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Encyclopedia > Francis de Sales
Saint Francis de Sales

Saint Francis de Sales
The Gentleman Saint
Born 1567, Chateau of Thorens, Savoy
Died 28 December 1622, Lyon
Venerated in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism
Beatified 8 January 1662 by Pope Alexander VII
Canonized 19 April 1665 by Pope Alexander VII
Major shrine Annecy
Feast January 24
Attributes Heart of Jesus, Crown of Thorns
Patronage Baker, Oregon; Cincinnati, Ohio; Catholic press; Columbus, Ohio; confessors; deaf people; educators; Upington, South Africa; Wilmington, Delaware; writers; journalists
Saints Portal

Saint Francis de Sales (in French, St François de Sales) (21 August 1567 - 28 December 1622) was bishop of Geneva and Roman Catholic saint. He worked to convert Protestants back to Catholicism, was an accomplished preacher, and wrote books on religious topics. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... This article is about the French city. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... Alexander VII, né Fabio Chigi (February 13, 1599 - May 22, 1667) was pope from April 7, 1655 until his death in 1667. ... Icon of St. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Baker City is a city and the county seat of Baker County, Oregon. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State Counties Franklin, Delaware, and Fairfield Government  - Mayor Michael B. Coleman (D) Area  - City  212. ... Upington is a town founded in 1871 located in the Northern Cape, South Africa, along the Orange River. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ... Though anyone who creates a written work may be called a writer, the term is usually reserved for those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Duke of Alva arrives in the Netherlands with Spanish forces to suppress unrest there. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ...

Contents

Childhood and youth

Francis de Sales was born at Thorens into a Savoyard noble family. His father was Francois de Boisy and his mother was Francoise de Sionnz. He was the first of twelve children, and as such enjoyed an education in La Roche and Annecy; His father only wanting him to attend the best schools. In 1578 at the age of 12 he went to the Collège de Clermont in Paris. A year later Francis was engulfed in a personal crisis when after attending a theological discussion about predestination became convinced that he was damned to Hell. In December 1586 his despair was so great that he was physically ill and even bed ridden for a time. In January 1587 he visited the Church Saint-Etienne des Gres with great difficulty. There his crisis ended, and he decided to dedicate his life to God. Francis came to the conclusion that whatever God had in store for him was good, because God is love. This faithful devotion to the God of love not only expelled his doubts, but also influenced the rest of his life and his teachings. Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... The Lycée Louis-le-Grand, in Paris is one of the most famous lycées providing preparatory classes for grandes écoles. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Predestination (also linked with foreknowledge) is a religious concept, which involves the relationship between the beginning of things and their destinies. ... For other uses, see Hell (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


In 1588 Francis transferred from Paris to the University of Padua where he studied both law and Theology. At the University he made up his mind about becoming a priest. In 1592 he ended his studies with the promotion to doctor certified in both law and theology. Then he made the pilgrimage to Loreto before going home. At home his father had already secured a variety of positions for his son, one of which was a position on the Senate of Chambéry. It was difficult for Francis' father to accept that his son had already chosen another career. Gymnasivm Patavinum: The Universitys main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... This article is about religious workers. ... Loreto is the Italian word for laurel-wood. ... Chambéry is the capital of the department of Savoie, France. ...


After studying the humanities, rhetoric, theology, and law at La Roche, Annecy, Paris, and Padua, he famously refused to marry the wealthy heiress his father had chosen as his bride, preferring a clerical career. The intervention of Claude de Granier, then bishop of Geneva, won him ordination and appointment as provost of the cathedral chapter of Geneva in 1593. Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... La Roche is the name or part of the name of several places: Communes of Belgium: a small town in the Belgian Ardenne La Roche-en-Ardenne Communes of France: La Roche-Maurice; La Roche-Guyon, in the Val-dOise département Communes of Switzeland: Canton of Fribourg Roche... City flag Coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Region Rhône-Alpes Department Haute-Savoie (préfecture) Arrondissement Annecy Canton Chief town of 3 cantons Intercommunality Communauté de lagglomération dAnnecy Mayor Jean-Luc Rigaut  (UDF) (since January 15, 2007) Statistics... This article is about the capital of France. ... Padua, Italy, (Italian: IPA: , Latin: Patavium, Venetian: ) is a city in the Veneto, northern Italy, the economic and communications hub of the region. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Catholic deacon... A provost is a senior official in a number of Christian churches. ...


The Old Faith

Since the Reformation, the seat of the bishops of Geneva had been located at Annecy in Savoy, due to Calvinist control of Geneva itself. Francis, in his capacity as provost, engaged in enthusiastic campaigns of evangelism among the Protestants of Savoy, winning many returns to the Old Faith. He also traveled to Rome and Paris, where he forged alliances with Pope Clement VIII and the French King Henry IV. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1053x1274, 490 KB) (Uploaded using CommonsHelper or PushForCommons) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis de Sales Saint Francis de Sales church St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1053x1274, 490 KB) (Uploaded using CommonsHelper or PushForCommons) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis de Sales Saint Francis de Sales church St. ... Saint Francis of Sales (in French, St François de Sales) (1567-1622), seventeenth-century bishop of Geneva and Roman Catholic saint, was born at Thorens into a Savoyard noble family on 21 August 1567. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... City flag Coat of arms Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Region Rhône-Alpes Department Haute-Savoie (préfecture) Arrondissement Annecy Canton Chief town of 3 cantons Intercommunality Communauté de lagglomération dAnnecy Mayor Jean-Luc Rigaut  (UDF) (since January 15, 2007) Statistics... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... This article is about the capital of France. ... Pope Clement VIII (Fano, Italy, February 24, 1536 – March 3, 1605 in Rome), born Ippolito Aldobrandini, was Pope from January 30, 1592 to March 3, 1605. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ...


In 1602, Bishop Granier died, and Francis was consecrated bishop of Geneva himself. During his years as bishop, he garnished a reputation as a spellbinding preacher and something of an ascetic; in particular, he was known as a friend of the poor, a man of almost supernatural affability and understanding. These last qualities come through wonderfully in his famous books. He died on 28 December 1622 in Lyon, while he travelled in the entourage of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy. The word ascetic derives from the ancient Greek term askesis (practice, training or exercise). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... This article is about the French city. ... Charles Emmanuel I (b. ... This article is about the nobility title. ...


Francis de Sales was beatified in 1661 by Pope Alexander VII, who then canonized him in 1665. His feast day is January 24. In 1877, Pope Pius IX declared him a doctor of the Universal Church. In Catholicism, beatification (from Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... Alexander VII, né Fabio Chigi (February 13, 1599 – May 22, 1667) was Pope from April 7, 1655 until his death in 1667. ... This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... In Roman Catholicism, a Doctor of the Church (Latin doctor, teacher, from Latin docere, to teach) is a saint from whose writings the whole Christian Church is held to have derived great advantage and to whom eminent learning and great sanctity have been attributed by a proclamation of a pope...


In 1923 Pope Pius XI proclaimed him a patron of writers and journalists, because of the books he wrote, the most famous of which was Introduction à la vie dévote ("Introduction to the Devout Life"). He also left the mystical Traité de l' Amour de Dieu ("Treatise on the Love of God") and many highly valued epistles of spiritual direction. He was a notably clear and gracious stylist in French, Italian and Latin. Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... Introduction to the Devout Life (Introduction à la vie dévote) was written by St. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


St Francis de Sales is buried at the basilica of the Visitation, Annecy. Many miracles have been reported at his shrine. The relic of his heart was kept at Lyon, whence during the French Revolution it was moved to Venice, where it is venerated today. St. ... Visitation can mean several things: In the United States, visitation is the legal term for the right of a non-custodial parent to visit with their children: see contact. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... A relic is an object, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of someone of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial, Relics are an important aspect of Buddhism, some denominations of Christianity, Hinduism, shamanism, and many other personal belief systems. ... This article is about the French city. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... For other uses, see Venice (disambiguation). ...


Along with Saint Jane Frances de Chantal, Francis founded the women's Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary in Annecy on 6 June 1610. Jane Frances de Chantal (Jeanne-Françoise Frémiot, baronne de Chantal, January 28, 1572 - December 13, 1641) was born in Dijon, France. ... The Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary or the Visitation Order is a Roman Catholic religious order for women. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ...


The order of the Salesians of Don Bosco, founded by St John Bosco in 1859 (approved by the Holy See in 1874), is named after him. Likewise the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales (OSFS), founded by Louis Brisson and the Missionaries of St. Francis de Sales, founded by Peter Mermier in 1830. A religious order is an organization of people who live in some way set apart from society in accordance with religious devotion. ... St. ... Giovanni Merchior Bosco Giovanni Melchior Bosco, or John Bosco, (August 16, 1815 - January 31, 1888) was a priest and educator. ... The Oblate Fathers of St. ... The Missionaries of St. ...


The island St. François is named in honor of Francis de Sales.


DeSales University , located in Center Valley, PA (formerly Allentown College of St. Francis de Sales), is named for St. Francis de Sales and is a Catholic liberal arts college administered by the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales. DeSales University is a private catholic university for men and women, located in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... The Oblate Fathers of St. ...


François de Sales is recognized as exemplary in the Church of England, where his memoria is also on January 24, and in the Church in Wales, when his memorial is moved to January 23, due to a conflict with St Cadoc. The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of the Church in Wales The Church in Wales (Welsh: Yr Eglwys Yng Nghymru) is a member Church of the Anglican Communion, consisting of six dioceses in Wales. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cornish king of the same name see King Cadoc Saint Cadoc or Cadog, Abbot of Llancarfan, was one of the 6th century Welsh saints whose life touched King Arthur. ...


See also

Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ...

External links

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