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Encyclopedia > Francis I of France
Francis I
King of France, Count of Provence (more...)
Reign 1 January 151531 March 1547
Coronation 25 January 1515, Reims
Full name called "the Father and Restorer of Letters" (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres)
Titles Count of Angoulême (14961515)
Duke of Valois (14981515)
Jure uxoris Duke of Brittany (15141524)
Dauphin of Viennois: As King of France (1 January 151528 September 1518)
Born 12 September 1494(1494-09-12)
Birthplace Cognac, Charente, France
Died 31 March 1547 (aged 52)
Place of death Château de Rambouillet
Buried Saint Denis Basilica, France
Predecessor Louis XII
Successor Henry II
Consort Claude of France (14991524)
Eleanor of Habsburg (14981558)
Issue François, Dauphin of France (15181536)
Henry II (15191559)
Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (15201537)
Charles, Duke of Orléans (15221545)
Margaret, Duchess of Savoy (15231574)
Royal House Valois Dynasty
Father Charles, Count of Angoulême (14591496)
Mother Louise of Savoy (14761531)

Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494March 31, 1547), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Download high resolution version (805x1026, 160 KB) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Reims (disambiguation). ... Angoulême (Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine. ... 1496 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Counts of Valois Jean-Tristan (1269–1270) in royal domain Charles I (1284–1325) Philip I (1325–1328) in royal domain Philip II (1344–1375) in royal domain Louis I (1386?–1406) Dukes of Valois Charles II (1406–1465) Louis II (1465–1498) in royal domain Marguerite de Valois in... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jure uxoris, Latin: By right of his wife. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Brittany from 1312; described by one of the few known one-word blazons in existence, simply Ermine. ... 1514 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of Viennois. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events A plague of tropical fire ants devastates crops on Hispaniola. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1494 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cognac is a commune in the French département of Charente, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Charente (Saintongeais: Chérente, Occitan: TCharanto) is a department in central France named after the Charente River. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The Château de Rambouillet, which is the summer residence of the Presidents of France, is located in the town of Rambouillet, Yvelines département, France, 50 km (30 miles) southwest of Paris. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Louis XII (b. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... 1499 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Eleanor of Habsburg Eleanor of Habsburg, also called Leonor of Castile or Eleanor of Austria (November 15, 1498 – February 25, 1558) was born Archduchess of Austria and Infanta of Castile, became subsequently in turn queen consort of Portugal (1518–1521) and of France, also duchess of Touraine (1547–1558) as... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Francis (French: François), Dauphin of France, also Francis III, Duke of Brittany (September 28, 1518 – August 10, 1536), was the first son and heir of King Francis I of France and Claude of France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Events A plague of tropical fire ants devastates crops on Hispaniola. ... Year 1536 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Madeleine de Valois, born August 10, 1520 at St. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... Charles dAngouleme, Duc dOrleans, (January 22, 1522–September 9, 1545) was the 3rd son of King Francis I of France and Claude de France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ... Margaret of France, Duchess of Berry (June 5, 1523 - September 14, 1574) was the daughter of Francis I, King of France and his first wife, Claude of France, the daughter of Louis XII, King of France and Anne, Duchess of Brittany. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Main articles: France in the Middle Ages and Early Modern France The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Charles of Orléans, Count of Angoulême (French: Charles dOrléans, Comte dAngoulême) (1459 – 1 January 1496) was a member of the French Orléans family descended from Louis I de Valois, Duke of Orléans, and a minor French prince. ... Events September 23 - Battle of Blore Heath. ... 1496 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake - thousands die. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1494 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Reims (disambiguation). ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Francis I is considered to be France's first Renaissance monarch. His reign saw France make immense cultural advances. He was a contemporary of King Henry VIII of England and of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, his great rivals. This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ...

Contents

Early life

Francis I was born at Cognac, Charente, the son of Charles d'Angoulême (1459January 1, 1496), and of Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476September 22, 1531). His father, Charles d'Angoulême, was the cousin of King Louis XII. In 1498, the four-year-old Francis, already Count of Angoulême, was created Duke of Valois. He was the heir presumptive of Louis XII, who did not succeed in siring sons with any of his three wives. Young Francis was, by instigation of King Louis, in 1506 betrothed and on 18 May 1514 married, to Claude of France (1499-1524), the daughter of Louis XII and Anne of Brittany and heiress of Brittany. Because of the Salic Law that stated that women could not inherit the throne of France, the throne passed to Francis I at the death of Louis XII, as he was the descendant of the eldest surviving male line of the Capetian Dynasty. Claude of France became queen consort. Cognac is a commune in the French département of Charente, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Charente (Saintongeais: Chérente, Occitan: TCharanto) is a department in central France named after the Charente River. ... Charles of Orléans, Count of Angoulême (French: Charles dOrléans, Comte dAngoulême) (1459 – 1 January 1496) was a member of the French Orléans family descended from Louis I de Valois, Duke of Orléans, and a minor French prince. ... Events September 23 - Battle of Blore Heath. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1496 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 26 - Lisbon, Portugal is hit by an earthquake - thousands die. ... Louis XII (b. ... Angoulême (Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine. ... Counts of Valois Jean-Tristan (1269–1270) in royal domain Charles I (1284–1325) Philip I (1325–1328) in royal domain Philip II (1344–1375) in royal domain Louis I (1386?–1406) Dukes of Valois Charles II (1406–1465) Louis II (1465–1498) in royal domain Marguerite de Valois in... An Heir Presumptive (capitalised) is the person provisionally scheduled to inherit a throne, peerage, or other hereditary honor, but whose position can be displaced by the birth of an Heir Apparent or of a new Heir Presumptive with a better claim to the throne. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... Portrait of Anne of Brittany by Jean Bourdichon. ... // The Salic law (Lat. ... Louis XII Louis XII the Father of the People (French: Louis XII le Père du Peuple) (June 27, 1462 - January 1, 1515) was King of France from 1498-January 1, 1515. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


When young Francis ascended the throne in 1515, he was already a king with unprecedented humanist credentials. While his two predecessors, Charles VIII and Louis XII, had spent much of their reigns concerned with Italy they did not much embrace the new intellectual movements coming out of it. Both monarchs continued in the same patterns of behavior that had dominated the French monarchy for centuries. They are considered the last of the medieval French monarchs, but they did lay the groundwork for the Renaissance to come into full swing in France. 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the specific belief system, see Humanism (life stance). ... Charles VIII, called the Affable (French: ; 30 June 1470 – 7 April 1498), was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... Louis XII (b. ...


Contact between the French and Italians in the long running series of wars under Charles and Louis had brought new ideas to France by the time the young Francis was receiving his education. Thus a number of his tutors, such as Desmoulins, his Latin instructor, and Christophe de Longueil were schooled in the new ways of thinking and they attempted to imbue Francis with it. Francis's mother also had a great interest in Renaissance art, which she passed down to her son. One certainly cannot say that Francis received a humanist education; most of his teachers had not yet been affected by the Renaissance. One can, however, state that he clearly received an education more oriented towards humanism than any previous French king.


Kingship

Patron of the Arts

By the time Francis ascended the throne in 1515 the Renaissance had clearly arrived in France, and Francis was an important supporter of the change. Francis became a major patron of the arts. He lent his support to many of the greatest artists of his time and encouraged them to come to France. Some did work for him, including such greats as Andrea del Sarto, and Leonardo da Vinci, whom Francis convinced to leave Italy in the last part of his life. While Leonardo did little painting in his years in France, he brought with him many of his great works, such as the Mona Lisa, and these stayed in France upon his death. 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A self portrait. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mona Lisa (disambiguation). ...


Other major artists whom Francis employed include the goldsmith Benvenuto Cellini, and the painters Rosso, Romano and Primaticcio, all of whom were heavily employed in decorating Francis's various palaces and exceedingly loyal. Francis employed a number of agents in Italy who endeavoured to procure artworks by Italian masters such as Michelangelo, Titian, and Raphael and ship them to France. These agents had some notable successes, even if plans to try to move Leonardo's Last Supper to France proved impractical. When Francis ascended the throne the royal palaces were decorated with only a scattering of great paintings, and not a single piece of sculpture either ancient or modern. It is during Francis' reign that the magnificent art collection of the French kings that can still be seen in the Louvre was truly begun. Gold Salt cellar by Cellini. ... Rosso is a city and ferry crossing in Mauritania on the Senegal River, located approximately 250 km South of Nouakchott and 300 km West of Kaedi. ... Fire in the Borgo, Vatican fresco Giulio Romano (ca 1499? – November 1, 1546) was an Italian painter, architect, and decorator. ... The Holy Family with Sts Elisabeth and John the Baptist (1541-43) Oil on slate, 43,5 x 31 cm Hermitage Museum Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Francesco Primaticcio Francesco Primaticcio (1504 - 1570) was an Italian painter, architect and sculptor who spent most of his career in France. ... Michelangelo (full name Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni) (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564) was a Renaissance sculptor, architect, painter, and poet. ... For other uses, see Titian (disambiguation). ... This page is about the artist. ... This article is about the painting by Leonardo da Vinci. ... This article is about the museum. ...

French Monarchy-
Capetian Dynasty, House of Valois
(Valois-Angoulême branch)

Francis I
Children
   Francis
   Henry II
   Madeleine of Valois
   Charles of Valois
   Margaret of Valois
Henry II
Children
   Francis II
   Elizabeth of Valois
   Claude of Valois
   Louis of Valois
   Charles IX
   Henry III
   Marguerite of Valois
   François, Duke of Anjou
   Joan of Valois
   Victoria of Valois
Francis II
Charles IX
Henry III

The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Image File history File links Blason_France_moderne. ... Francis (French: François), Dauphin of France, also Francis III, Duke of Brittany (September 28, 1518 – August 10, 1536), was the first son and heir of King Francis I of France and Claude of France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Madeleine de Valois, born August 10, 1520 at St. ... Charles dAngouleme, Duc dOrleans, (1522 – 1545) was the 3rd son of King Francis I of France and Claude de France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Margaret of France, Duchess of Berry (June 5, 1523 - September 14, 1574) was the daughter of Francis I, King of France and his first wife, Claude of France, the daughter of Louis XII, King of France and Anne, Duchess of Brittany. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... Elizabeth of Valois, by Sofonisba Anguissola, 1565 Elizabeth of Valois (April 2, 1545 – October 3, 1568) was a daughter of Henry II of France and Catherine de Medici. ... Claude of Valois (November 12, 1547 _ February 21, 1575) was a daughter of King Henry II of France and the wife of Charles II, Duke of Lorraine Categories: Stub | 1547 births | 1575 deaths ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Henry III of France (September 19, 1551 – August 2, 1589), also Henry of Poland (also called Henry of Valois, Henryk Walezy), born Alexandre-Édouard of France, was a member of the House of Valois. ... For other persons named Marguerite de Valois, see Marguerite de Valois (disambiguation). ... Hercule François, Duke of Anjou and Alençon, (March 18, 1555 – June 19, 1584) was the youngest son of Henry II of France and Catherine de Medici. ... Victoria of Valois, (June,1556 – June, 1556) was the last daughter (along with her twin sister, Joan of Valois who was born to King Henri II of France and his wife, Catherine de Medici. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Henry III of France (September 19, 1551 – August 2, 1589), also Henry of Poland (also called Henry of Valois, Henryk Walezy), born Alexandre-Édouard of France, was a member of the House of Valois. ...

Man of letters

Francis I painted in 1515
Francis I painted in 1515

Francis was also renowned as a man of letters. When Francis comes up in a conversation among characters in Castiglione's Book of the Courtier, it is as the great hope to bring culture to the war-obsessed French nation. Not only did Francis support a number of major writers of the period, he was a poet himself, if not one of immense quality. Francis worked hard at improving the royal library. He appointed the great French humanist Guillaume Budé as chief librarian, and began to expand the collection. Francis employed agents in Italy looking for rare books and manuscripts, just as he had looking for art works. During his reign the size of the library increased greatly. Not only did Francis expand the library, there is also, according to Knecht, evidence that he read the books he bought for it, a much rarer feat in the royal annals. Francis set an important precedent by opening his library to scholars from around the world in order to facilitate the diffusion of knowledge. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (475x650, 55 KB) Description François I of France in 1515 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis I of France ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (475x650, 55 KB) Description François I of France in 1515 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Francis I of France ... An intellectual is a person who uses his or her intellect to study, reflect, and speculate on a variety of different ideas. ... i love orange pekoe tea!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ... The Book of the Courtier (Italian Il Cortegiano) was written by Baldassare Castiglione in 1528. ... Guillaume Budé (Latin: Guglielmus Budaeus) (January 26, 1467 – August 23, 1540) was a French scholar. ...


In 1537, Francis signed the Ordonnance de Montpellier, decreeing that his library be given a copy of every book to be sold in France. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Francis's older sister, Marguerite (14921549), Queen of Navarre, was also an accomplished writer, producing the classic, Heptameron. Marguerite of Navarre (April 11, 1492 - December 21, 1549), also known as Marguerite of Angouleme and Margaret of Navarre, was the queen consort of King Henry II of Navarre. ... Also film, 1492: Conquest of Paradise. ... Events July - Ketts Rebellion Francis Xavier arrives in Japan. ... “Navarra” redirects here. ... For the medieval grimoire called the Heptameron, see Pietro dAbano. ...


Construction

Monarchical Styles of
King Francis I
Par la grâce de Dieu, Roi de France
Reference style His Most Christian Majesty
Spoken style Your Most Christian Majesty
Alternative style Monsieur Le Roi

Francis poured vast amounts of money into new structures. He continued the work of his predecessors on the Château d'Amboise and also started renovations on the Château de Blois. Early in his reign, he also began construction of the magnificent Château de Chambord, inspired by the styles of the Italian renaissance, and perhaps even designed by Leonardo. Francis rebuilt the Louvre, transforming it from a medieval fortress into a building of Renaissance splendour. He financed the building of a new City Hall (Hôtel de Ville) for Paris in order to have control over the building's design. He constructed the Château de Madrid and rebuilt the Château de St-Germain-en-Laye. The largest of Francis's building projects was the reconstruction and expansion of the royal château of Fontainebleau, which quickly became his favourite place of residence, as well as the residence of his official mistress - Anne, duchess of Etampes. Each of Francis's projects was luxuriously decorated both inside and outside. Fontainebleau, for instance, had a gushing fountain in its courtyard where quantities of wine were mixed with the water. A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Main articles: France in the Middle Ages and Early Modern France The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... it doesnt exist ... The rear of the Château de Blois Staircase in the Château de Blois The Royal Château de Blois is located in the Loir-et-Cher département in the Loire Valley, in France. ... The front façade of the Château de Chambord, viewed from the south. ... This article is about the museum. ... The Hôtel de Ville houses the office of the Mayor of Paris. ... The Château de Madrid in an 18th century engraving by Jacques Rigaud. ... Coordinates Administration Country Region ÃŽle-de-France Department Yvelines (sous-préfecture) Arrondissement Saint-Germain-en-Laye Canton Chief town of 2 cantons Intercommunality none as of 2005 Mayor Emmanuel Lamy (2001-2008) Statistics Altitude 22 m–107 m (avg. ... The Royal Château of Fontainebleau (in the Seine-et-Marne département) is one of the largest French royal châteaux. ...


Military action

Militarily and politically, Francis's reign was less successful; he tried and failed to become Holy Roman Emperor, and pursued a series of wars in Italy. (See Italian Wars.) Francis managed to defeat the Swiss at Marignano in 1515, which enabled him to capture the Italian city-state of Milan. Coats of arms of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor from 1564 to 1576. ... Combatants France, the Holy Roman Empire, the states of Italy (notably the Republic of Venice, the Duchy of Milan, the Kingdom of Naples, the Papal States, Florence, and the Duchy of Ferrara), England, Scotland, Spain, the Ottoman Empire, the Swiss, Saxony, and others The Italian Wars, often referred to as... Combatants France, Republic of Venice Duchy of Milan Commanders Francis I, Gian Giacomo Trivulzio, Bartolomeo dAlviano, Louis de la Trémoille Maximilian Sforza Strength 30,000 Unknown Casualties The Battle of Marignano, in the phase of the Italian Wars (1494–1559) that is called the War of the League...


Much of the military activity of Francis's reign was focused on his sworn enemy, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. In addition to the Holy Roman Empire, Charles personally ruled Spain, Austria and a number of smaller possessions neighboring France, and was thus a threat to Francis's kingdom. Francis attempted to arrange an alliance with Henry VIII of England. The negotiations took place at the famous Field of the Cloth of Gold of 1520, but ultimately failed. Francis's most devastating defeat occurred at the Battle of Pavia (1525), where he was captured by Charles: Cesare Hercolani hurt his horse and Francis was captured by Spaniards Juan de Urbieta, Diego Dávila and Alonso Pita. For this reason, Hercolani was named "victor of the battle of Pavia". The famous Zuppa alla Pavese, now a renowned recipe was said to have been invented on the spot to feed the captive king right after the battle. Francis was held captive in Madrid and forced to make major concessions to Charles before he was freed. Upon his return to France, however, Francis argued that his agreement with Charles was made under duress, and also claimed that the agreement was void, as his sons had still been taken hostage suggesting his word alone was not trusted, and he repudiated it. Charles (February 24, 1500 – September 21, 1558) was Holy Roman Emperor (as Charles V) from 1519-1558; he was also King of Spain from 1516_1556, officially as Charles I of Spain, although often referred to as Charles V (Carlos Quinto or Carlos V) in Spain and Latin America. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... The Field of Cloth of Gold , or in French Le Camp du Drap dOr, is the name given to a place in Balinghem, between Guînes and Ardres, in France, near Calais. ... “Battle of Pavia” redirects here. ... Events January 21 - The Swiss Anabaptist Movement was born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptized each other in the home of Manzs mother on Neustadt-Gasse, Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union. ... Cesare Hercolani was born in Forlì, Province of Forlì-Cesena, Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy in 1499. ... The Spanish people or Spaniards are an ethnic group native to Spain, in southwestern Europe, who are primarily descended from the autochthonous pre-Indo-European Euskaldunak, Latin, Visigothic, Celtic and Moorish peoples. ... Alonso Pita da Veiga, born in Ferrol in 15th century Galicia, was the most remarkable young officer of the Spanish Tercios fighting under the orders of Count Fernando de Andrade in the Battle of Pavia (Italy), between the years 1513-1525, becoming a lord with the right to wear a... Cesare Hercolani was born in Forlì, Province of Forlì-Cesena, Emilia-Romagna, Northern Italy in 1499. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... For English law on the criminal defence, see duress in English law. ...


In a watershed moment in European diplomacy, Francis came to an understanding with the Ottoman Empire. No formal treaties with the 'infidel empire' were signed, but high-level meetings between the two powers caused them to collude against Charles V, and in 1543 the two powers even combined for a joint naval assault on Nice. Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ...


The New World

In 1524, Francis assisted the citizens of Lyon in financing the expedition of Giovanni da Verrazzano to North America; on this expedition, Verrazzano claimed Newfoundland for the French crown. In 1534, Francis sent Jacques Cartier to explore the St. Lawrence River in Quebec to find certaines îles et pays où l'on dit qu'il se doit trouver grande quantité d'or et autres riches choses ("certain islands and lands where it is said there must be great quantities of gold and other riches"). In 1541, Francis sent Jean-François de la Roque de Roberval to settle Canada and to provide for the spread of "the Holy Catholic faith." Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... This article is about the French city. ... Giovanni da Verrazzano (c. ... North American redirects here. ... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... For other uses, see Jacques Cartier (disambiguation). ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Painting of de La Rocque de Roberval by Jean Clouet, Chateau de Chantilly, France Jean-François de la Roque de Roberval (* c. ...


Bureaucratic reform

In 1539, in his castle in Villers-Cotterêts, Francis signed the edict which made French the administrative language of the kingdom, replacing Latin. This same edict required priests to register births, marriages and deaths and to establish a registry office in every parish. This established the first records of vital statistics with filiations available in Europe. Events May 30 - In Florida, Hernando de Soto lands at Tampa Bay with 600 soldiers with the goal to find gold. ... Villers-Cotterêts is a commune of the Aisne département in the Picardie (Picardy) région in northern France. ... The Ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts is an extensive piece of reform legislation signed into law by François I of France on August 10, 1539 in the city of Villers-Cotterêts. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


Religion

Francis I of France, by Joos van Cleve

It was during Francis's reign that divisions in the Christian religion in Western Europe erupted. Martin Luther's denouncing corruption and self-indulgence in the Roman Catholic Church led to the formation of the Protestant movement which spread through much of Europe, including France. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1906 × 2553 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 447 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1906 × 2553 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses of the term Christian, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


Initially, under the influence of his beloved sister Marguerite de Navarre, Francis was relatively tolerant of the new movement, and even considered it politically useful, as it caused many German princes to turn against his enemy, Charles V. However, Francis's attitude toward Protestantism changed following the "Affair of the Placards", on the night of October 17, 1534, in which notices appeared on the streets of Paris and other major cities denouncing the Papal Mass. A notice was even posted on the door to the king's room, and, it is said, the box in which he kept his handkerchief. Antoine Marcourt, a Protestant pastor, was responsible for the notices. Marguerite of Navarre (April 11, 1492 - December 21, 1549), also known as Marguerite of Angouleme and Margaret of Navarre, was the queen consort of King Henry II of Navarre. ... The Affair of the Placards was an incident involving anti-Catholic posters which appeared in public places in Paris, France during the night of October 18, 1534. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1534 (MDXXXIV) was a common year in the 16th century. ... A Papal Mass is a traditional Catholic mass celebrated by the Pope. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an...


The most fervent Catholics were outraged by the notice's allegations. Francis himself came to view the movement as a plot against him, and began to persecute its followers. Protestants were jailed and executed. In some areas whole villages were destroyed. Printing was censored and leading Protestants like John Calvin forced into exile. The persecutions soon numbered tens of thousands of homeless people. For other uses, see Print. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ...


Francis died in 1547. It is said that "he died complaining about the weight of a crown that he had first perceived as a gift from God"[citation needed]. Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Legacy

Francis's legacy is generally considered a mixed one. He achieved great cultural feats, but they came at the expense of France's economic well being.


The persecution of the Protestants was to lead France into decades of civil war, which did not end until 1598 with the Edict of Nantes. The French Wars of Religion were a series of conflicts fought between Catholics and Huguenots (Protestants) from the middle of the sixteenth century to the Edict of Nantes in 1598, including civil infighting as well as military operations. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Francis died at the Château de Rambouillet on his son and heir's 28th birthday, and is interred with his first wife, Claude de France, Duchess of Bretagne, in Saint Denis Basilica. He was succeeded by his son, Henry II. The Château de Rambouillet, which is the summer residence of the Presidents of France, is located in the town of Rambouillet, Yvelines département, France, 50 km (30 miles) southwest of Paris. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ...


Marriage and Issue

One alleged out-of-wedlock issue, Henri de la Rue.


On May 18, 1514, Francis married Claude, Princess of France (October 13, 1499July 20, 1524), who was the daughter of Louis XII, King of France and Anne, Duchess of Brittany. The couple had seven children: is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1514 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1499 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Louis XII (b. ... Portrait of Anne of Brittany by Jean Bourdichon. ...

Name Birth Death Notes
Louise, Princess of France August 19, 1515 September 21, 1517 Died young. Had no issue.
Charlotte, Princess of France October 23, 1516 September 8, 1524 Died young. Had no issue.
Francis, Dauphin of France February 28, 1518 August 10, 1536 Died young. Had no issue.
Henry II, King of France March 31, 1519 July 10, 1559 Married Catherine de' Medici (1519 - 1589) in 1533. Had issue.
Madeleine, Princess of France August 10, 1520 July 2, 1537 Married James V, King of Scotland (1512 - 1542) in 1537. Had no issue.
Charles of Valois, Duke of Orleans January 22, 1522 September 9, 1545 Died young. Had no issue.
Margaret of France, Duchess of Berry June 5, 1523 September 14, 1574 Married Emmanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy (1528 - 1580) in 1559. Had issue.

On August 7, 1530, Francis I married his second wife Eleanor of Austria. The couple had no children. During his reign, Francis kept two official mistresses at court. The first was Françoise de Foix, Comtesse de Châteaubriand. In 1526, she was replaced by the blonde-haired, cultured Anne de Pisseleu d'Heilly, Duchesse d'Étampes who wielded far more political power at court than her predecessor had done. Another of his earlier mistresses, was allegedly Mary Boleyn, mistress of King Henry VIII and sister of Henry's future wife, Anne Boleyn.[1] is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1517 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Charlotte of Valois (1516 - 1524) was a lesbian lover of Francis I of France and Claude de France, the daughter of Louis XII of France. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March - With the death of Ferdinand II of Aragon, his grandson Charles of Ghent becomes King of Spain as Carlos I. July - Selim I of the Ottoman Empire declares war on the Mameluks and invades Syria. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Francis (French: François), Dauphin of France, also Francis III, Duke of Brittany (September 28, 1518 – August 10, 1536), was the first son and heir of King Francis I of France and Claude of France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events A plague of tropical fire ants devastates crops on Hispaniola. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1536 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519 – January 5, 1589) was born in Florence, Italy, as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici. ... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ... Events January 25 - King Henry VIII of England marries Anne Boleyn, his second Queen consort. ... Madeleine de Valois, born August 10, 1520 at St. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... James V (April 10, 1512 – December 14, 1542) was king of Scotland (September 9, 1513 – December 14, 1542). ... Year 1512 (MDXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Events War resumes between Francis I of France and Emperor Charles V. This time Henry VIII of England is allied to the Emperor, while James V of Scotland and Sultan Suleiman I are allied to the French. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... Charles dAngouleme, Duc dOrleans, (1522 – 1545) was the 3rd son of King Francis I of France and Claude de France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 27 - Battle of Ancrum Moor - Scots victory over superior English forces December 13 - Official opening of the Council of Trent (closed 1563) Battle of Kawagoe - between two branches of Uesugi families and the late Hojo clan in Japan. ... Margaret of France, Duchess of Berry (June 5, 1523 - September 14, 1574) was the daughter of Francis I, King of France and his first wife, Claude of France, the daughter of Louis XII, King of France and Anne, Duchess of Brittany. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Emmanuel Filiberto, Duke of Savoy (July 8, 1528, Chambéry - August 30, 1580, Turin) was Duke of Savoy from 1553 to 1580. ... Events June 19 - Battle of Landriano - A French army in Italy under Marshal St. ... Events March 1 - Michel de Montaigne signs the preface to his most significant work, Essays. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 - Augsburg confession presented to Charles V of Holy Roman Empire. ... Eleanor of Habsburg Eleanor of Habsburg, also called Leonor of Castile or Eleanor of Austria (November 15, 1498 – February 25, 1558) was born Archduchess of Austria and Infanta of Castile, became subsequently in turn queen consort of Portugal (1518–1521) and of France, also duchess of Touraine (1547–1558) as... Françoise de Foix, Comtesse de Châteaubriand (1495 - 1537) was a mistress of Francis I of France. ... January 14 - Treaty of Madrid. ... Anne de Pisseleu dHeilly Anne de Pisseleu dHeilly, duchesse dÉtampes (1508 – 1580), mistress of Francis I of France, daughter of Guillaume de Pisseleu, a nobleman of Picardy. ... Mary Boleyn (c. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and religious...


Ancestors

Francis's ancestors in three generations

 
 
 
 
Louis I, Duke of Orléans
 
 
John, Count of Angoulême
 
 
 
 
 
 
Valentina Visconti
 
 
Charles, Count of Angoulême
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alain IX of Rohan
 
 
Marguerite de Rohan
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marguerite of Brittany
 
Francis I of France
 
 
 
 
 
Louis, Duke of Savoy
 
 
Philip II, Duke of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anne of Cyprus
 
 
Louise of Savoy
 
 
 
 
 
 
Charles I, Duke of Bourbon
 
 
Margaret of Bourbon
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agnes of Burgundy
 

Louis of Orléans can refer to one of the following Dukes: Louis of Valois (1372-1407), son of King Charles V of France King Louis XII of France (1462-1515), Duke of Orléans between 1465 and 1498 Louis of Bourbon (1703-1752), son of Philip of Orléans... John of Orléans, Count of Angoulême and of Périgord (French: Jean dOrléans, comte dAngoulême), 1399 – 30 April 1467, younger son of Louis I, Duke of Orléans and Valentina Visconti, and a grandson of Charles V of France. ... Valentina Visconti (died December 4, 1408) was the wife of Louis de Valois, Duke of Orléans, the brother of Charles VI of France. ... Charles of Orléans, Count of Angoulême (French: Charles dOrléans, Comte dAngoulême) (1459 – 1 January 1496) was a member of the French Orléans family descended from Louis I de Valois, Duke of Orléans, and a minor French prince. ... Louis (Ludovico or Lodovico in Italian, b. ... Philip II (1438-1497), surnamed the Landless was the Duke of Savoy for the brief reign from 1496 to 1497. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Charles I of Bourbon (1401–1456, Château de Moulins) was Count of Clermont-en-Beauvaisis from 1424, and Duke of Bourbon and Auvergne from 1434 to his death, although due to the imprisonment of his father after the Battle of Agincourt, he acquired control of the duchy before this... Margaret of Bourbon (1438-1483) was the daughter of Charles I, Duke of Bourbon (1401-1456) and Agnes of Burgundy (1407-1476), who was the daughter of John I, Duke of Burgundy (1371-1419). ... Agnes of Burgundy (1407- December 1, 1476) was the daughter of John I, Duke of Burgundy (1371-1419) and Margaret of Bavaria. ...

Francis I in fiction

The amorous exploits of Francis inspired the 1832 play by Fanny Kemble (1809-1893} Francis the First and the 1832 play by Victor Hugo (1802-1885), Le Roi s'amuse ("The King's Amusement") featuring the jester Triboulet, which later inspired the opera of Giuseppe Verdi (18131901), Rigoletto. Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fanny Kemble as a young girl Frances Anne Kemble (Fanny Kemble) (1809 - 1893), the actress and author, was Charles Kembles elder daughter; she was born in London, and educated chiefly in France. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... Year 1802 (MDCCCII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Le roi samuse is a play written by Victor Hugo in 1832. ... A triboluet at the Monthey carnival Triboulet (1479-1536) was a microcephalic jester of kings Louis XII and Francis I of France. ... Verdi redirects here. ... Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Rigoletto is an opera in four acts by Giuseppe Verdi. ...


Francis was first played in a George Méliès movie by an unknown actor in 1907, and has also been played by Claude Garry (1910), Aimé Simon-Girard (1937), Sacha Guitry (1937), Gérard Oury (1953), Jean Marais (1955), Pedro Armendáriz (1956), Claude Titre (1962), Bernard Pierre Donnadieu (1990), Timothy West (1998). Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Maries-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Aimé Simon-Girard (March 20, 1889 - June 15, 1950, in Paris, France was a French film actor. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sacha Guitry, born February 21, 1885 in St. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gérard Oury, French actor, writer and producer, b. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean Marais photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1947 Jean Marais, born Jean-Alfred Villain-Marais (December 11, 1913 - November 8, 1998) was a French actor, and the lover of Jean Cocteau. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Pedro Armendáriz, born Pedro Gregorio Armendáriz Hastings (May 9, 1912, Mexico City – June 18, 1963, Los Angeles, California) was a Mexican actor of the Cinema of Mexico and Hollywood. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Timothy West CBE (born October 20, 1934) is a British film, stage and television actor. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Francis receives a mention in a minor story in Laurence Sterne's novel Tristram Shandy. The narrator claims that the king, wishing to win the favour of Switzerland, offers to the make the country the godmother of his son. When, however, their choice of name conflicts declares war. He's also mentioned in Jean de la Brète's novel Reine - Mon oncle et mon curé, where the main character Reine de Lavalle idolizes him after reading his biography, much to the dismay of the local priest. He often receives mentions in novels on the lives of either of the Boleyn sisters - Mary Boleyn (d. 1543) and her sister, Queen Anne Boleyn (executed 1536), both of whom were for a time educated at his court. Mary had, according to several accounts, been Francis's one-time mistress and Anne had been a favourite of his sister: the novels The Lady in the Tower, The Other Boleyn Girl, The Last Boleyn, Dear Heart, How Like You This? and Mademoiselle Boleyn feature Francis in their story. He has also featured as a recurring character in the Showtime series The Tudors, opposite Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Henry VIII and Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn. Francis is played by French actor, Emmanuel Leconte. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (or, more briefly, Tristram Shandy) is a novel by Laurence Sterne. ... Mary Boleyn (c. ... // Events February 21 - Battle of Wayna Daga - A combined army of Ethiopian and Portuguese troops defeat the armies of Adal led by Ahmed Gragn. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and religious... Year 1536 was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... For the 2007 film based on the novel, see The Other Boleyn Girl (film) The Other Boleyn Girl is a historical novel written by British author Philippa Gregory, based on the life of 16th-century aristocrat Mary Boleyn. ... Jonathan Rhys Meyers (born 27 July 1977) is an Irish Golden Globe-winning actor and fashion model. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Natalie Dormer (born 1982 in Reading, Berkshire, England) is an English actress. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marchioness of Pembroke (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and religious...


Samuel Shellabarger's novel The King's Cavalier describes Francis the man, and the cultural and political circumstances of his reign, in some detail. Samuel Shellabarger (1888 - 1954) was an American educator and author of both scholarly works and best-selling historical novels. ...


References

  • Clough, C.H., "Francis I and the Courtiers of Castiglione’s Courtier." European Studies Review. vol viii, 1978.
  • Denieul-Cormier, Anne. The Renaissance in France. trans. Anne and Christopher Fremantle. London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., 1969.
  • Grant, A.J. The French Monarchy, Volume I. New York: Howard Fertig, 1970.
  • Guy, John. Tudor England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988.
  • Jensen, De Lamar. Renaissance Europe. Lexington: D.C. Heath and Company, 1992.
  • Knecht, R.J. Renaissance Warrior and Patron: The Reign of Francis I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  • Major, J. Russell. From Renaissance Monarchy to Absolute Monarchy. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.
  • Seward, Desmond. François I: Prince of the Renaissance. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., 1973.
Francis I of France
Cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty
Born: 12 September 1494 Died: 31 March 1547
French nobility
Preceded by
Charles
Count of Angoulême
1 January 14961 January 1515
Succeeded by
Merged into Royal Domain
(Louise of Savoy as Duchess of Angoulême)
Preceded by
New creation
(Louis)
Duke of Valois
14981 January 1515
Succeeded by
Merged into Royal Domain
(eventually Margaret)
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Louis XII of France
King of France
1 January 151531 March 1547
Succeeded by
Henry II of France
Count of Provence and Forcalquier
as 'Francis I'

1 January 151531 March 1547
Duke of Brittany by marriage
with Claude of Brittany
as 'Francis III'

18 May 151420 July 1524
Succeeded by
Catherine de' Medici
Dauphin of Viennois, Count of Valentinois and of Diois
as 'Francis III of Viennois'

1 January 151528 September 1518
Succeeded by
Francis IV
Preceded by
Maximilian Sforza
Duke of Milan
15151521
Succeeded by
Francesco II Sforza
Persondata
NAME
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION
DATE OF BIRTH
PLACE OF BIRTH
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... The nobility (la noblesse) in France in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period had specific legal and financial rights and prerogatives (the first official list of these prerogatives was established relatively late, under Louis XI of France after 1440), including exemption from paying the taille (except for non... Charles of Orléans, Count of Angoulême (French: Charles dOrléans, Comte dAngoulême) (1459 – 1 January 1496) was a member of the French Orléans family descended from Louis I de Valois, Duke of Orléans, and a minor French prince. ... Angoulême (Angoumois) in western France was part of the Carolingian empire as the kingdom of Aquitaine. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1496 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Louise of Savoy Louise of Savoy (September 11, 1476 – September 22, 1531) was the mother of Francis I of France. ... Louis XII (b. ... Val dOis, the valley of the Oise river, was a feudal fief in what today is called as Picardie in Northern France. ... 1498 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Marguerite de Valois, see Marguerite de Valois (disambiguation). ... Louis XII (b. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... The land of Provence has a history quite separate from that of any of the larger nations of Europe. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Brittany from 1312; described by one of the few known one-word blazons in existence, simply Ermine. ... Claude of France with her daughters, Louise and Charlotte (who died young); Madeleine, Queen of Scotland (right); her youngest daughter, Marguerite, duchess of Savoy (left), and Eleanor of Spain Claude of France (14 October 1499 – 20 July 1524), Queen consort of France and duchess of Brittany in her own right... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1514 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 1, 1524/5 - Giovanni da Verrazano lands near Cape Fear (approx. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519 – January 5, 1589) was born in Florence, Italy, as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of Viennois. ... Count of Valentinois (French: Compte de Valentinois; Italian: Conteggio dei Valentino), is an extinct title in the French peerage. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events A plague of tropical fire ants devastates crops on Hispaniola. ... Francis (French: François), Dauphin of France, also Francis III, Duke of Brittany (September 28, 1518 – August 10, 1536), was the first son and heir of King Francis I of France and Claude of France, daughter of Louis XII of France. ... Maximilian Sforza was Duke of Milan between the occupations of Louis XII of France in 1500?, and Francis I of France in 1515. ... The following is a list of rulers of Milan from the 13th century to 1859. ... 1515 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... Francesco II Sforza (d. ... It has been suggested that Regents: France and French States be merged into this article or section. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Hugh Capet[1] (c. ... Robert II the Pious (French: Robert II le Pieux) (March 27, 972 – July 20, 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. ... Henry I (French: Henri Ier) (May 4, 1008–August 4, 1060) was King of France from 1031 to 1060. ... Philip I (23 May 1053 – 29 July 1108) was King of France from 1060 to his death. ... Louis VI the Fat (French: Louis VI le Gros) (December 1, 1081 – August 1, 1137) was King of France from 1108 to 1137. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ... Louis VIII the Lion (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Louis IX (25 April 1215 – 25 August 1270), commonly Saint Louis, was King of France from 1226 to his death. ... Philip III the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... “Philip the Fair” redirects here. ... Louis X of France Louis X the Quarreller, also called the Headstrong or the Stubborn, (French: Louis X le Hutin, Spanish: Luis el Obstinado) (October 4, 1289 – June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... John I the Posthumous (French: Jean Ier le Posthume) (November 15, 1316 – November 20, 1316) was King of France for the five days he lived. ... Philip V (17 November 1293 – 3 January 1322), called the Tall (French: le Long), was King of France and Navarre (as Philip II) and Count of Champagne from 1316 to his death, and the second to last of the House of Capet. ... Charles IV of France, also Charles I of Navarre, called the Fair (French: le Bel) (11 December 1294 – 1 February 1328), was the King of France and Navarre and Count of Champagne from 1322 to his death: the last French king of the senior Capetian lineage. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Philip VI of France Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293 – August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death, and Count of Anjou, Maine, and Valois 1325–1328. ... John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France 1350–1364, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou and Maine 1332–1350, Count of Poitiers 1344–1350, and Duke of Guienne 1345–1350. ... Charles V the Wise (French: Charles V le Sage) (January 21, 1338 – September 16, 1380) was king of France from 1364 to 1380 and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Charles VI Charles VI the Well-Beloved, later known as the Mad (French: Charles VI le Bien-Aimé, later known as le Fol) (December 3, 1368 – October 21, 1422) was a King of France (1380 – 1422) and a member of the Valois Dynasty. ... Charles VII the Victorious, a. ... Louis XI (July 3, 1423 – August 30, 1483), called the Prudent (French: ) and the Universal Spider (Old French: luniverselle aragne) or the Spider King, was the King of France from 1461−83. ... Charles VIII, called the Affable (French: ; 30 June 1470 – 7 April 1498), was King of France from 1483 to his death. ... For the administrative and social structures of early modern France, see Ancien Régime in France. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Louis XII (b. ... For the administrative and social structures of early modern France, see Ancien Régime in France. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... Charles IX (June 27, 1550 – May 30, 1574) born Charles-Maximilien, was a member of the Valois Dynasty, King of France from 1560 until his death. ... Henry III of France (September 19, 1551 – August 2, 1589), also Henry of Poland (also called Henry of Valois, Henryk Walezy), born Alexandre-Édouard of France, was a member of the House of Valois. ... For the administrative and social structures of early modern France, see Ancien Régime in France. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Henry IV of France, also Henry III of Navarre (13 December 1553 – 14 May 1610), ruled as King of France from 1589 to 1610 and King of Navarre from 1572 to 1610. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... Louis XV (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1715 until his death. ... Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste de France (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 – June 8, 1795), from birth to 1789 known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy; then from 1789 to 1791 as Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois; and from 1791 to 1793 as Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France, was the son of King Louis... Look up De jure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Map of the First French Empire in 1811, with the Empire in dark blue and satellite states in light blue Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Constitutional Monarchy Emperor  - 1804 - 1814/1815 Napoleon I  - 1814/1815 Napoleon II Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif Historical era... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt (March 20, 1811 – July 22, 1832) was the son of Napoleon Bonaparte, and briefly the second Emperor of the French. ... Kingdom of France Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King of France and Navarre  - 1814-1824 Louis XVIII  - 1824-1830 Charles X  - 1830 Louis XIX  - 1830 Henri V Legislature Parliament History  - Louis XVIII restored 6 April, 1814  - July Revolution 21 January, 1830 Currency French Franc Following the ousting of... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Louis XVIII (17 November 1755 – 16 September 1824), was a King of France and Navarre. ... Charles X (October 9, 1757 – November 6, 1836) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1824 until the French Revolution of 1830, when he abdicated. ... Louis XIX, King of France and of Navarre (Louis-Antoine, duc dAngoulême) (August 6, 1775 – June 3, 1844) was the eldest son of the comte dArtois (later King Charles X of France) and Marie-Thérèse de Savoie. ... Henri Charles Ferdinand Marie Dieudonné dArtois, comte de Chambord (September 29, 1820 – August 24, 1883) technically reigned as Henry V, King of France and Navarre from August 2 to August 9, 1830. ... Kingdom of France Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy King of the French  - 1830-1848 Louis-Phillipe Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Chamber of Peers  - Lower house Chamber of Deputies History  - July Revolution 1830  - Revolution of 1848 1848 Currency French Franc The July Monarchy (1830-1848) was a period of... Philippe I, Duc dOrléans, the founder of the House of Orléans Philip II dOrléans - the Regent of France for the young Louis XV. Louis dOrléans, Duke of Orléans, the 3d Duke Louis Philippe I called le Gros or the Fat Philippe Égalit... Louis-Philippe I, King of the French (October 6, 1773 – August 26, 1850) was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 in what was known as the July Monarchy. ... Map of the French Second Empire Capital Paris Language(s) French Government Monarchy Emperor  - 1852-1870 Napoleon III Legislature Parliament  - Upper house Senate  - Lower house Corps législatif History  - French coup of 1851 December 2 1851  - Established 1852  - Disestablished September 4, 1870 Currency French Franc The Second French Empire or... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... This article is about the President of the French Republic and Emperor of the French. ...

 
 

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