbook, the College Entertainment Committee, the Phillips Museum of Art, Pandini's (a popular restaurant) and the campus radio station WFNM. 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... Minoru Yamasaki (December 1, 1912–February 6, 1986) was an American architect, born in Seattle, Washington, a second-generation Japanese-American. ... The World Trade Center in New York City (sometimes informally referred to as the WTC) was a complex of seven buildings designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ...


On April 29, 1976, the Green Room Theatre staged the world premiere of the John Updike play Buchanan Dying, about former President James Buchanan, a Lancaster resident and former President of the Board of Trustees. The production was directed by Edward S. Brubaker and starred Peter Vogt, an F&M alumnus. After the premiere, a reception was held at Wheatland, Buchanan's Lancaster residence. April 29 is the 119th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (120th in leap years). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1976 calendar). ... John Updike John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932) is an American writer born in Reading, Pennsylvania. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... For the economist of this name, see James M. Buchanan. ...


On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor in nearby Harrisburg, Pennsylvania experienced a partial meltdown, forcing the college to close for a short time. March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station consists of two nuclear reactors, each with its own containment building and cooling towers. ... Downtown Harrisburg Motto: Nickname: Map Political Statistics Founded c. ... A nuclear meltdown occurs when the core of a nuclear reactor melts. ...


The eighties were a prosperous time for the college. Construction projects initiated during the decade included Hartman Green (1982), French House (1984), Murray Arts House (1984), Ice Rink (1984), Spaulding Plaza (1985), the Other Room Theatre (1985), major renovations and expansions of Fackenthal Library (1983, renamed Shadek-Fackenthal Library) and Stahr Hall (1985, renamed Stager Hall, 1988) and the Black Cultural Center (1986). Millennia: 1st millennium - 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium Events and trends Computers, technology Bulletin board system popularity Popularization of personal computers, Walkmans, VHS videocassette recorders, and compact disc (CD) players Home video games become enormously popular, most notably Atari until the market crashes in 1983; the rise of Nintendo brings about... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On June 6, 1987 Franklin and Marshall College celebrated its bicentennial. June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ...


The nineties brought a major expansion to the north side of campus with the construction of College Square in (1991). The multi-use complex housed a new bookstore, laudromat, video store, restaurants and a food court. Other buildings from the decade include Weis Residence Hall (1990), International House (1990), Martin Library of the Sciences (1990) and the Alumni Sports and Fitness Center (1995). The 1990s decade refers to the years from 1990 to 1999, inclusive. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... 1995 (MCMXCV in Roman) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The 21st Century

At the turn of the twenty-first century, the college continued to grow with the addition of the Barshinger Center for Musical Arts in Hensel Hall (2000), President's House (built 1933; purchased by the college in 2002), Roschel Performing Arts Center (2003) and Writer's House (2004). (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2001-2100. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2000, Bill Cosby was chosen as commencement speaker for the graduating class and was subsequently presented with an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Cosby was so impressed with the school that he donated $100,000 to start a scholarship in honor of his deceased son Ennis. The scholarship is awarded to students who pursue their graduate studies in education at Columbia University Teachers College, Ennis' alma mater. This article is about the year 2000. ... Bill Cosby as Dr. Heathcliff Huxtable on The Cosby Show William Henry Bill Cosby, Jr. ... A scholarship is an award of access to an institution or a financial aid award for an individual (a scholar) for the purposes of furthering their education. ... Ennis William Cosby (1970 - January 16, 1997) was the son of actor Bill Cosby and Camille Hanks. ... Columbia University, legally known as Columbia University in the City of New York, and incorporated under the name Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, is an Ivy League university located in New York City. ...


In 2003 the school celebrated the sesquicentennial of the union between Franklin College and Marshall College. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An anniversary is a day that commemorates an event that occurred on the same day of the year some time in the past. ...


History of F&M Sports

Sports have been an active part of Franklin and Marshall since its inception. The school's sports teams are called the Diplomats. Many of the teams compete in the Centennial Conference. Men's intercollegiate competition is in thirteen sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, lacrosse, soccer, squash, swimming, tennis, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, and wrestling. Women's intercollegiate competition is in 13 sports: basketball, cross country, field hockey, golf, lacrosse, soccer, softball, squash, swimming, tennis, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, and volleyball. F&M competes in NCAA Division III for all varsity sports except wrestling, which is Division I, and men's and women's squash, which are nondivisional. F&M also boasts several student run clubs, most notably Men's and Women's Rugby. The Centennial Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Maryland and Pennsylvania. ... Baseball is a team sport in which a player on one team (the pitcher) attempts to throw a hard, fist-sized ball past a player on the other team (the batter), who attempts to hit the baseball with a tapered, smooth, cylindrical stick called a bat. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 Basketball is a sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Football is the name given to a number of different, but related, team sports. ... Golf (gowf in Scots) is a sport where individual players or teams hit a ball into a hole using various clubs, and is one of the few ball games that does not use a fixed standard playing area. ... The Dive Shot. A womens lacrosse player carries the ball past a defender. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Squash racquet and ball Squash is an indoor racquet sport which was, until recently, called Squash Rackets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball used in its parent game Racquets or Rackets--see below). ... A breaststroke swimmer A dog swimming Swimming describes any method by which living creatures move themselves through water apart from walking on the bottom. ... Tennis ball This article is about the sport. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... FILA Greatest Wrestler of 20th Century (Greco-Roman) Alexander Karelin throws Olympian Jeff Blatnick with his Karelin Lift Andrell Durden (top) and Edward Harris grapple for position during the All-Marine Wrestle Offs. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Softball is a team sport in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (28 to 30. ... Volleyball is one of the most popular sports to play in the world. ... Division III consists of institutions who recognize that collegiate athletics can be an integral part of the educational process. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


In 1866, the student-run Alpha Club sponsored the college's first baseball game. 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Baseball is a team sport in which a player on one team (the pitcher) attempts to throw a hard, fist-sized ball past a player on the other team (the batter), who attempts to hit the baseball with a tapered, smooth, cylindrical stick called a bat. ...


In 1887, the first football team was organized by Seminary student Miles O. Noll. Franklin and Marshall College was defeated 9-0 by the York YMCA. 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Football is the name given to a number of different, but related, team sports. ...


Distler House, the school's first gymnasium, was constructed in 1891. It contained a bowling alley, indoor running track, and gymnastic equipment. Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops Gym, a shortened form of gymnasium, refers to facilities intended for indoor sports or exercise. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bowling ball and two pins Ten-pin bowling lane Bowling is a game in which players attempt to score points by rolling a ball along a surface to knock down objects called pins. ...


The "New Athletic Field" was constructed in 1895 with the assistance of $1,500 from Henry S. Williamson. It was later renamed "Williamson Field." A concrete grandstand was added in 1922 at a cost of $10,000. 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1900 the first basketball game was played. The opposing team was Millersville Normal School. 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 Basketball is a sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ...


F&M's football team finally defeated the University of Pennsylvania in 1915. The score was 10-0. Football is the name given to a number of different, but related, team sports. ... The University of Pennsylvania (Penn is the moniker used by the university itself; UPenn is also correct, though less common) is a private, nonsectarian research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


1924 saw the college's first wrestling match. 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Mayser Physical Education Center, the college's second gymnasium, was opened in 1927. Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops Gym, a shortened form of gymnasium, refers to facilities intended for indoor sports or exercise. ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1950, the football team celebrated an undefeated season. 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Football is the name given to a number of different, but related, team sports. ...


In 1995, the Alumni Sports and Fitness Center, the school's third gymnasium opened on the site of the college's former ice rink. 1995 (MCMXCV in Roman) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops Gym, a shortened form of gymnasium, refers to facilities intended for indoor sports or exercise. ...


History of F&M Greek System

Chi Phi, founded on December 1, 1854, remains the longest continuously-running fraternity at F&M (and in the country) and the only one with a fraternity house actually on the campus grounds. In 1929, through a special lease agreement with the college, the chapter built its house on the college campus at 603 Race Avenue. The house was dedicated and opened in 1929, during the chapter's 75th anniversary celebration. During World War II, with school and fraternity attendance down, the house was converted to a temporary infirmary. In 1998, due to a series of disagreements with the college, the lease was terminated and the fraternity was evicted. On February 7, 2001, after three years, Chi Phi renegotiated a new lease with F&M and they reoccupied the house the following August. The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is a college social fraternity in the United States founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest college social Greek-letter society and only college Greek-letter society to have... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at Lafayette College. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... August is the eighth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ...


In 1978, the school's first sorority--Sigma Sigma Sigma--was chartered. In 2005, the chapter became inactive. 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma, is a national women’s sorority with membership totaling over 80,000 members. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In April of 1988, the College's Board of Trustees voted to no longer officially recognize the school's fraternities and sororities. This was known as "derecognition." At the time, three of the school's fraternities had recently lost their national charters due to various offenses. In an effort to repair the system, the college administration proposed eight specific reforms to the Greek Counsel, which were ultimately rejected by all of the organizations. The result was derecognition. Derecognition was highly unpopular with the student body, but it served to remove the college from any liability associated with hazing and underage alcohol abuse, issues that were in the national public eye at that time. The experiment met with mixed results. Despite the decree, the Greek System continued--albeit unofficially--and the college kept a watchful eye on how it developed without financial or administrative support. No Greek chapters were closed during this time and membership was generally not affected. But after several years unsupervised, a small number of fraternities struggled with health code violations, fires and one unfortunate accidental alcohol-related death. Owing to several factors, including dwindling financial support from fraternity and sorority alumni and legitimate concerns about student academics, health and safety, the college announced on May 19, 2004 that it would reinstate a new, revised Greek System beginning on September 1, 2004 after a 16 year absence. Look up April in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... While the terms fraternity (from the Latin word frater, meaning: brother) and sorority may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, including the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, and the Shriners, in the United States and Canada fraternities and sororities are most commonly known... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... In the most general sense, a liability is anything that is a hindrance, or puts one at a disadvantage. ... The Glenbrook North High School hazing incident concerned many people worldwide Hazing is often ritualistic harassment, abuse or humiliation with requirements to perform meaningless tasks; sometimes as a way of initiation into a social group. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


List of Fraternties at F&M

The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is a college social fraternity in the United States founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest college social Greek-letter society and only college Greek-letter society to have... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... ΦΚΣ (Phi Kappa Sigma) is an international college fraternity. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... // Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity Phi Sigma Kappa is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Delta Sigma Phi (ΔΣΦ, also known as DSP, Delta Sig or in Michigan, Delt Sig) is a fraternity established at the City College of New York in 1899 and is a charter member of the North-American Interfraternity Conference. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nicknames: Lambda Chis, Choppers, Lamb Chops Founded November 2, 1909 Founder Warren A. Cole Greek Letters ΛΧΑ Headquarters Indianapolis, IN Official Colors Purple, Green, and Gold Official Flower White Tudor Rose Symbols Cross and Crescent Philanthropy North American Food Drive The Coat of Arms of Lambda Chi Alpha Motto: Vir Quisque... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Official Name Sigma Pi Fraternity, International Founded February 26, 1897 at Vincennes University International Headquarters Brentwood, TN Grand Council Grand Sage John Kitch Grand Second Counselor Larry Rovira Grand Third Counselor George Hakim Grand Fourth Counselor Chris Brown Grand First Counselor Ed Levesque Grand Herald John Michelich Past Grand Sage... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... ΦΚΤ (Phi Kappa Tau) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... nickname: Kappa Sig Founded December 10, 1869 International Headquarters Charlottesville, VA Official Colors Scarlet, White, and Emerald green Official Flower Lily of the valley Official Jewel Pearl Official Badge Official Crest ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with at least 300 chapters and colonies in North America. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Zeta Beta Tau (ZBT, brothers of whom are sometimes nicknamed Zebes) is a non-sectarian national fraternity founded by Richard J. H. Gottheil, a professor of languages at Columbia University and a leader in the early American Zionist movement. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pi Lambda Phi (ΠΛΦ) is a college social fraternity founded by Frederick Manfred Werner, Louis Samter Levy, and Henry Mark Fisher at Yale University in 1895. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

List of Sororities at F&M

Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma, is a national women’s sorority with membership totaling over 80,000 members. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alpha Phi(ΑΦ)is a fraternity for woman founded at Syracuse University on September 30, 1872. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) Fraternity is the largest womens fraternal organization in the world with 300,000 initiates and 170 collegiate chapters. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ...

F&M Presidents

Franklin College:

  • Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1787-1815)
  • Operated as an academy by Board of Trustees (1816-1853)

Marshall College: 1787 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

  • Dr. Frederick Augustus Rauch (1836-1841)
  • Rev. John Williamson Nevin (1841-1853)

Franklin and Marshall College: Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... take you to calendar). ... take you to calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

  • Rev. Emanuel Vogel Gerhart '38 (1854-1866)
  • Dr. John Williamson Nevin (1866-1876)
  • Rev. Thomas Gilmore Apple '50 (1877-1889)
  • Rev. John Summers Stahr '67 (1889-1909)
  • Dr. Henry Harbaugh Apple '89 (1910-1935)
  • Dr. John Ahlum Schaeffer '04 (1935-1941)
  • Dr. H. M.J. Klein '93 (1941) (acting president)
  • Theodore August Distler (1941-1954)
  • William Webster Hall (1955-1957)
  • Dr. Frederick deWolf Bolman, Jr. (1957-1962)
  • Anthony R. Appel '35 (1962) (resigned after one week)
  • G. Wayne Glick (1962) (acting president)
  • Keith Spalding (1963-1983)
  • James Lawrence Powell (1983-1988)
  • A. Richard Kneedler '65 (1988-2002)
  • John Anderson Fry (2002-present)

1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1877 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... -1... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV in Roman) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ...

Famous alumni

George Frederick Baer (1842-1914) was the US lawyer, was the CEO of Reading Company. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1884 map of the Pennsylvania, Reading and Lehigh Valley Railroads The Reading Railroad (AAR reporting mark RDG), officially known as the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, operated in southeast Pennsylvania and neighboring states. ... Major Richard D. Winters (born January 21, 1918) is a retired officer of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) attached to the 101st Airborne Division of the United States Army during the Second World War. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... The Medal of Honor (Sometimes incorrectly referred to as the Congressional Medal of Honor) [1] is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Franklin James Schaffner (May 30, 1920 – July 2, 1989) was an American film director. ... This article is about the year. ... Patton is a 1970 biographical film which tells the story of General George Pattons commands during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden and Michael Bates. ... Planet of the Apes is a novel by Pierre Boulle, originally published in 1963 in French as La Planète des Singes. ... Glen Tetley (b. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932) is an American actor. ... 1955 (MCMLV in Roman) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the 1975 motion picture. ... All That Jazz is a 1979 musical film and semi-autobiographical fantasy by and about Bob Fosse. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with William H. Gray, III. (Discuss) William Herbert Gray III (August 20, 1941-) is the president and chief executive officer of the United Negro College Fund. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... A Congressman or Congresswoman (generically, Congressperson) is a politician who is a member of a Congress. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 33rd 119,283 km² 255 km 455 km 2. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth M. Duberstein (born April 21, 1944) served as U.S. President Ronald Reagans White House Chief of Staff from 1988 to 1989. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... It has been suggested that Assistant to the President of the United States be merged into this article or section. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... James Lapine (born January 10, 1949 in Mansfield, Ohio) is an Jewish-American director and librettist. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... Listen to this article (help) Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... Sunday in the Park with George is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Lapine. ... Into the Woods is an award-winning musical featuring a score by Stephen Sondheim and book by James Lapine. ... Richard Treat Williams (born December 1, 1951) is an American actor. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1973 calendar). ... Hair is a 1979 film based on the musical of the same name. ... Prince of the City is a 1981 film about a police officer who has to expose corruption in exchange for not being prosecuted himself. ... Everwood is a popular prime time television drama which airs in the United States on the WB network. ... William Scott Ritter, Jr. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) was a United Nations organisation performing arms inspections in Iraq after the Gulf War. ... Kenneth B. Mehlman (born 1967 in Baltimore, Maryland) is the chair of the Republican National Committee. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Alex Nackman Summary ALEX NACKMAN PHOTO Alex Nackman (born October 20, 1983) is a New York City based singer/songwriter/guitarist. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Roots are an influential Philadelphia-based hip hop group, known for innovative lyrics and live instrumentation. ... The Pat McGee Band is a rock band from Richmond, Virginia. ...

External links

  • Official University Website
  • Henry Harbaugh online


Centennial Conference

Bryn Mawr | Dickinson | Franklin & Marshall | Gettysburg | Haverford | Johns Hopkins | McDaniel | Muhlenberg | Swarthmore | Ursinus | Washington Col. Image File history File links CConLogo. ... The Centennial Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Maryland and Pennsylvania. ... Bryn Mawr is also the name of an official neighborhood of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Dickinson College is a private liberal arts college in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... Gettysburg College Gettysburg College is a private four-year liberal arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania. ... The Johns Hopkins University is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... McDaniel College is a private college of the liberal arts and sciences in Westminster, near Baltimore, Maryland, USA with a branch college in Budapest, Hungary Number of students As of 2004 there are 1,600 students from 23 states and 19 countries; 45 percent are men, 55 percent are women. ... Muhlenberg College: Haas College Center, central lawn, Mark di Suveros Victor’s Lament Muhlenberg College is a private liberal arts college founded in 1848. ... Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college in the United States, with an enrollment of about 1450 students. ... Ursinus College is a small coeducational liberal arts college in Collegeville, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania with a high percentage of graduates who go on to attend law and medical schools throughout the United States. ... Washington College is a private, selective, independent liberal arts college located on a 112 acre (453,000 m²) campus in Chestertown, Maryland on the Delmarva Peninsula. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Franklin & Marshall College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3581 words)
Franklin College was also America's first coeducational institution, with its first class of students composed of 78 men and 36 women.
Oriflamme, the Franklin and Marshall College yearbook, was established in 1883.
A commemorative plaque celebrating the sesquicentennial of Franklin College and the signing of the United States Constitution was presented to the college by the Lancaster County Historical Society.
Franklin and Marshall College - definition of Franklin and Marshall College in Encyclopedia (2857 words)
Franklin and Marshall College is a four-year private co-educational liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.
Like other academic institutions in the sixties, Franklin and Marshall experienced a series of student protests during the decade that were based on important social issues, such as the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War.
Since its inception, Franklin and Marshall permitted only male students, although Franklin College had occasionally allowed female students to enroll and women were permitted to attend summer school classes beginning in 1942.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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