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Encyclopedia > Francis Scott Key
Francis Scott Key

Born August 1, 1779(1779-08-01)
Carroll County, Maryland, United States
Died January 11, 1843
Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Nationality Flag of the United States American
Occupation Poet, lawyer, district attorney
Religious beliefs The Episcopal Church
Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key
Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key
Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left)

Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur poet, from Georgetown, who wrote the words to the United States' national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner". Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1206x1536, 248 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Carroll County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... -1... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 2272 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Maryland Historical Society, founded in 1844, is the oldest cultural institution in the state of Maryland. ... Picture of cannon at Ft. ... Picture of cannon at Ft. ... Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... The Francis Scott Key Bridge, also known as the Outer Harbor Bridge, is a continuous truss bridge spanning the Patapsco River in Maryland, USA. The bridge was opened in March 1977 and is named for the author of the Star Spangled Banner, Francis Scott Key. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ...

Contents

Life

Francis Scott Key was born to Ann Louis Penn Dagworthy (Charlton) and Captain John Ross Key at the family plantation Terra Rubra in what was Frederick County and is now Carroll County, Maryland. His father John Ross Key was a lawyer, a judge and an officer in the Continental Army. Captain John Ross Key (September 19, 1754 – October 11, 1821). ... Frederick County is located in the western part of the U.S. state of Maryland, bordering the southern border of Pennsylvania and the northeastern border of Virginia. ... Carroll County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Captain John Ross Key (September 19, 1754 – October 11, 1821). ... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ...


He studied law at St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland and also learned under his uncle Philip Barton Key.[1] St. ... Annapolis redirects here. ...


"The Star-Spangled Banner"

During the War of 1812, Key, accompanied by the American Prisoner Exchange Agent Colonel John Stuart Skinner, dined aboard the British ship HMS Tonnant, as the guests of three British officers: Vice Admiral Alexander Cochrane, Rear Admiral Sir George Cockburn, and Major General Robert Ross. Skinner and Key were there to negotiate the release of a prisoner, Dr. William Beanes. Beanes was a resident of Upper Marlboro, Maryland and had been captured by the British after he placed rowdy stragglers under citizen's arrest with a group of men. Skinner, Key, and Beanes were allowed to return to their own sloop, but were not allowed to return to Baltimore because they had become familiar with the strength and position of the British units and of the British intention to attack Baltimore. As a result of this, Key was unable to do anything but watch the bombarding of the American forces at Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore on the night of September 13September 14, 1814.[2] This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... HMS Tonnant was a 3rd rate ship of the line of 80 guns, built in 1792 as the French ship Tonnant (Thundering). She fought in the battles of Genoa (14 March 1795) and the Nile (1 August 1798), where she was captured by the British. ... Admiral Sir Alexander (Forrester Inglis) Cochrane (April 23, 1758 – January 26, 1832) was a senior Royal Navy commander during the Napoleonic Wars. ... Sir George Cockburn was born in 1772 and went to sea at the age of 14. ... Robert Ross (1766 - September 12, 1814) was a British army officer who participated in the Napoleonic War and the War of 1812. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... Combatants Great Britain United States of America Commanders Robert Ross† Alexander Cochrane Arthur Brooke Samuel Smith John Stricker George Armistead Strength 5,000 2,000 (Baltimore defenses) 1,000 (Fort McHenry garrison) Casualties 46 dead, 300 wounded 310 killed or wounded In the Battle of Baltimore, one of the turning... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


When the smoke cleared, Key was able to see an American flag still waving. On the way back to Baltimore, he was inspired to write a poem describing his experience, "The Defence of Fort McHenry", which he published in the Patriot on September 20, 1814. He intended to fit the rhythms of composer John Stafford Smith's "To Anacreon in Heaven".[2] It has become better known as "The Star Spangled Banner". Under this name, the song was adopted as the American national anthem, first by an Executive Order from President Woodrow Wilson in 1916 (which had little effect beyond requiring military bands to play it) and then by a Congressional resolution in 1931, signed by President Herbert Hoover. Union Jack. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... John Stafford Smith (1750 - 1836) is a composer best known for writing To Anacreon in Heaven. ... The Anacreontic Song was the official song of the Anacreontic Society, a club of amateur musicians in London who gathered regularly to perform concerts. ... Nicholson took the copy Key gave him to a printer, where it was published as a broadside on September 17 under the title The Defence of Fort McHenry, with an explanatory note explaining the circumstances of its writing. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ...


Later life

In 1832, Key served as the attorney for Sam Houston during his trial in the U.S. House of Representatives for assaulting another Congressman. [3] He published a prose work called The Power of Literature, and Its Connection with Religion in 1834.[1] For other persons named Sam Houston, see Sam Houston (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party...


In 1835, Key prosecuted Richard Lawrence for his unsuccessful attempt to assassinate President of the United States Andrew Jackson. Richard Lawrence (1800? - 1861) Lawrence was born in England in 1800 (or perhaps 1801). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


In 1843, Key died at the home of his daughter Elizabeth Howard in Baltimore from pleurisy and was initially interred in Old Saint Paul's Cemetery in the vault of John Eager Howard. In 1866, his body was moved to his family plot in Frederick at Mount Olivet Cemetery. Though Key had written poetry from time to time, often with heavily religious themes, these works were not collected and published until 14 years after his death.[1] Pleurisy, also known as pleuritis, is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the pleural cavity surrounding the lungs, which can cause painful respiration (also called pleuritic chest pain) and other symptoms. ... The first cemetery of Saint Pauls Church in Baltimore was located at intersection of Sollers Road & North Point Road in what is now Dundalk. ... John Eager Howard, portrait by Chester Harding. ... Location in Maryland Coordinates: , Country State County Frederick Founded 1745 Government  - Mayor William J. Holtzinger (R)  - Board of Alderman Marcia Hall (D) Alan E. Imhoff (R) David P. Koontz (D) Donna K. Ramsburg (D) C. Paul Smith (R) Area  - Total 20. ... Gate of Mount Olivet Cemetery with the Francis Scott Key Monument in the distance. ...


The Key Monument Association erected a memorial in 1898 and the remains of both Francis Scott Key and his wife were placed in a crypt in the base of the monument.


Other related items

In 1861, Key's grandson was imprisoned in Fort McHenry with the Mayor of Baltimore, George William Brown, and other locals deemed to be pro-South. Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... Here is a list of mayors that have served the city of Baltimore, Maryland. ... George William Brown was the mayor of Baltimore, Maryland from 1860 to 1861. ...


Key was a distant cousin and the namesake of F. Scott Fitzgerald whose full name was Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald. His direct descendants include geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan, guitarist Dana Key, and the American fashion designer and socialite Pauline de Rothschild. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American Jazz Age author of novels and short stories. ... Thomas Hunt Morgan (September 25, 1866 – December 4, 1945) was an American geneticist and embryologist. ... Dana Key was a guitarist and singer who was a co-founder of the Christian rock group DeGarmo & Key. ... Pauline de Rothschild (née Pauline Potter, Paris, France, December 31, 1908 - Santa Barbara, California, 1976) was a fashion icon and tastemaker who also was known as a writer, a fashion designer, and a translator of both Elizabethan poetry and the plays of Christopher Fry. ...


His sister, Anne Phoebe Charlton Key, married Roger B. Taney, future Chief Justice of the United States and author of the Court's Dred Scott decision. Roger Brooke Taney (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States, from 1836 until his death in 1864, and the first Roman Catholic to hold that office. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... Holding States do not have the right to claim an individual’s property that was fairly theirs in another state. ...


Robert Altman credited Key with the "title song" of Brewster McCloud, though it contained only John Stafford Smith's instrumentals. For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... Brewster McCloud is a 1970 movie directed by Robert Altman; it centers on a young recluse who lives in a fallout shelter of the Houston Astrodome building a pair of wings so hell be able to fly. ... John Stafford Smith (1750 - 1836) is a composer best known for writing To Anacreon in Heaven. ...


Monuments and memorials

Plaque commemorating the death of Francis Scott Key placed by the DAR in Baltimore.
Plaque commemorating the death of Francis Scott Key placed by the DAR in Baltimore.
The Howard family vault at Saint Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland.
The Howard family vault at Saint Paul's Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Francis Scott Key also has a school named after him in Brooklyn, New York. I.S 117 is a junior high school located in the Fort Greene section of Brooklyn on Willoughby Avenue. It houses 6th, 7th, and 8th grade classrooms as well as a District 75 Special Education unit. The Special Education classes include children who are emotionally disturbed. For more information on the school and its programs please visit the schools main site, P369k, located in Downtown Brooklyn.
  • A monument to Key was commissioned by San Francisco businessman James Lick, who donated some $60,000 for a sculpture of Key to be raised in Golden Gate Park.[5] The travertine monument was executed by sculptor William W. Story in Rome in 1885-87.[6][7] The current budget of the city of San Francisco allocates some $140,000 to renovate the Key monument, which the city notes is about to be lost to environmental degradation if repairs are not made. (Restoration of the monument recently began and is slated to be finished by September 2008, according to the city.)[citation needed]

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1003x669, 1541 KB) Summary File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis Scott Key User talk:Evrik/images ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1003x669, 1541 KB) Summary File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis Scott Key User talk:Evrik/images ... The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a lineage membership organization[1] dedicated to promoting historic preservation, education, and patriotism. ... The Washington Monument dominates the center of the neighborhood Mount Vernon is a neighborhood located just to the north of downtown Baltimore, Maryland. ... Image File history File links Howard_vault. ... Image File history File links Howard_vault. ... The Francis Scott Key Bridge, or, more commonly, the Key Bridge, is a reinforced concrete arch bridge conveying U.S. Highway 29 traffic across the Potomac River between the Rosslyn section of Arlington County, Virginia, and the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C. It was built by the U.S... The skyscrapers of Rosslyn as seen behind The Pentagon. ... Arlington County is an urban county of about 203,000 residents in the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the U.S., directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. [1] Originally part of the District of Columbia, the land now comprising the county was retroceded to Virginia in a July... The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The Whitehurst Freeway as seen from the Key Bridge. ... The Francis Scott Key Bridge, also known as the Outer Harbor Bridge, is a continuous truss bridge spanning the Patapsco River in Maryland, USA. The bridge was opened in March 1977 and is named for the author of the Star Spangled Banner, Francis Scott Key. ... Interstate 695 (abbreviated I-695) is a 51. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... St. ... An auditorium is the area within a theatre, concert hall or other performance space where the audience is located in order to hear and watch the performance. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... Gate of Mount Olivet Cemetery with the Francis Scott Key Monument in the distance. ... Thomas Johnson Thomas Johnson (1732-1819) was an American jurist with a distinguished political career. ... Barbara Fritchie Barbara Fritchie (nee Hauer), also known as Barbara Frietchie, and sometimes spelled Frietschie, (December 3, 1766 – December 18, 1862) was an American patriot during the Civil War. ... For other uses of Stonewall Jackson, see Stonewall Jackson (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Skyline of Downtown Brooklyn seen from the East River Metro Tech is a business center in Downtown Brooklyn Downtown Brooklyn is the third largest central business district in New York City (following Midtown Manhattan and Downtown Manhattan), and is located in the northwestern section of the borough of Brooklyn. ... Francis Scott Key High School (FSKHS) is a four-year public high school in Union Bridge in Carroll County, Maryland, United States. ... Carroll County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Frederick County is located in the western part of the U.S. state of Maryland, bordering the southern border of Pennsylvania and the northeastern border of Virginia. ... USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657), a Benjamin Franklin-class ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Francis Scott Key, the author of the poem The Defense of Fort McHenry, the first verse of became known as The Star-Spangled Banner. ...

Media

  • The Star-Spangled Banner (1942)
    Fred Waring and His Pennsylvanians sing The Star-Spangled Banner in 1942
    The Star-Spangled Banner (1915)
    A 1915 recording of the Star-Spangled Banner as sung by Margaret Woodrow "Woody" Wilson, daughter of Woodrow Wilson
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

Star-spangled banner. ... Fredrick Malcolm Waring (born June 9, 1900 in Tyrone, Pennsylvania, died July 29, 1984, State College, Pennsylvania) was a popular musician, bandleader, and radio and TV personality of the 20th century, sometimes referred to as the man who taught America how to sing. ... MargaretWoodrowWilson-TheStarSpangledBanner. ... Margaret Woodrow Wilson (born April 16, 1886 in Gainesville, Georgia -- died February 12, 1944 in Pondicherry, India) was the daughter of President Woodrow Wilson and Ellen Louise Axson, and served as the First Lady of the United States after her mothers death and between Woodrows second marriage. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856—February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...

See also

This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Hubbell, Jay B. The South in American Literature: 1607-1900. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1954: 300.
  2. ^ a b Hubbell, Jay B. The South in American Literature: 1607-1900. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1954: 301.
  3. ^ Sam Houston. Handbook of Texas Online.
  4. ^ Francis Scott Key Park. Historical Marker Database (February 23, 2006). Retrieved on 2008-02-06.
  5. ^ Francis Scott Key. The New York Times (March 14, 1897). Retrieved on 2008-02-17.
  6. ^ Ibid.
  7. ^ San Francisco Landmark 96: Francis Scott Key Monument, Golden Gate Park. Noehill in San Francisco. Retrieved on 2008-02-17.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Francis Scott Key
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ...

 
 

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