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Frank Aiken
Frank Aiken, politician and revolutionary
Born February 13, 1898
Camlough, Ireland
Died May 18, 1983
Dublin, Ireland

Frank Aiken (February 13, 1898 - May 18, 1983) was a senior Irish politician. He was a founding-member of Fianna Fáil and was first elected to Dáil Éireann in 1923 and at each subsequent election until 1973. Aiken served as Minister for Defence (1932-1939), Minister for Co-Ordination of Defensive Measures (1943-1945), Minister for Finance (1945-1948) and Minister for External Affairs (1951-1954 & 1957-1969). He also served as Minister for Finance and Minister for Lands & Fisheries. Aiken served as Tánaiste of Ireland from 1965 until 1969. Image File history File links Image of Frank Aiken - Anti-Treaty IRA Chief of Staff and later Irish Tánaiste. ... Jump to: navigation, search February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... County Armagh (Contae Ard Mhacha in Irish) is a county in Ulster, Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath), is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... Jump to: navigation, search February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... The Tánaiste (plural: Tánaistithe), or more formally An Tánaiste, is the deputy prime minister of the Republic of Ireland1. ...

Contents


Irish Republican Army involvement

The Anglo-Irish Treaty, (1921), which Aiken opposed.
Enlarge
The Anglo-Irish Treaty, (1921), which Aiken opposed.
Aiken was born in County Armagh (highlighted red)
Aiken was born in County Armagh (highlighted red)

Frank Aiken was born on February 13, 1898 at Camlough in County Armagh. He was educated at Newry Christian Brothers School and in 1914 he joined the Irish Volunteers. Within a few years he became Chairman of the Armagh Comhairle Ceanntair of Sinn Féin and elected onto Armagh County Council. During the War of Independence he commanded the Fourth Northern Division of the Irish Republican Army (IRA). He was accused by some Unionists and Unionist supporters of engineering an ethnic cleansing of Protestants from parts of South Armagh, Newry, and other fiercely anti-British areas, in particular the killing of seven Protestants (mostly civilians) in one day in Altnaveigh. The split over the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 left Aiken ultimately aligned with the Anti-Treaty side in spite of personal efforts to prevent division and civil war. He succeeded Liam Lynch as IRA Chief of Staff in March 1923 and issued the cease fire and dump arms orders on May 24, 1923 that effectively ended the Irish Civil War. He remained Chief of Staff of the IRA until 12 November 1925. Download high resolution version (433x684, 11 KB)Signature page from the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 From the National Archives of Ireland at [1] File links The following pages link to this file: Anglo-Irish Treaty Categories: UK Government images ... Download high resolution version (433x684, 11 KB)Signature page from the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 From the National Archives of Ireland at [1] File links The following pages link to this file: Anglo-Irish Treaty Categories: UK Government images ... Image File history File links map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jump to: navigation, search February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1898 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... County Armagh (Contae Ard Mhacha in Irish) is a county in Ulster, Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search Newry (Irish: Iúr Chinn Trá) is the sixth largest city in Northern Ireland, and thirteenth in all-Ireland. ... There are at least two religious orders that go by the informal name Christian Brothers. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Irish Volunteers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Jump to: navigation, search The name Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish), which means ourselves or we ourselves (not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone or we alone) has been applied to a series of political movements since 1905 in Ireland, each of which claim or claimed sole... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Fourth Northern Division operated in an area covering parts of counties Louth, Armagh, Monaghan, and Down. ... Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty Anglo-Irish Treaty refers to a agreement between the British government and representatives of the (extra-judicial) Irish Republic which concluded the Anglo-Irish War. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1921 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Liam Lynch is the name of more than one person of note. ... The following is the list of those who have served as Chief of Staff of the Irish Republican Army in the various incarnations of organisations bearing that name. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Irish Civil War (June 1922–April 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Founder of Fianna Fáil & government minister

Aiken was first elected to Dáil Éireann as a Sinn Féin candidate for Louth in 1923, continuing to be re-elected for Fianna Fáil at every election until his retirement from politics fifty years later. He entered the first Fianna Fáil government as Minister for Defence, later becoming Minister for the Co-ordination of Defensive Measures with responsibility for overseeing Ireland’s national defence and neutral position during the Second World War (see The Emergency). The Dáil Chamber Dáil Éireann is the lower house of the Oireachtas (parliament) of the Republic of Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search The name Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish), which means ourselves or we ourselves (not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone or we alone) has been applied to a series of political movements since 1905 in Ireland, each of which claim or claimed sole... The Louth parliamentary constituency spans the entire area of the smallest county in Ireland, taking in Drogheda, Dundalk and Ardee. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... For information about the 1975-1977 Emergency in India under Indira Gandhi, please see Indian Emergency. ...


Clash with the Governor-General

Aiken became a source of controversy in mid 1932 when he, along with Vice President of the Executive Council Sean T. O'Kelly publically snubbed the Governor-General of the Irish Free State James McNeill, by staging a public walkout at a function in the French legation in Dublin. McNeill privately wrote to Eamon de Valera, the President of the Executive Council, to complain at what media reports called the "boorishness" of Aiken and O'Kelly's behaviour. While agreeing that the situation was "regrettable" de Valera, instead of chastising the ministers, suggested that the Governor-General inform the Executive Council of his social engagements to enable ministers to avoid attending ones he was at. McNeill took offence at de Valera's response and against government advice, published his correspondence with de Valera. De Valera then formally advised King George V to dismiss the Governor-General. The King arranged a special deal between both men, whereby McNeill would retire from his post a few weeks earlier than planned, with the resignation coinciding with the dates de Valera had suggested for the dismissal. Jump to: navigation, search 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... The Vice-President of the Executive Council (Irish: Leas-Uachtarán na hArd-Chomhairle) was in effect the deputy prime minister of the Irish Free State, the Executive Council. ... Sean Thomas OKelly (Irish name: Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh, pronounced ) (August 25, 1882 - November 23, 1966) was the second President of Ireland (1945-1959). ... The Governor-General (Irish: Seanascal) was the representative of the King in the 1922-1937 Irish Free State. ... James McNeill (March 27, 1869 - December 12, 1938) was an Irish politician, who served as second Governor-General of the Irish Free State. ... Jump to: navigation, search Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath), is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... Jump to: navigation, search Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, sometimes Gaelicised Éamonn de Bhailéara; October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from the United Kingdom in the early 20th Century, and the... A President of the Executive Council is the presiding officer of an Executive Council, in Commonwealth constitutional practice. ... Jump to: navigation, search George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert Windsor, (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the House of Windsor in 1917. ...


Though the governor-generalship of the Irish Free State was controversial, the media and even anti-governor-generalship politicians in the opposition Labour Party publicly, and even members of de Valera's cabinet privately, criticised Aiken and O'Kelly for their treatment of McNeill, who all sides saw as a decent and honourable man. Aiken refused to discuss the affair later in life. De Valera later made amends by appointing Mrs McNeill as an Irish ambassador. Logo of the Irish Labour Party The Irish Labour Party (Irish: Páirti an Lucht Oibre) is the third largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own. ...


Widely praised Minister for External Affairs

UN Headquarters in New YorkAiken helped shape an independent foreign policy for Ireland on the world stage.
Enlarge
UN Headquarters in New York
Aiken helped shape an independent foreign policy for Ireland on the world stage.

Aiken was Minister for Finance for three years following the war and was involved in economic post–war development, in the industrial, agricultural, educational and other spheres. However, it was his two periods as Minister for External Affairs that Aiken fulfilled his enormous political potential. As Foreign Minister he adopted where possible an independent stance for Ireland at the United Nations and other international forums such as the Council of Europe. Despite a great deal of opposition, both at home and abroad, he stubbornly asserted the right of smaller UN member countries to discuss the representation of communist China at the General Assembly. Unable to bring the issue of the partition of Ireland to the UN (because of Britain's veto on the Security Council), Aiken ensured that Ireland vigorously defended the rights of small nations such as Tibet and Hungary, nations whose problems he felt Ireland could identify with and had a moral obligation to help. Aiken also supported the right of countries such as Algeria to self-determination and spoke out against apartheid in South Africa. Under Ireland’s policy of promoting the primacy of international law and reducing global tension at the height of the Cold War, Aiken promoted the idea of areas of law, which he believed would free the most tense regions around the world from the threat of nuclear war. He also introduced the so-called 'Aiken Plan' to the United Nations in an effort to combine disarmament and peace in the Middle East. He received the honour of being the first minister to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1968 in Moscow. Photo of UN Building at New York City (taken June 14, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo of UN Building at New York City (taken June 14, 2003 by djmutex), herewith licensed under GFDL. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The Palace of Europe in Strasbourg The Council of Europe is an international organisation of 46 member states in the European region. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search Tibet (Tibetan: བོད་, Bod, pronounced pö in Lhasa dialect; Chinese: 西藏, pinyin: XÄ«zàng; older spelling Thibet) is a region in Central Asia and the home of the Tibetan people. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... Jump to: navigation, search For the generic term for a high-tension rivalry between countries, see cold war (war). ... Arms control is a broad term alluding to a range of political concepts and aims. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Opened for signature July 1, 1968 at New York Entered into force March 5, 1970 Conditions for entry into force Ratification by the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, and 40 other signatory states. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA:   listen?) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ...


Aiken's impact as Minister for External Affairs was such that he is sometimes seen as the father of Irish foreign policy. His performance was praised in particular by a later Minister for Foreign Affairs, Fine Gael's Garret FitzGerald, himself a later acclaimed holder of the office. Fine Gael (IPA in English and in Irish, approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in both the Republic of Ireland and Ireland as a whole. ... Dr. Garret FitzGerald (Irish name: Gearóid MacGearailt) (born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ...


Quit politics over Charles Haughey

Aiken retired from Ministerial office and as Tánaiste in 1969. During the Arms Crisis it is said that the Taoiseach, Jack Lynch, turned to Aiken for advice on a number of issues. He retired from politics in 1973 due to the fact that Charles Haughey, whose style of politics Aiken strongly disliked, was allowed run as a Fianna Fáil candidate in the 1973 general election. Initially he planned to announce the reason for his decision but under pressure finally agreed to announce that he was retiring on medical advice.[1] The Tánaiste (plural: Tánaistithe), or more formally An Tánaiste, is the deputy prime minister of the Republic of Ireland1. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... The Arms Crisis was a political scandal in the Republic of Ireland, in which two government ministers from the Fianna Fáil political party were accused of illegally importing £100,000 worth of weapons for the Provisional Irish Republican Army. ... The Taoiseach (plural: Taoisigh) or, more formally, An Taoiseach, is the head of government of the Republic of Ireland and the leader of the Irish cabinet1. ... John (Jack) Mary Lynch (Irish name Seán Ó Loingsigh) (August 15, 1917-October 20, 1999), was the fourth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; 1966 to 1973 and 1977 to 1979. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... Charles James Haughey (Irish name Cathal Ó hEochaidh) (born September 16, 1925), was the sixth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving three terms in office; 1979 to 1981, March 1982 to December 1982 and 1987 to 1992. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1973 was held on February 28, 1973. ...


Refused presidency of Ireland

The residence of the President of IrelandAiken refused pressure by President de Valera to succeed him in the post.
The residence of the President of Ireland
Aiken refused pressure by President de Valera to succeed him in the post.

After his retirement, outgoing President of Ireland, Eamon de Valera, sought to convince Aiken, one of his closest friends, to run for Fianna Fáil in the 1973 general election. However Aiken refused all requests to run and the party finally selected Erskine Hamilton Childers to be its candidate. Childers won the election. Áras an Uachtaráin - Irish presidential palace. ... Áras an Uachtaráin - Irish presidential palace. ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of Ireland (Irish: Uachtarán na hÉireann) is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search Eamon de Valera (born Edward George de Valera, sometimes Gaelicised Éamonn de Bhailéara; October 14, 1882 – August 29, 1975), was an Irish politician, best known as a leader of Irelands struggle for independence from the United Kingdom in the early 20th Century, and the... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (IPA ; English translation: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in Ireland. ... In the Irish presidential election in 1973 with President de Valera constitutionally barred from seeking a third term, Fianna Fáil sought to get former Tánaiste Frank Aiken to run for the presidency. ... Erskine Hamilton Childers (November 11, 1905 - November 17, 1974), the son of Robert Erskine Childers (the author of The Riddle of the Sands), served as the fourth President of Ireland from 1973 until his death in 1974. ...


Clash with Ernest Blythe

Shortly before his death, former Cumann na nGaedhael minister Ernest Blythe accused Aiken of publicly rudely snubbing him through his political career. He said that, because of his support for the Treaty and Aiken's opposition, Aiken would pointedly turn his back on him whether they came into contact. Colleagues of Aiken confirmed the story and spoke of their embarrassment about it. They contrasted his continuing bitterness towards Blythe with the cross party friendships of their colleagues Sean MacEntee (anti-treaty) and Desmond FitzGerald (pro-treaty) who after the divide re-established relationships and ensured their children held no civil war bitterness. Great rivals Eamon de Valera and W.T. Cosgrave, after years of emnity, also became reconciled in the 1960s. However Aiken refused to reconcile with former friends who had taken sides in the Civil War. Cumann na nGaedheal (League of the Gaels) was an Irish language name given to two Irish political parties. ... Ernest Blythe (Ir: Earnán de Blaghd) (April 13, 1889–February 23, 1975), Irish politician. ... Seán MacEntee (1889–1984) was a Fianna Fáil politician. ... Desmond FitzGerald (1888-1947), Irish revolutionary, poet and Cumann na nGaedhael politician. ... William Thomas Cosgrave, (June 6, 1880 - November 16, 1965) served as the first President of the Executive Council of the Irish Free State from 1922 to 1932. ... Jump to: navigation, search The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ...


Honours, Death

Aiken received many decorations and honours, including honorary doctorates from the National University of Ireland and University College Dublin. He was also a lifelong supporter of the Irish language. His son ran unsuccessfully in the 1987 and 1989 general elections for the Progressive Democrats. His wife died in a road accident in 1978. The National University of Ireland (NUI) is a federal university system of constituent universities, previously called constituent colleges, and recognised colleges set up under the Irish Universities Act, 1908, and significantly amended by the Universities Act, 1997. ... University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin - more commonly University College Dublin (UCD) - is Irelands largest university, with over 20,000 students. ... Jump to: navigation, search Irish (Gaeilge), a Goidelic language spoken in the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Irish general election of 1987 was held on February 17, 1987, four weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on January 20. ... The Irish general election of 1989 was held on Friday, June 15, 1989, three weeks after the dissolution of the Dáil on May 25. ... The Progressive Democrats (in Irish An Páirtí Daonlathach, literal back-translation: The Democratic Party) is a free market liberal party in the Republic of Ireland founded in 1985. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1978 was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1978 calendar). ...


Frank Aiken died on May 18, 1983 in Dublin from natural causes at the age of 85. He was buried with full State honours in his native Camlough in County Armagh, Northern Ireland, UK. Jump to: navigation, search May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Dublin (Irish: Baile Átha Cliath), is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Ireland, located near the midpoint of Irelands east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin region. ... County Armagh (Contae Ard Mhacha in Irish) is a county in Ulster, Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267...


Political Career

Preceded by:
Desmond FitzGerald
Minister for Defence
1932-1939
Succeeded by:
Oscar Traynor
Preceded by:
Joseph Connolly
Minister for Lands
1936
Succeeded by:
Gerald Boland
Preceded by:
Newly Created Office
Minister for the Co-Ordination of Defensive Measures
1939-1945
Succeeded by:
Office Ceases to Exist
Preceded by:
Seán T. Ó Ceallaigh
Minister for Finance
1945-1948
Succeeded by:
Patrick McGilligan
Preceded by:
Seán MacBride
Minister for External Affairs
1951-1954
Succeeded by:
Liam Cosgrave
Preceded by:
James Dillon
Minister for Agriculture
1957
Succeeded by:
Seán Moylon
Preceded by:
Liam Cosgrave
Minister for External Affairs
1957-1969
Succeeded by:
Patrick Hillery
Preceded by:
Seán Moylon
Minister for Agriculture
1957
Succeeded by:
Patrick Smith
Preceded by:
Seán MacEntee
Tánaiste
1965-1969
Succeeded by:
Erskine Hamilton Childers


Desmond FitzGerald (1888-1947), Irish revolutionary, poet and Cumann na nGaedhael politician. ... The Minister for Defence is in charge of the Department of Defence in the Republic of Ireland. ... Oscar Traynor (March 21, 1886-December 15, 1963), Fianna Fáil politician and revolutionary. ... Joseph Connolly (1886-1961) was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... The Minister for Communications, Marine & Natural Resources is the chief minister at the Department of the same name in the Irish Government. ... Gerald Boland (May 25, 1885 - January 5, 1973) was a senior Irish politician. ... The Minister for Supplies was created by the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act, 1939, to assist Ireland through the World War II, or The Emergency, as referred to by the Irish Government. ... Sean Thomas OKelly (Irish name: Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh, pronounced ) (August 25, 1882 - November 23, 1966) was the second President of Ireland (1945-1959). ... The Minister for Finance is the senior minister at the Department of Finance (An Roinn Airgeadais) in the Irish Government. ... Patrick McGilligan (1889-1979), Irish politician and lawyer. ... Seán MacBride Seán MacBride (January 26, 1904 – January 15, 1988) was a senior Irish politician, barrister, revolutionary & statesman. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born April 13, 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977. ... James Dillon (26 September 1902 - 10 February 1986) was an Irish politician and leader of Fine Gael from 1959 to 1965. ... The Minister for Agriculture and Food is an important position in the Irish Government. ... Seán Moylon (November 19, 1888 - November 16, 1957), was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... Liam Cosgrave (Irish name Liam Mac Cosgair) (born April 13, 1920), served as the fifth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland between 1973 and 1977. ... The Minister for Foreign Affairs is the senior minister at the Department of Foreign Affairs (An Roinn Gnóthaí Eachtracha) in the Irish Government. ... Dr. Patrick John Hillery (born May 2, 1923) was an Irish Fianna Fáil politician and the sixth President of Ireland from 1976 until 1990. ... Seán Moylon (November 19, 1888 - November 16, 1957), was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... The Minister for Agriculture and Food is an important position in the Irish Government. ... Paddy Smith was a senior Irish politician. ... Jump to: navigation, search Seán MacEntee (1889–1984) was a senior Irish politician. ... The Tánaiste (plural: Tánaistithe), or more formally An Tánaiste, is the deputy prime minister of the Republic of Ireland1. ... Erskine Hamilton Childers (November 11, 1905 - November 17, 1974), the son of Robert Erskine Childers (the author of The Riddle of the Sands), served as the fourth President of Ireland from 1973 until his death in 1974. ...

Tánaistithe na hÉireann
(Deputy Prime Minister of Ireland)
Government of Ireland

Seán T. Ó Ceallaigh | Seán F. Lemass | William Norton | Seán MacEntee | Frank Aiken | Erskine H. Childers | Brendan Corish | George Colley | Michael O'Leary | Ray MacSharry | Dick Spring | Peter Barry | Brian Lenihan | John P. Wilson | Bertie Ahern | Mary Harney The Tánaiste (plural: Tánaistithe), or more formally An Tánaiste, is the deputy prime minister of the Republic of Ireland1. ... The Coat of Arms of the Republic of Ireland This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Sean Thomas OKelly (Irish name: Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh, pronounced ) (August 25, 1882 - November 23, 1966) was the second President of Ireland (1945-1959). ... ... William Norton (1900-1963), Irish politician, Labour Party leader (1932-1960). ... Jump to: navigation, search Seán MacEntee (1889–1984) was a senior Irish politician. ... Erskine Hamilton Childers (November 11, 1905 - November 17, 1974), the son of Robert Erskine Childers (the author of The Riddle of the Sands), served as the fourth President of Ireland from 1973 until his death in 1974. ... Brendan Corish ( 1918- 1990), Irish Labour leader ( 1960- 1977). ... George Colley (October 18, 1925 - September 17, 1983), was a senior Irish politician. ... Michael OLeary (born 1936), is a former leader of the Irish Labour Party ( 1981- 1982). ... Ray MacSharry (born April 29, 1938), is an Irish Fianna Fáil politician and Tánaiste (1982). ... Richard Spring (born August 29, 1950 in Tralee County Kerry), is a businessman and former senior Irish politician. ... Peter Barry (born August 10, 1928) is a retired Irish Fine Gael politician and businessman. ... Brian Lenihan (November 17, 1930 - November 1, 1995) was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... John P. Wilson (born 1923) was a senior Irish Fianna Fáil politician. ... Jump to: navigation, search Patrick Bartholemew Ahern (Irish name: Pádraig Parthalán Ó hEachthairn) (born September 12, 1951), commonly called Bertie Ahern, is an Irish politician. ... Mary Harney (born March 11, 1953) is an Irish Progressive Democrats politician. ...


Vice-Presidents of the Executive Council
Kevin O'Higgins | Ernest Blythe | Seán T. Ó Ceallaigh
The Vice-President of the Executive Council (Irish: Leas-Uachtarán na hArd-Chomhairle) was in effect the deputy prime minister of the Irish Free State, the Executive Council. ... Kevin Christopher OHiggins ( 7 June 1892- 10 July 1927), Irish politician. ... Ernest Blythe (Ir: Earnán de Blaghd) (April 13, 1889–February 23, 1975), Irish politician. ... Sean Thomas OKelly (Irish name: Seán Tomás Ó Ceallaigh, pronounced ) (August 25, 1882 - November 23, 1966) was the second President of Ireland (1945-1959). ...

Footnotes

  1. ^  Bruce Arnold, Jack Lynch: Hero in Crisis (Merlin Publishing, 2001) p.173-175.

External links

  • Frank Aiken Papers, in the Archives Department, University College Dublin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Frank Aiken (84 words)
Frank Aiken was the Irish Minister of Foreign Affairs between 1952 and 1969 (with exception of 1954-1957 when his party Fianna Fáil went into opposition) and who was a revolutionary hero of the twenties and Founding Father of Fianna Fáil.
Aiken had his moments of fame in the United Nations General Assembly.
He introduced the so-called 'Aiken Plan' to combine disarmament and peace in the Middle East.
Frank Aiken - Politics.ie Wiki (2294 words)
Frank Aiken (1898 - 1983) was born on February 13, 1898 at Carrickbracken, Camlough, County Armagh, the youngest of 5 children.
Aiken also was responsible for press censorship during The Emergency, the controller of which for a time was his former Ministerial colleague Joseph Connolly.
His son Frank Aiken Jnr contested the 1987 and the 1989 General Elections unsuccessfully for the Progressive Democrats in the Louth constituency.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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