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Encyclopedia > Frank Halford

Major Frank Bernard Halford, (18941955), was an aircraft engine designer. 1894 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term aircraft engine, for the purposes of this article, refers to aircraft reciprocating, or rotary, internal combustion engines as opposed to jet engines or turboprops. ...


In 1913 he left Nottingham University before graduating to learn to fly at Brooklands and Bristol Flying School and became a flight instructor using Bristol Boxkites. 1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... © University of Nottingham   The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Brooklands was a motor racing circuit built near Weybridge in Surrey, England. ...


He served in the First World War, in the Aeronautical Inspection Department of the Air Ministry as an engine examiner and the Royal Flying Corps where he fought at the front. Recalled to engineering duties he improved and enlarged the water-cooled six-cylinder Austro-Daimler, producing the 230hp Beardmore Halford Pullinger (BHP). This engine was further developed by Armstrong-Siddeley as the Puma. Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Air Ministry was formerly a department of the United Kingdom Government, established in 1918 with the responsibility of managing the affairs of the (then newly formed) Royal Air Force. ... The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was the over-land air arm of the British military during most of World War I. Origin and Early History Formed by Royal Warrant on May 13, 1912, the RFC superseded the Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers. ... The Austro-Daimler was an Austrian automobile manufactured from 1899 until German Daimler factory. ... The Armstrong-Siddeley automobiles (and later aircraft engines) were an English marque manufactured from 1919 (after the company was formed in 1917 by a merger between two Coventry_based companies, Armstrong-Whitworth and Siddeley-Deasy) to 1960. ... The Armstrong-Siddeley Puma was an aero engine developed towards the end of the first world war. ...


In 1923 he set up his own consultancy in London, alongside the equally famous Harry Ricardo. Here he designed the famous deHavilland Gypsy air-cooled inline engines, copying the success of the Cirrus Engine company in the general aviation role. 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... St. ... Sir Harry Ricardo (1885-1974) was one of the foremost engine designers and researchers in the early years of the development of the internal combustion engine. ...


During the 1930s Halford and Ricardo became interested in the sleeve valve as a method of increasing the allowable operating RPM of piston engines, thereby increasing the power from an otherwise smaller engine. While Ricardo worked with Bristol Engines, Halford worked with Napier on their Sabre design which would go on to be one of the most powerful piston aero engines, producing a whopping 3,500 hp from only 2200 cubic inches in late-war versions. Sleeve valves are a way of building valves for piston engines that have a number of advantages over the more common poppet valve, used in most engines, as well as disadvantages that have precluded their widespread adoption. ... The Bristol Aeroplane Company (formerly British and Colonial Aeroplane Company) began building primitive Bristol Boxkites in a former tram shed and became famous for the production of the war-time Blenhein and Beaufighter, the Brabazon airliner prototypes, the Britannia and Freighter and the Belvedere and Sycamore helicopters. ... The word Napier has several possible meanings in the English language. ... The Sabre was a 24-cylinder sleeve valve piston aircraft engine built by Napier & Son during WWII. It was one of the most powerful piston aircraft engines in the world, especially for inline designs, developing over 3,500 horsepower (2,200 kW) in its later versions. ...


During the war he became interested in jet engines, and designed a simplified version of Frank Whittle's centrifugal-flow designs with the air intake on the front and "straight-through" combustion chambers. Known initially as the Halford H.1, the project was taken up by De Havilland who produced it as the De Havilland Goblin. Halford's company was eventually purchased outright by De Havilland in 1944. Halford continued working on jets, turboprop and rocket engines. A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of NASA Glenn Research Center, USA, in 1946 Sir Frank Whittle (June 1, 1907 - August 9, 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the jet engine. ... de Havilland UK In 1920 Geoffrey de Havilland changed the name of his company Airco, where he had previously been chief designer, to the De Havilland Aircraft Company. ... The De Havilland Goblin was a turbojet engine. ... 1944 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... A diagram showing how a turboprop works. ... A Redstone rocket, part of the Mercury program A rocket is a vehicle, missile or aircraft which obtains thrust by the reaction to the ejection of fast moving exhaust gas from within a rocket engine. ...


piston engines

The Armstrong-Siddeley Puma was an aero engine developed towards the end of the first world war. ... The Sabre was a 24-cylinder sleeve valve piston aircraft engine built by Napier & Son during WWII. It was one of the most powerful piston aircraft engines in the world, especially for inline designs, developing over 3,500 horsepower (2,200 kW) in its later versions. ...

jet engines

The De Havilland Goblin was a turbojet engine. ... The De Havilland Ghost was a turbojet engine. ...

References

  • Douglas R. Taylor: Boxkite to jet: the remarkable career of Frank B Halford. Derby: Rolls Royce Heritage Trust, 1999 ISBN 1-872922-16-3 (Rolls Royce Heritage Trust. Historical series; no. 28)
  • A Century of Innovation Rolls Royce

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frank Halford at AllExperts (394 words)
During the 1930s Halford and Ricardo became interested in the sleeve valve as a method of increasing the allowable operating RPM of piston engines, thereby increasing the power from an otherwise smaller engine.
While Ricardo worked with Bristol Engines, Halford worked with Napier on their Sabre design which would go on to be one of the most powerful piston aero engines, producing a whopping 3,500 hp (2.6 MW) from only 2200 cubic inches (36 L) in late-war versions.
Known initially as the Halford H.1, the project was taken up by de Havilland who produced it as the de Havilland Goblin.
De Havilland Goblin at AllExperts (537 words)
The Goblin, originally the Halford H-1, was an early turbojet engine designed by Frank Halford and built by de Havilland.
It was based on the basic design pioneered by Frank Whittle, using a centrifugal compressor providing compressed air to sixteen individual flame cans, from which the exhaust powered a single-stage axial turbine.
Halford's changes made his engine somewhat simpler than Whittle's designs, notably allowing one of the main bearings to be removed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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