FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Frankfurt am Main" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Frankfurt am Main

Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth largest city in Germany. Situated on the Main river, it has a population of approximately 650,000 (1.8 million in Greater Frankfurt and about 5 million in its metropolitan area). Germany is a federation of 16 states called Länder (singular Land, which may be translated as country) or unofficially Bundesländer (singular Bundesland, German federal state). ... With an area of 21,110 km² and just over six million inhabitants, Hesse (German Hessen) is one of Germanys sixteen federal states (Bundesländer). ... The Main (pronounced in German like the English word mine) is a river in Germany, 524 km in length, and one of the more voluminous tributaries of the Rhine river. ... The Frankfurt Rhine Main Area, often referred to as Rhine Main Area or Greater Frankfurt is a Metropolitan Area located in central western Germany, that encompasses three federal states: Hesse, Rhineland-Palatinate and Bavaria. ...


Among English speakers it is commonly known as simply "Frankfurt", though Germans more frequently call it by its full name in order to distinguish it from the other Frankfurt in Germany, Frankfurt an der Oder. It was once called Frankfort-on-the-Main in English: a direct translation of Frankfurt am Main. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Frankfurt (Oder) [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is a town in Brandenburg, Germany, located on the river Oder, on the German-Polish border, directly opposite to the city of Słubice. ... Frankfort is the name of several places: Frankfort, Illinois Frankfort, Indiana Frankfort, Kentucky Frankfort, Michigan Village of Frankfort, New York Town of Frankfort, New York Frankfort, Ohio Frankfort, Wisconsin Frankfort, South Africa Today, Frankfurt, the name of two cities in Germany, is known as that in English. ...

The skyline of Frankfurt am Main
Contents

5.1 Cathedral
5.2 Römer
5.3 Saint Paul's Church
5.4 Opera
5.5 Other constructions
The skyline of Frankfurt am Main. ... The skyline of Frankfurt am Main. ...

Introduction

The skyline of Frankfurt at night

Frankfurt is the German capital that never was. The city has been at the political center of Germany for centuries. From 855-1792 Frankfurt was the electoral city for the German Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation which ultimately failed to establish a central government over all of Germany. In 1848/49 the city on the River Main was the revolutionary capital and the seat of the first democratically elected German parliament. The revolution failed, and it was not before 1949 that Frankfurt lost out the parliamentary election for the status of West German capital by only one vote to Bonn (near Cologne), which was chosen mainly because of its proximity to the home of the first West German chancellor Konrad Adenauer. After the Berlin Wall came down in 1989 and German reunification in 1990, Berlin was the obvious choice for German capital. Download high resolution version (1136x852, 451 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1136x852, 451 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... West Germany was the informal but almost universally used name for the Federal Republic of Germany from 1949 until 1990, during which years the Federal Republic did not yet include East Germany. ... Bonn is a city in Germany (Population (2004 est): 313,605 ; the 19th largest city in Germany), in the Bundesland of North Rhine-Westphalia, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine. ... Cologne skyline at night. ... Konrad Adenauer (January 5, 1876–April 19, 1967) was a German statesman. ... Berlin Wall on November 16, 1989 The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a long barrier separating West Berlin from East Berlin and the surrounding territory of East Germany. ... German reunification (Deutsche Wiedervereinigung) took place on October 3, 1990, when the areas of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR - in English often called East Germany) were incorporated into The Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (FRG). ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Berlin (pronounced: , German ) is the capital of Germany and its largest city, with 3,426,000 inhabitants (as of January 2005); down from 4. ...


The three pillars of Frankfurt's economy are finance, trade fairs, and transport; it is the transport hub of Germany. Frankfurt has been Germany's financial capital for centuries, and is the richest city in Europe. The Frankfurt Stock Exchange is Germany's largest, the site of 85% of Germany's turnover in stocks, and one of the world's biggest. Frankfurt is also the home of the European Central Bank and the German Bundesbank, as well as a large number of big commercial banks, notably Deutsche Bank, Dresdner Bank and Commerzbank. Many large trade fairs also call Frankfurt home, notably Messe Frankfurt. World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... The Frankfurt Stock Exchange (FWB, German: Deutsche Börse) is located in Frankfurt, Germany and is owned by Deutsche Börse Group. ... The European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany is the central bank of the eurozone, in charge of monetary policy for the 12 countries that use the new euro currency. ... The Deutsche Bundesbank is the central bank of Germany and a part of the European System of Central Banks. ... Deutsche Bank AG (NYSE: DB) (German for German Bank) is a multinational bank operating worldwide and employing almost 70,000 people (2004). ... Dresdner Bank is one of Germanys largest banking corporations and is located in Frankfurt. ... Commerzbank AG is Germanys third-largest bank after Deutsche Bank and HypoVereinsbank. ...


During World War II, Frankfurt was heavily bombed, though the city recovered relatively quickly due to the headquarters of the American occupying power. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Frankfurt is often called "Bankfurt" or "Mainhattan" (derived from the local Main River). Yet not by the habitants of Frankfurt who rather call their city "The smallest metropolis of the world". It is one of only three European cities that have a significant number of high-rise skyscrapers. With 9 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters (492 feet) in 2004, Frankfurt is second behind Paris (La Défense and Montparnasse: 12 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters, not counting the Eiffel Tower), but ahead of London (Canary Wharf and City: 8 skyscrapers taller than 150 meters). The city of Frankfurt contains the tallest skyscraper in Europe, the Commerzbank Tower. For other uses, see Main (disambiguation). ... World map showing location of Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... Taipei 101, the worlds tallest skyscraper by roof height on high rise. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... La Défense, the new skyline of Paris La Défense is a district of high-rise offices, apartment blocks and shopping complexes over part of the communes of Nanterre, Courbevoie and Puteaux (all in the Hauts-de-Seine département), to the west of Paris. ... The Montparnasse Tower, which at 209m was the tallest building in Western Europe when it was built. ... The Eiffel Tower (French: la Tour Eiffel) is a metallic tower built on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France, and is nowadays the most famous landmark and symbol of Paris. ... The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster which contains Big Ben London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Canary Wharf - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article is about a small section of central London. ... View on Commerzbank Tower from the top of the Main Tower Commerzbank Tower is a skyscraper located in Frankfurt, Germany. ...


Frankfurt is renowned for its finance industry, on a par with London and Paris, as well as for its central location in Western Europe, surrounded by the most populous areas of Europe. It has a first-class infrastructure and a major international airport: Frankfurt International Airport. It is the second or third-busiest in Europe, depending on the data used. Passenger traffic at in 2004 was 51.1 Million, second in Europe behind London Heathrow Airport (63,487,136), almost in a tie with Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport (48,220,436). Frankfurt International Airport (German: Rhein-Main-Flughafen or Flughafen Frankfurt am Main) is located in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA airport code: LHR, ICAO airport code: EGLL, and often simply Heathrow) is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... Charles de Gaulle International Airport (French: A roport de Roissy-Charles de Gaulle), also known as Roissy Airport (or just Roissy in French), serving Paris, is one of Europes principal aviation centers, as well as Frances main international airport. ...


Frankfurt is also home to many cultural and educational institutions, among them Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, its university, and many museums, most of them lined up along the Main river on the Museumsufer (museum embankment), and a large botanical garden, the Palmengarten. The best known museums are the Städelsches Kunstinstitut und Städtische Galerie, called Städel, and the Naturmuseum Senckenberg. The Museum für moderne Kunst (Museum of Modern Art) and Schirn Kunsthalle (Schirn Art Gallery) are also notable. The Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main (commonly called the University of Frankfurt) was founded in 1914 as a Citizens University, which means that while it was a State university of Prussia, it had been founded and financed by the wealthy and active liberal citizenry of Frankfurt am... The Main (pronounced in German like the English word mine) is a river in Germany, 524 km in length, and one of the more voluminous tributaries of the Rhine river. ...


History

In the area of the Römer Roman settlements were established, probably in the first century, with some artefacts remaining. Also, the city district Bonames has a name probably dating back to Roman times, Bonames is thought to be derived from bona me(n)sa. Nida (Heddernheim) was a Roman civitas capital.


The name of Frankfurt on the Main river is derived from the Franconofurt of the Germanic tribe of the Franks; Furt (cf. English ford) denotes a low point passage across a stream or river. Alemanni and Franks lived there and by 794 Charlemagne presided over an imperial assembly and church synod, at which Franconofurd (-furt -vurd) is first mentioned. However, since frank is also an old German word for frei (meaning "free"), Frankfurt was a "free ford," an opportunity to cross the river Main without paying bridgetoll. The Main (pronounced in German like the English word mine) is a river in Germany, 524 km in length, and one of the more voluminous tributaries of the Rhine river. ... The Franks were one of several west Germanic tribes who entered the late Roman Empire from Frisia as foederati and established a lasting realm in an area that covers most of modern-day France and the region of Franconia in Germany, forming the historic kernel of both these two modern... cf. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A ford is a section of water (most commonly a section of a river) that is sufficiently shallow as to be traversable by wading. ... The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, are a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius, under the year 213. ... Events Kyoto becomes the Japanese capital. ... A Frankish king, like Charlemagne, (center) depicted in the Sacramentary of Charles the Bald (about 870) Charlemagne (c. ... The Main (pronounced in German like the English word mine) is a river in Germany, 524 km in length, and one of the more voluminous tributaries of the Rhine river. ...

In the Holy Roman Empire, Frankfurt was one of the most important cities. Since 855 the German kings and emperors were elected in Frankfurt, and then crowned in Aachen. Since 1562 the kings/emperors were also crowned in Frankfurt, Maximilian II being the first one. This tradition ended in 1792, when Franz II was elected. He was crowned, on purpose, on Bastille Day, July 14, the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille. The elections and coronations took place in the cathedral St. Bartholomäus, known as the Kaiserdom (en: Emperors Cathedral), or in its predecessors. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ... Events Louis II succeeds Lothar as western emperor. ... The following list of German Kings and Emperors is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... Map of Germany showing Aachen Aachen (French Aix-la-Chapelle) is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, on the border with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km to the west of Cologne, and the westernmost city in Germany, at 50°46′ N 6°6′ E. Population: 256,605 (2003). ... Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II Maximilian II of the Habsburg dynasty was born in 1527 at Vienna and died in 1576 in Regensburg. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Francis II Francis I Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor, who may also be referred to as Francis von Habsburg or Emperor Franz I of Austria (February 12, 1768 - March 2, 1835) was the last Holy Roman Emperor, ruling from 1792 until August 6, 1806, when the Empire was disbanded. ... Bastille Day is the French national holiday, celebrated on July 14th of each year. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... The storming of the Bastille on July 14, 1789 was an important development in, and later a symbol of, the French Revolution. ...


The Frankfurter Messe (en: Frankfurt trade fair) was first mentioned in 1150. In 1240, Emperor Friedrich II. granted an Imperial privilege to its visitors, meaning they would be protected by the Empire. Since 1478, book trade fairs are held in Frankfurt, the Frankfurter Buchmesse still is the most important in Germany and, some might say, the world. Frederick II (left) meets al-Kamil (right). ...


In 1372 Frankfurt became a Reichsstadt (en:Imperial city), i.e. directly subordinate to the emperor and not to a king or a local nobleman. In the Holy Roman Empire, an Imperial Free City (in German: Freie Reichsstadt) was a city formally responsible to the Emperor only — as opposed to the majority of cities in the Empire, which belonged to a territory and were thus governed by one of the many princes and dukes of... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ...


Frankfurt managed to remain neutral during the Thirty Years' War, but it suffered nonetheless from the plague that was brought to the city by refugees. After the end of the war Frankfurt regained its wealth. The victory of Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631) The Thirty Years War was a conflict fought between the years 1618 and 1648, principally in the Central European territory of the Holy Roman Empire, but also involving most of the major continental powers. ... Plague redirects here. ...


In the Napoleonic Wars Frankfurt was occupied or cannonaded several times by French troops. The Grand Duchy of Frankfurt, a vassal state of France, remained a short episode that lasted only from 1810 to 1813. The Congress of Vienna dissolved this entity, and Frankfurt entered the newly founded German Confederation as a free city. It became the seat of the Bundestag which was the parliament of the German Confederation. Napoleonic Wars are the wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule of France. ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from October 1, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... The German Confederation (German Deutscher Bund) was a loose association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ...


After the ill-fated revolution of 1848, Frankfurt was home to the first German National Assembly (Nationalversammlung), which resided in St. Paul's Church (Paulskirche) (see German Confederation for details) and was opened on May 18th, 1848. The institution failed in 1849 when the Prussian king declared that he wouldn't accept "a crown from the gutter". In the year of its existence the assembly had developed a common constitution for a unified Germany with the Prussian king as its monarch. Preliminaries Germany at the time of the Revolutions of 1848 was a collection of over 30 states loosely bound together in the German Confederation after the Congress of Vienna in 1815. ... The Frankfurt Parliament is the name of the German National Assembly founded during the Revolutions of 1848 that tried to unite Germany in a democratic way. ... The German Confederation (German Deutscher Bund) was a loose association of Central European states created by the Congress of Vienna in 1815 to organize the surviving states of the Holy Roman Empire, which had been abolished in 1806. ...


Frankfurt lost its independence in 1866. The Austro-Prussian War was over, and Prussia annexed several smaller states, among them the city of Frankfurt. The Prussian administration incorporated Frankfurt into its province of Hesse-Nassau. The formerly independent towns of Bornheim and Bockenheim were incorporated in 1890. 1866 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Austro-Prussian War (also called the Seven Weeks War or the German Civil War) was a war fought between Austria and Prussia in 1866 that resulted in Prussian dominance in Germany. ... The Prussian province of Hesse-Nassau (German Hessen-Nassau) was created in 1868 as a consequence of the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 by combining the previously independent Electorate of Hesse (Hesse-Kassel), the Duchy of Nassau, the Free Imperial City of Frankfurt, areas gained from the Kingdom of Bavaria... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1914, the citizens of Frankfurt founded the University of Frankfurt, later called Johann Wolfgang Goethe University. This is the only civic foundation of a university in Germany; it is today one of Germany's largest. 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main (commonly called the University of Frankfurt) was founded in 1914 as a Citizens University, which means that while it was a State university of Prussia, it had been founded and financed by the wealthy and active liberal citizenry of Frankfurt am...


During the Nazi era the synagogues of Frankfurt were destroyed. The city of Frankfurt was severely bombed in World War II. After the end of the war Frankfurt became a part of the newly founded state of Hessen. Frankfurt was the original choice for the capital of West Germany, they even went as far as constructing a new parliament building, which was never used for its intended purpose and is now a TV studio. In the end, Konrad Adenauer (the first post-war Chancellor) preferred the tiny city of Bonn, for the most part because it was close to his hometown, but also for another reason; many other prominent politicians opposed the choice of Frankfurt out of concern that Frankfurt, one of the largest German cities and a former center of the old German dominated Holy Roman Empire, would be accepted as a "permanent" capital of the federal republic - thereby weakening the West German population's support for reunification and eventually returning the capital city to Berlin. Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... A synagogue (from Greek συναγωγη, transliterated sunagoge, place of assembly literally meeting, assembly) is a Jewish house of prayer and study. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Konrad Adenauer (January 5, 1876–April 19, 1967) was a German statesman. ... Bonn is a city in Germany (Population (2004 est): 313,605 ; the 19th largest city in Germany), in the Bundesland of North Rhine-Westphalia, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine. ...


Twinning

Frankfurt is twinned with This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the unrelated concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

}|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Official Flag]]|Coat Image=[[Image:{{{Coat Image}}}|135px|City of Toronto, Ontario Coat of Arms]]}} {{Canadian City/Disable Field={{{Disable Motto Link}}}}} Motto: Diversity Our Strength {{Canadian City/Location Image is:{{{Location Image Type}}}|[[Image:{{{Location Image}}}|thumbnail|250px|City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Location. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Budapest (pronounced or ), the capital city of Hungary and the countrys principal political, industrial, commercial and transportation centre, has more than 1. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: none Voivodship Lesser Poland Municipal government Rada miasta Kraków Mayor Jacek Majchrowski Area 326,8 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 757,500 (2004 est. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Granada is a city in Nicaragua, Central America, located at 11. ... 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location within China CITIC Plaza Guangzhou fireworks display at night Guangzhou (Simplified Chinese: 广州; Traditional Chinese: 廣州; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-chou; Jyutping: Gwong2zau1; Yale: Gwóngjaū) is the capital of the Guangdong Province in southern China. ... 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City motto: Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. ... 1960 was a leap year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Location within Italy Piazza della Scala Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed of Italian regions. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... Prague (Praha in Czech) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

People born in Frankfurt

Charles the Bald - Detail from a painting in the First Bible of Charles the Bald, painted ca. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (pronounced [gø tə]) (August 28, 1749 – March 22, 1832) was a German writer, humanist, scientist, and philosopher. ... Bettina von Arnim (4 April 1785, Frankfurt am Main – 20 January 1859, Berlin), born as Elisabeth Catharina Ludovica Magdalena Brentano, was a German writer and novelist. ... Otto Hahn (March 8, 1879 – July 28, 1968) was a German chemist. ... Erich Fromm Erich Fromm (March 23, 1900 – March 18, 1980) was an internationally renowned German-American psychologist and humanistic philosopher. ... Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg Theodor Ludwig Wiesengrund Adorno (September 11, 1903 – August 6, 1969) was a German sociologist, philosopher, musicologist and composer. ... Cover of the diarys Definitive Edition, 1995. ... Martin Lawrence (born April 16, 1965) is an African-American actor, comedian, and television producer. ... Mayer Amschel Rothschild, born February 23, 1744 in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany – died there on September 19, 1812 was the founder of the Rothschild family banking empire that would become one of the most successful business families in history. ... Adolf Schreyer (1828-1899), German painter, was born at Frankfort-on-Main. ... Friedrich Karl von Savigny Friedrich Karl von Savigny (February 21, 1779 - 25 October 1861) was a German jurist. ...

Sights

Frankfurt Cathedral

Download high resolution version (600x822, 155 KB) Frankfurt Cathedral Source: [1] Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Melkom This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (600x822, 155 KB) Frankfurt Cathedral Source: [1] Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Melkom This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Cathedral

The Cathedral Saint Bartholomeus (Dom Sankt Bartholomäus) is a Gothic construction which was built in the 14th and 15th century on the foundation of an earlier church from the Merovingian time. It is the main church of Frankfurt. From 1356 on the kings of the Holy Roman Empire were elected in this church, and from 1562 to 1792 the emperors were crowned here. Michelangelos The Last Judgement shows Saint Bartholomew holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. ... Gothic architecture characterizes any of the styles of European architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, in use throughout Europe during the high and late medieval period, from the 12th century onwards. ... For other uses of the term Merovingian, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... This page is about the Germanic empire. ...


Since the 18th century Saint Bartholomeus has been called "the cathedral" by the people although it has never been a bishop's seat. In 1867 the cathedral was destroyed by a fire and rebuilt in its present style. The height of the cathedral is 95 m.


Römer

Enlarge
Römer

The name of the town hall means "Roman". It is in fact nine houses which were acquired by the city council in 1405 from a wealthy merchant family. The middle house became the town hall and was later connected with the neighbouring buildings. In the upper floor there is the Kaisersaal ("Emperor's Hall") where the newly crowned emperors held their banquets. Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 503 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 503 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events Early feminist Christine de Pizan writes The Book of the City of Ladies Erection of Bath Abbey (-- 1499) Publication of Bellifortis by Konrad Kyeser (book on military technology) Births October 18 - Pope Pius II Gjergj Kastriot Skanderbeg, Albanias national hero Deaths February 14 - Timur (aka Tamerlane), Mongol monarch...


The Römer was destroyed in World War II, but rebuilt afterwards.

St. Paul

Frankfurt, Saint Paul Paulskirche in Frankfurt, Germany Photographed by A. Darmochwal Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Sansculotte This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Frankfurt, Saint Paul Paulskirche in Frankfurt, Germany Photographed by A. Darmochwal Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Sansculotte This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...

Saint Paul's Church

Saint Paul's Church (Paulskirche) is a rather new church. It was established in 1789 as a Protestant church but not finished until 1833. Its importance has its root in the Frankfurt Parliament which was held here in 1848/49 in order to develop a constitution for a united Germany. The institution failed because the monarchs of Prussia and Austria did not want lose power; in 1849 Prussian troops ended the democratic experiment by force of arms, and the parliament was dissolved. Afterwards the building was used for church services again. 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Frankfurt Parliament is the name of the German National Assembly founded during the Revolutions of 1848 that tried to unite Germany in a democratic way. ...


Saint Paul was completely destroyed in World War II but quickly rebuilt. Today it is not used as a sacral building anymore but for exhibitions. In 1963 US president John F. Kennedy made a speech in Saint Paul during his visit to Frankfurt. 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth: May 29, 1917 Place of birth: Brookline, Massachusetts Date of death: November 22, 1963 Place of death: Dallas, Texas First...


Opera

Opera house

The famous opera house of Frankfurt (Alte Oper) was built in 1880 by the architect Richard Lucae. It was one of the major opera houses of Germany until its destruction in World War II. It was not until 1981 that the old opera was eventually rebuilt and opened. Today it is a concert hall while operas are performed in a building from 1951. Frankfurt Opera Source: Library of Congress Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Melkom This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Frankfurt Opera Source: Library of Congress Licence: Public Domain Originally uploaded to German Wikipedia by user Melkom This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Other constructions

  • Henninger Turm (silo with observation deck, unfortunately closed for visitors)
  • Europaturm (unfortunately closed for visitors)
"Hammering Man" in front of the skyscraper 'Messeturm'

See also: Frankfurt International Airport, Frankfurt-Hahn Airport, Frankfurt School, Frankfurt Transit The Henninger Turm Skyline of Frankfurt with the Henninger Turm The Henninger Turm (tower) is a grain silo with a storage capacity of 16,000 tons of barley. ... Europaturm The Europaturm (or European Tower) is a 337. ... Download high resolution version (676x990, 124 KB)Frankfurt scenery from zh wiki File links The following pages link to this file: Frankfurt ... Download high resolution version (676x990, 124 KB)Frankfurt scenery from zh wiki File links The following pages link to this file: Frankfurt ... Frankfurt International Airport (German: Rhein-Main-Flughafen or Flughafen Frankfurt am Main) is located in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ... Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (German Flughafen Frankfurt-Hahn, IATA airport code: HHN, ICAO airport code: EDFH) is an international aviation facility between the towns of Simmern and Kirchberg in the Rhein-Hunsrück district, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... The Frankfurt School is a school of neo-Marxist social theory, social research, and philosophy. ... The Main Train Station at night Frankfurt has a rather good transit system. ...


Culture

Festivals

Frankfurt hosts several festivals, fairs and carnivals throughout the year. The most famous is the Rheingau-Music-Festival with many (mostly classical) concerts at castles and under the open sky surrounded by vineyards. It takes place during may.


Art

Frankfurt has a large variety of museums. The famoust are the Städel, the Schirn and the Museum of Modern Art. Yet Frankfurt provides a lot more Museums to all kinds of art.


External links

Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
Frankfurt, Germany
Skyline of Frankfurt, photographed from the south-west
Skyline of Frankfurt, photographed from the south-west

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frankfurt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2266 words)
From 855 to 1792 Frankfurt was the electoral city for the Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation.
Frankfurt managed to remain neutral during the Thirty Years' War, but it suffered from the plague that was brought to the city by refugees.
To the West, Frankfurt borders the Main-Taunus district (Cities and Municipalities Hattersheim am Main, Kriftel, Hofheim am Taunus, Kelkheim (Taunus), Liederbach am Taunus, Sulzbach (Taunus), Schwalbach am Taunus and Eschborn); to the Northwest the Hochtaunuskreis (Cities Steinbach (Taunus), Oberursel (Taunus) and Bad Homburg v.d.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m