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Encyclopedia > Francis Bacon (painter)
Francis Bacon

Study after Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1953)
Born 28 October 1909(1909-10-28)
Dublin, Ireland
Died 28 April 1992 (aged 82)
Madrid, Spain
Field Painting
Works Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944)

Painting (1946) (1946)
Study after Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1953)
Figure with Meat (1954)
Portrait of Michel Leiris (1976)
Three Studies for a Self Portrait (1985)
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (490x624, 63 KB)Francis Bacon Study after Velázquezs Portrait of Pope Innocent X (1953) desmoinesregister. ... Study after Velázquezs Portrait of Pope Innocent X , 1953 is a painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion is a 1944 triptych painted by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... Painting (1946) is a 1946 painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... Study after Velázquezs Portrait of Pope Innocent X , 1953 is a painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... Figure with Meat (1954) is a painting by Francis Bacon. ...

Francis Bacon (28 October 190928 April 1992) was an Irish-born figurative painter. He was a collateral descendant of the Elizabethan philosopher Francis Bacon. His artwork is known for its bold, austere, and often grotesque or nightmarish imagery. is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The Creation of Adam, a figurative work by Michelangelo Figurative art describes artwork - particularly paintings - which are clearly derived from real object sources, and are therefore by definition representational. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... A collateral descendant is a relative descended from a brother or sister of an ancestor, and thus a cousin. ... Elizabethan redirects here. ... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the word itself. ... The current usage of the term nightmare refers to a dream which causes the sleeper a strong unpleasant emotional response. ...

Contents

Early life

Francis Bacon's birthplace at 63 Baggot Street Dublin
Francis Bacon's birthplace at 63 Baggot Street Dublin

Francis Bacon was born in Dublin to English parents. His father, Eddy Bacon, was a veteran of the Boer War who became a racehorse trainer. His mother Winnie (née Firth), an heiress to a steel business and coal mine, was noted for her outgoing, gregarious nature, a stark contrast to her highly-strung and argumentative husband. Francis was cared for by the family nurse, Jessie Lightfoot. A sickly child with asthma and a violent allergy to dogs and horses, Bacon was often given morphine to ease his suffering during attacks. The family shifted houses often, moving back and forth between Ireland and England several times during this period, leading to a feeling of displacement that would remain with the artist throughout his life. In 1911 the family lived in Cannycourt House near Kilcullen, County Kildare, but later moved to Westbourne Terrace, London, close by to where Eddy Bacon worked at the Territorial Force Records Office. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Boers in combat (1881). ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... A nanny is a person who looks after the child or children of one family in their -- the childs -- home. ... Allergy is an abnormal reaction to a substance foreign to the body that is acquired, predictable and rapid. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog (Canis lupus familiaris) is a domestic subspecies of the wolf, a mammal of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... This article is about the drug. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the town. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Territorial Army (TA) is the principal and Volunteer reserve force of the British Army, the land armed forces branch of the United Kingdom, and composed mostly of part-time soldiers paid at a similar rate, while engaged on military activities, as their Regular equivalents. ...


Abbeyleix

On returning to Ireland after World War I, Bacon was sent to live for a time with his maternal grandmother, Winifred Supple, and her husband Kerry, at Farmleigh, Abbeyleix, County Laois. Eddy Bacon later bought Farmleigh from his mother-in-law, though they soon moved again to Straffan Lodge in Naas, County Kildare, the birthplace of both parents. Though Francis was a shy child, he enjoyed dressing up. This, coupled with his effeminate manner, often enraged his father and created a distance between them. A story emerged in 1992[1] of his father having had Francis horsewhipped by their Irish groom. In 1924 his parents moved to Gloucestershire, first to Prescott House in Gotherington, then to Linton Hall, situated near the border with Herefordshire. Francis spent eighteen months boarding at Dean Close School, Cheltenham, from the third term of 1924 until April 1926. This was to be his only brush with a formal education as he ran away after several weeks. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference S435850 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 129 m Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   1,383  2,379 Abbeyleix or Abbeylaois (Irish: , meaning Laois Abbey) is a town in County Laois, Republic of Ireland about 14 km from Portlaoise. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Portlaoise Code: LS Area: 1,719 km² Population (2006) 69,012 Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference N893196 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 114 m Population (2006) 20,044  Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ... In humans, shyness is the feeling of apprehension or lack of confidence experienced in regard to social association with others, e. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... A groom is responsible for the welfare of their employers horses. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Gotherington is a village north of Cheltenham in Gloucestershire. ... For the similarly named county in the East of England, see Hertfordshire. ... Dean Close School is a co-educational independent school in Cheltenham, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Cheltenham (disambiguation). ...


At a fancy-dress party at the Firth family house at Cavendish Hall, Suffolk, Francis dressed up as a flapper with an Eton crop, beaded dress, lipstick, high heels, and a long cigarette holder. Halloween costumes A costume party (chiefly in the U.S. and Canada) or a fancy dress party (chiefly in Britain and Australia), mainly in contemporary Western culture, is a type of party where guests dress up in a costume. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... For other uses, see Flapper (disambiguation). ...


In 1926 the family moved back to Ireland, and Straffan Lodge. His sister, Ianthe (b. 1921), recalls that Bacon made drawings of ladies with cloche hats and long cigarette holders.[2] Later that year, Francis was banished from Straffan Lodge following an incident in which his father found him admiring himself in front of a large mirror draped in his mother's underwear. For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... Cloche (French language for bell) may refer to the following: Bell (instrument), especially in music directions A glass covering for protecting plants from cold temperatures A close-fitting womens hat with a deep rounded crown and narrow rim A restaurants bell-shaped cover for a plate of food... Underwear redirects here. ...


London, Berlin and Paris

Bacon spent the autumn and winter of 1926 in London, with the help of an allowance of £3 a week from his mother's trust fund, living on his instincts, simply 'drifting', and reading Nietzsche. When he was broke, Bacon found that by the simple expedient of rent-dodging and petty theft, he could manage a reasonable economy. To supplement his income, he briefly tried his hand at domestic service, but although he enjoyed cooking, he quickly became bored and resigned. He was sacked from a telephone answering position at a shop selling women's clothes in Poland Street, Soho, after writing a poison pen letter to the owner. He discovered that he attracted a certain type of rich man, an attraction he was quick to take advantage of, having developed a taste for good food and wine. One of the men was an ex-army friend of his father, another breeder of race-horses, named Harcourt-Smith. Bacon later claimed that his father had asked this friend to take him 'in-hand' and 'make a man of him'. Francis had a difficult relationship with his father, once admitting to being sexually attracted to him. Doubtless, Eddy Bacon was aware of his friend's reputation for virility, but not of his penchant for young men. Friedrich Nietzsche, 1882 Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 - August 25, 1900) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... It has been suggested that servant (domestic) be merged into this article or section. ... An anonymous poison pen letter to a former teacher. ...


In the early Spring of 1927, Bacon was taken by Harcourt-Smith to the opulent, decadent, "wide open" Berlin of the Weimar Republic, staying together at the Hotel Adlon.[3] It is likely that Bacon saw Fritz Lang's Metropolis during this time. Anthem Das Lied der Deutschen Germany during the Weimar period, with the Free State of Prussia (in blue) as the largest state Capital Berlin Language(s) German Government Republic President  - 1918-1925 Friedrich Ebert  - 1925-1933 Paul von Hindenburg Chancellor  - 1919 Philipp Scheidemann(first)  - 1933 Kurt von Schleicher (last) Legislature... Hotel Adlon, 2005 Hotel Adlon is a hotel in the heart of Berlin Germany. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... Metropolis is a very early science fiction film that was produced in Germany during the brief years of the Weimar Republic. ...


Bacon spent two months in Berlin, though Harcourt-Smith left after just one — "He soon got tired of me, of course, and went off with a woman...I didn't really know what to do, so I hung on for a while, and then, since I'd managed to keep a bit of money, I decided to go to Paris." Bacon then spent the next year and a half in Paris. He met Yvonne Bocquentin, pianist and connoisseur, at the opening of an exhibition. Aware of his own need to learn the French language, Bacon lived for three months with Madame Bocquentin and her family at their house near Chantilly. At the Château de Chantilly (Musée Condé) he saw Nicolas Poussin's Massacre of the Innocents, a painting to which he was often to refer in his own later work. From Chantilly, he went to an exhibition that was largely to inspire him to take up painting. His visit to a 1927 exhibition of 106 drawings by Picasso at the Galerie Paul Rosenberg, Paris, aroused his artistic interest, and he often took the train into Paris five or more times a week to see shows and art exhibitions. Bacon saw Abel Gance's epic silent film Napoléon at the Paris Opéra when it premiered in April 1927. From the autumn of 1927, Bacon stayed at the Paris Hôtel Delambre in Montparnasse. This article is about the capital of France. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Chantilly is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. ... The front entrance and courtyard at the Château de Chantilly The Château de Chantilly is a historic château located in the town of Chantilly, France. ... Poussin redirects here. ... The Holy Innocents by Giotto di Bondone. ... Picasso redirects here. ... Paul Rosenberg (1881-1959) was a French art dealer, renown for representing Picasso, Braque, and Matisse. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Abel Gance (October 25, 1889 - November 10, 1981) was a world-renowned French film director, producer, writer, actor and editor. ... Napoléon is an epic (1927) silent French film directed by Abel Gance that tells the story of the rise of Napoleon I of France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


1930s

Bacon returned to London in late 1928 or early 1929, and started work as an interior designer. He took a studio in a converted garage, 17 Queensberry Mews West, South Kensington, and shared the upper floor with Eric Alden (who was later to become his first collector) and his nanny, Jessie Lightfoot. In the first issue of Cahiers d'Art for 1929, Bacon saw Picasso's painted biomorphic figures, reproduced in an article by editor Christian Zervos: Picasso à Dinard, Été 1928. (Likely to have been bought either from Zwemmers bookshop, on the Charing Cross Road, or in Paris.) The 1927 show at Rosenberg's in Paris had been of Neo-classical drawings, and it was the 1928 Les Baigneuses and Le Baiser in Cahiers d'Art, that gave Bacon his direction as a painter. Interior design is a practice concerned with anything that is found inside a space - walls, windows, doors, finishes, textures, light, furnishings and furniture. ... For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The junction with Old Brompton Road and Pelham Street, outside South Kensington tube station. ... // The hobby of collecting consists of acquiring specific items based on a particular interest of the collector. ... Vilaine]] département. ... Charing Cross Road, London, looking North from its junction with Long Acre. ... Late Baroque classicizing: G. P. Pannini assembles the canon of Roman ruins and Roman sculpture into one vast imaginary gallery (1756) Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture that...


Bacon was befriended by Geoffrey Gilbey, then the racing correspondent for the Daily Express, and for a time worked as his racing secretary. Gilbey had a house in Ormonde Gate, Chelsea. Bacon advertised himself as a "gentleman's companion" in The Times, on the front page (then reserved for personal messages and insertions).[4] Among the many answers carefully vetted by Nanny Lightfoot was one from an elderly cousin of Douglas Cooper, at that time owner of one of the finest collection of modern art in England. The gentleman, having paid Bacon for his services, found him part-time work as a telephone operator in a London club and further sought Cooper's help in promoting Bacon's developing skill as a designer of furniture and interiors. Cooper also commissioned a desk from Bacon in battleship gray around this time. For other uses, see Daily Express (disambiguation). ... Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... A telephone operator at work on a private switchboard A telephone operator is either a person who provides assistance to a telephone caller, usually in the placing of operator assisted telephone calls such as calls from a pay phone, collect calls (called reversed-charge calls in the UK), calls which... For the UK band, see Furniture (band). ... A desk is a furniture form and a class of table. ...


In 1929 he met Eric Hall at the Bath Club, Dover Street, London, where Bacon was working at the telephone exchange. Hall (who was general manager of Peter Jones) was to be both patron and lover to Bacon, in an often torturous relationship. Dover Street is a street in Mayfair, London, England. ... Peter Jones is one of the largest and best known department stores in London. ... ...


'The 1930 Look in British Decoration'

The first show in the winter of 1929, at Queensberry Mews, was of Bacon's carpet rugs and furniture (a rug was purchased by Hall), but may have included Painted screen (c.1929–1930) and Watercolour (1929), both bought by Eric Alden. Watercolour (1929) his earliest surviving painting, seems to have evolved from his rug designs, in turn influenced by the paintings and tapestries of Jean Lurçat. Sydney Butler (daughter of Samuel Courtauld and wife of Rab Butler) commissioned a glass and steel table and a set of stools for the dining room of her Smith Square house.... Bacon's Queensberry Mews studio was featured in the August 1930 issue of The Studio magazine, in a double page article entitled "The 1930 Look in British Decoration". The piece showed work including a large round mirror, some rugs and tubular steel and glass furniture largely influenced by the International Style, Marcel Breuer, Le Corbusier / Charlotte Perriand and Eileen Gray. This article is about tapestry the textile. ... Jean Lurçat (July 1, 1892 - January 6, 1966) was a French painter and tapestry designer. ... There have been at least two prominent people called Samuel Courtauld. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... Smith Square is a square located in Westminster, part of the City of Westminster in London, which is notable for St. ... The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1927) The Weissenhof Estate in Stuttgart, Germany (1930) The International style was a major architectural style of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Marcel Lajos Breuer (May 21, 1902 Pécs, Hungary – July 1, 1981 New York City), architect and furniture designer, was an influential Hungarian-born modernist of Jewish descent. ... Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, who chose to be known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965), was a Swiss-born architect, designer, urbanist, writer and also painter, who is famous for his contributions to what now is called Modern Architecture. ... Eileen Gray Bibendum chair by Eileen Gray E1027 table by Eileen Gray Early Photograph of Eileen Grays E-1027 villa. ...


He returned to Germany in 1930. A dramatic studio portrait taken of Bacon by Helmar Lerski, a Swiss photographer and cinematographer, probably dates from this visit. Bacon was later to tell Stephen Spender that he had been very impressed by the work of a photographer who had produced striking effects using mirrors and natural light filtered through screens, but that he could not remember the artist's name. Later that year Francis Bacon met Roy de Maistre, an Australian painter who was to become a close friend and mentor. De Maistre's circle included Graham Sutherland, Henry Moore and Douglas Cooper. A second exhibition was held between 4-22 November at 17 Queensberry Mews. Alongside de Maistre and Jean Sheppeard, Bacon showed four paintings and one print. Gouache (1929) may be the piece titled as A Brick Wall in the hand-list. Painting (1929–1930) (probably the work listed as Tree by the Sea) is Bacon's earliest surviving oil painting. Both were bought by Alden. The two other paintings (Self-portrait and Two Brothers) and print (Dark Child in an edition of three) are now lost. Human hends (1933-1940). ... Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE, (February 28, 1909, London – July 16, 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. ... Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... This article is about the sculptor Henry Moore. ... Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing, normally on paper. ...


Bacon left the Queensberry Mews West studio in 1931, and was not to have a settled space for some years. Bacon probably shared a studio with Roy de Maistre, about 1931/1932, at Carlyle Studios, (just off the Kings Road), in Chelsea. Portrait (1932) and Portrait (c.1931–1932) (the latter bought by Diana Watson) both show a round-faced youth with diseased skin (painted after Bacon saw Ibsen's Ghosts), and date from a brief stay in a studio on the Fulham Road. In 1932, Bacon was commissioned by Gladys MacDermot, an Irish woman who had lived in Australia, to redesign much of the decoration and furniture of her flat at 98 Ridgmount Gardens in Bloomsbury. Bacon recalled that she was 'always filling me up with food'. This is a list of diseases of the skin. ... Henrik Johan Ibsen (March 20, 1828–May 23, 1906) was an extremely influential Norwegian playwright who was largely responsible for the rise of the modern realistic drama. ... Ghosts (original Norwegian title: Gengangere) is a play by the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. ...


In April 1933, he moved to 71 Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea Road from Ebury Street, where de Maistre had his temporary studio). The studio there was in a converted garage (like the Queensberry Mews West studio), a friend, the interior designer (and property developer) Arundell Clarke, had had his showroom there before moving on to Mayfair. Mozart Terrace Bronze statue of Mozart Plaque to Mozart Plaque to Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson Plaque to Edith Evans Ebury Street is a street in Belgravia, City of Westminster London. ...


Crucifixion (1933)

Douglas Cooper, then curator (and part owner/co-director with Fred Mayor) of the Mayor Gallery, in Cork Street, arranged for one of Bacon's paintings, Women in the Sunlight, to be included a group show in April 1933. It was also thanks to Cooper that Bacon's Crucifixion was reproduced in Herbert Read's book Art Now (opposite a 1929 Baigneuse by Picasso — plates 60/61). The publication was accompanied by an exhibition of the works, in October, at the Mayor Gallery, where Crucifixion was shown as Composition. 1933. Crucifixion was subsequently purchased by Sir Michael Sadler (who, other than friends or relations, was the first to buy a painting), and who also commissioned a second version, Crucifixion (chalk, gouache and pencil), and sent Bacon an x-ray photograph of his own skull, with a request that he paint a portrait from it. Bacon duly incorporated the x-ray directly into The Crucifixion. Cork Street is a street in the West End of London, England with a number of small commercial art galleries. ... Sir Herbert Edward Read, MC, DSO (1893–1968) was an English anarchist poet, and critic of literature and art. ... Sir Michael Ernest Sadler (born July 3, 1861 - died October 14, 1943) was a British historian, educationalist and university administrator. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ...


Wound for a Crucifixion

Composition (Figure) (1933) (gouache, pastel and pen and ink on paper)
Composition (Figure) (1933) (gouache, pastel and pen and ink on paper)

At the start of 1934, with the help of Arundell Clarke, who had just taken over the building, Bacon set up a gallery space in the cellar of Sunderland House, Curzon Street, Mayfair, with plans to deal in his own work and organize his own shows. In February 1934, Bacon held his first solo show, Paintings by Francis Bacon, of seven of his oil paintings and five or six gouaches, at the new Transition gallery. This was to be the only show at the Transition gallery. All but two gouaches of figures in flight (Composition (Figure) (1933) (gouache, pastel and pen and ink on paper) and Composition (Figures) (1933) (gouache, pastel and pen and ink on paper)) purchased by his cousin Diana Watson were afterwards destroyed by Bacon. Among these was the Wound for a Crucifixion, destroyed despite having a prospective purchaser in Eric Alden, and one of a very few that Bacon was to express regret at its loss. Image File history File links Composition_(Figure). ... Image File history File links Composition_(Figure). ... Curzon Street is located within the exclusive Mayfair district of London. ... For other uses, see Mayfair (disambiguation). ... Corridor in the Asylum, black chalk and gouache on pink paper by Van Gogh Gouache (from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash) or Bodycolour (or Bodycolor, the terms preferred by Art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. ...


Two studio interiors survive from 1934: Studio Interior (1934) and Corner of the Studio (1934) (purchased by Gladys MacDermot). Interior of a Room survives from circa 1935 (c.1933 in Alley/Rothenstein).


Bacon visited Paris in 1935, purchasing there a second-hand book on diseases of the mouth containing high quality hand-coloured plates of both open mouths and oral interiors, which both haunted and obsessed him for the remainder of his life. (Bacon had sinus problems since childhood and had undergone an operation on the roof of his mouth at some stage in the mid-1930s.) He also saw, for the first of many times, Eisenstein's The Battleship Potemkin in 1935,[5] the scene of the nurse screaming on the Odessa steps later becoming a major theme in his paintings, with the angularity of Eisenstein's image often combined with the thick red palette of his recently purchased medical tome. Oral pathology, also known in the United States of America as oral and maxillofacial pathology is the specialty of dentistry and pathology which deals with the nature, identification, and management of diseases affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The palate is the roof of the mouth in humans and vertebrate animals. ... The 1930s were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the [[. In East Asia, the rise of militarism occurred. ... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... The Battleship Potemkin (Russian: , ), sometimes rendered as The Battleship Potyomkin, is a 1925 silent film directed by Sergei Eisenstein and produced by Mosfilm. ... Potemkin Stairs in Odessa, Ukraine. ...


In the Winter of 1935-6, Roland Penrose and Herbert Read, making a first selection for the International Surrealist Exhibition (which was to be held in London from 11 June to 4 July 1936), visited his studio at 71 Royal Hospital Road, Chelsea, saw "three or four large canvases including one with a grandfather clock," but found his work "insufficiently surreal to be included in the show." Bacon claimed that Penrose had said to him "Mr. Bacon, don't you realize a lot has happened in painting since the Impressionists?" In 1937 (or late in 1936), Bacon moved from 71 Royal Hospital Road to the top floor of 1 Glebe Place, Chelsea, which Eric Hall had rented (and kept until 1943). Patrick White had moved to London, into a small flat in Ebury Street, in 1936, and, on meeting de Maistre in his ground-floor studio there, quickly fell in love with him. The following year, White moved to the top two floors of the building where de Maistre now had his studio, on Eccleston Street, and commissioned from Bacon, who was by now a friend, a writing desk (with wide drawers and a red linoleum top). White also bought the glass and steel dining table from Rab and Sydney Butler. Sir Herbert Edward Read, MC, DSO (1893–1968) was an English anarchist poet, and critic of literature and art. ... Max Ernst. ... This article is about the art movement. ... For the football player, see Patrick White (football player). ...


Abstraction from the Human Form

In January 1937, at Thomas Agnew and Sons, 43 Old Bond Street, London, Bacon was in a group show, Young British Painters, with Graham Sutherland, John Piper, Victor Pasmore, Ivon Hitchens, Roy de Maistre, Ceri Richards, and Julian Trevelyan. Eric Hall, who was also a friend of Jerry Agnew, organized the show; Agnew's was then known for shows of Old Master paintings. Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... John Egerton Christmas Piper CH (December 13, 1903 – June 28, 1992) was a well-known 20th century English painter and printmaker who lived for many years at Fawley Bottom near Henley-on-Thames. ... Ivon Hitchens (3 March 1893 - August 1979) was an English painter who started exhibiting during the 1920s. ... An Old Master (or old master) is one of the great European painters who lived 1500 through 1800, or a painting by one of these painters. ...


Four works by Bacon were shown: Figures in a Garden (1936), purchased by Diana Watson; Abstraction, and Abstraction from the Human Form, known from magazine photographs (they prefigure Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) in variously having a tripod structure (Abstraction), bared teeth (Abstraction from the Human Form), and both being biomorphic in form); Seated Figure is lost entirely. Look up tripod in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Teeth redirects here. ...


Figures in a Garden alone remains of paintings from 1936, however, a small sketch in black ink on lined paper, Biomorphic Drawing, in the collection of the Estate, at the Hugh Lane gallery, which resembles Abstraction (1936), may be a survivor from this year. Sketches of a lion 1980 pen and china ink on paper by Frans Koppelaar A sketch is a rapidly executed freehand drawing that is not intended as a finished work, often consisting of a multitude of overlapping lines. ... REDIRECT Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery ...


A small self-portrait, putatively dated to 1930 and identified with the self-portrait in the hand-list to the Queensberry Mews show, was exhibited at the Fine Arts and Antiques Fair, Olympia, London in 1998; however, it has been claimed on technical grounds that it dates from 1937 onwards (the canvas board on which it was painted was not available until then, although this has been disputed). Stylistically, the work fits best around the mid 1930s. The work has an unusual provenance (it was kept by Bacon until 1982 and then given away), but the attribution to Bacon is sound (although a detailed technical analysis remains to be done). Self Portrait is a 1970 double album by Bob Dylan. ...


On 1 June 1940 Bacon's father died. Bacon was named sole Trustee and Executor of his father's will, which requested that the funeral be as 'private and simple as possible'. The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... An executor is a person named by a maker of a will to carry out the directions of the will. ... For other uses, see Funeral (disambiguation). ...


Figure Getting Out of a Car (c. 1939–1940)

Bacon, unfit for active service, volunteered for Civil Defence and worked full-time in the ARP (Air Raid Precautions) rescue service. But the fine dust of bombed London worsened his asthma and he was discharged. So, at the height of The Blitz, Eric Hall rented a cottage for Bacon and himself at Bedales Lodge, Steep, near Petersfield, Hampshire. The old United States civil defense logo. ... Air Raid Precautions (ARP) was an organisation in the United Kingdom dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air-raids. ... Look up dust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... Petersfield is a market town in the English county of Hampshire, situated on the northern border of the South Downs. ...

Man in a Cap (c.1943)
Man in a Cap (c.1943)

Figure Getting Out of a Car (c. 1939 - 1940) was painted here but is known only from an early 1946 photograph taken by Peter Rose Pulham (taken shortly before it was painted over by Bacon and retitled Landscape with Car). An ancestor to the biomorphic form of the central panel of Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944), the composition was suggested by a photograph of Hitler getting out of a car at one of the Nuremberg rallies, (Bacon claims to have "copied the car and not much else.") Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x632, 92 KB)Francis Bacon Man in a Cap (c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x632, 92 KB)Francis Bacon Man in a Cap (c. ... The Nazi partys 1936 Nuremberg Rally was its largest. ...


Man in a Cap, and Seated Man (recto) / Man Standing (verso) (now separated), both on composition board and from about 1943, are abandoned works. The composition of Man in a Cap derives from a picture of Joseph Goebbels that appeared in Picture Post. A photograph of Hitler from the same issue was the basis for Seated Man, and the more roughly painted Man Standing. Paul Joseph Goebbels (German pronunciation: IPA: ; English generally IPA: ) (October 29, 1897 – May 1, 1945) was a German politician and Minister for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda during the National Socialist regime from 1933 to 1945. ... Picture Post dated 21 September 1940. ...


The Millais House studio, 7 Cromwell Place: 1943 - 1951

Returning from Hampshire at the latter part of 1943, Bacon and Hall took the ground floor of 7 Cromwell Place, South Kensington, John Everett Millais' old house and studio. High vaulted and north lit, it had had its roof recently bombed - Bacon was able to adapt a large old billiard room at the back of the house as his own studio. Nanny Lightfoot, lacking an alternative location, slept on the kitchen table. Illicit roulette parties were held there, organized by Bacon with assistance by Hall, to the financial benefit of both. Sir John Everett Millais Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (June 8, 1829 – August 13, 1896) was a British painter and illustrator and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. ... A billiard room is a room with a billiard or pool table. ... Roulette is a casino and gambling game named after the French word meaning small wheel. In the game a croupier spins a wheel in one direction, then spins a ball in the opposite direction around a tilted circular surface running around the circumference of the wheel. ...


Now home to the National Art Collections Fund, the Millais house is just a short walk from the Victoria and Albert Museum, holder of a National collection of paintings by John Constable, whose oil sketches were much admired by Bacon. It was also at the V&A that Bacon would first discover and study the photographs of Eadweard Muybridge. The National Art Collections Fund (the Art Fund for short) is an independent membership-based British charity. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum (often abbreviated as the V&A) in London is the worlds largest and finest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4. ... A self portrait by John Constable John Constable (11 June 1776 – 31 March 1837) was an English Romantic painter. ... Muybridges The Horse in Motion. ...


The April 1945 show Recent Paintings by Francis Bacon, Frances Hodgkins, Matthew Smith, Henry Moore and Graham Sutherland at the Lefevre gallery (then on New Bond Street, London) had two paintings by Bacon - Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) and Figure in a landscape (1945). Sir Matthew Smith (1879 - 1959) was an English painter. ... Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London. ... Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion is a 1944 triptych painted by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ...


Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion

Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) is a key precursor to Bacon's later themes: the triptych format, the placement behind glass in heavily gilded frames, the open mouth, and the use of painterly distortion; the Eumenides, or Furies, in the Oresteia of Aeschylus and the theme of the Crucifixion (Figures at the Foot of the Cross was the first attempt at the title).[6][7] Completed in oil paint and pastel on Sundeala fibre board within the space of two weeks,[8] Bacon considered Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) to be the true start to his oeuvre - his masterpiece in the original sense. Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) was presented to the Tate Gallery by Eric Hall in 1953. Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion is a 1944 triptych painted by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... Image File history File links Three_Studies_for_Figures_at_the_Base_of_a_Crucifixion. ... Image File history File links Three_Studies_for_Figures_at_the_Base_of_a_Crucifixion. ... Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion is a 1944 triptych painted by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... The Raising of the Cross, Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal, Antwerp A triptych (from the Greek tri- three + ptychē fold) is a work of art (usually a panel painting) which is divided into three sections, or three carved panels which are hinged together. ... A gilded Tibetan Vajrasattva Gilding is the art of applying metal leaf (most commonly gold or silver leaf) to a surface. ... For other uses, see Mouth (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Distortion (disambiguation). ... Two Furies, from an ancient vase. ... The Oresteia is a trilogy of tragedies about the end of the curse on the House of Atreus, written by Aeschylus. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Masterpiece (disambiguation). ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ...


Untitled (1944) a variant of the right-hand panel of Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) was shown at Francis Bacon: The Human Body, curated by David Sylvester, at the Hayward Gallery in 1998.[9] A version of the left-hand panel: Study for a Figure (c.1944) was among the abandoned pictures in the 1964 catalogue raisonné. Hayward Gallery, London The Hayward Gallery is an art gallery within the South Bank Centre, situated on the South Bank of the River Thames, in central London, England. ... A catalogue raisonné is a monograph containing a complete list of an artists works, or their works produced in a particular media or time period. ...


Figure in a landscape (1945)

A photograph of Eric Hall dozing on a seat in Hyde Park was the basis of the other painting in the Lefevre show, Figure in a landscape (1945) which was bought by Diana Watson and, in 1950, by the Tate Gallery (with the support of Graham Sutherland, then a trustee (1948 – 1954)). Image File history File links Figure_in_a_Landscape_(1945). ... Image File history File links Figure_in_a_Landscape_(1945). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... “Hyde Park” redirects here. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Figure Study (1945) was destroyed; Figure Study I and Figure Study II are from 1945 or 1946. Study for Man with Microphones (1946) was shown at the Lefevre gallery, (British Painters Past and Present July - August 1946), and at the Anglo-French Art Centre, (Seventh Exhibition November – December 1946). Bacon was clearly unhappy with this picture: it was listed as an abandoned work in the 1964 catalogue raisonné, and was passed on to the Estate in 1992 as a slashed canvas. Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A catalogue raisonné is a monograph containing a complete list of an artists works, or their works produced in a particular media or time period. ...


At some point in 1947–1948, Bacon returned to make a second version, Study for Man with Microphones (1947-48) (shown February to March 1948 , at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Contemporary Painters (last (monochrome) plate in the catalogue by James Thrall Soby) as Study for Man with Microphones (1946); and from October to November 1962 in Francis Bacon at the Galleria d'Arte Galatea, Milan as Gorilla with Microphones (1945-46)). This article is about the museum in New York City. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ...


Crucifixion (1933) (oil on canvas) was shown at the Summer Exhibition (July - September 1946) at the Redfern Gallery, 19/20 Cork Street, London, and bought by Sir Colin Anderson. Cork Street is a street in the West End of London, England with a number of small commercial art galleries. ...


Painting (1946)

If Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944) is Bacon's masterpiece, then Painting (1946) has a good claim to be his Magnum opus. Originally to be a painting of a chimpanzee in long grass (parts of which may be still visible), he then attempted to portray a bird of prey landing in a field. Bacon described it as his most unconscious[10] work - the marks suddenly suggesting this image - at once magnificent and appalling. Image File history File links Painting_1946. ... Image File history File links Painting_1946. ... Painting (1946) is a 1946 painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... For other uses, see Masterpiece (disambiguation). ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... Type species Simia troglodytes Blumenbach, 1775 distribution of Species Pan troglodytes Pan paniscus Chimpanzee, often shortened to chimp, is the common name for the two extant species of apes in the genus Pan. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... Orders Accipitriformes     Cathartidae     Pandionidae     Accipitridae     Sagittariidae Falconiformes     Falconidae A bird of prey or raptor is a bird that hunts its food, especially one that preys on mammals or other birds. ...

FB:"Well, one of the pictures I did in 1946, which was the thing that's in the Museum of Modern Art…"
DS:"The butcher-shop picture."
FB:"Yes. It came to me as an accident. I was attempting to make a bird alighting on a field. And it may have been bound up in some way with the three forms that had gone before, but suddenly the line that I had drawn suggested something totally different and out of this suggestion arose this picture. I had no intention to do this picture; I never thought of it in that way. It was like one continuous accident mounting on top of another."

- Excerpt from the October 1962 interview with David Sylvester for the BBC.


Graham Sutherland saw Painting (1946) in the Cromwell Place studio, and urged his dealer, Erica Brausen, then of the Redfern Gallery, to go to see the painting and to buy it. Brausen wrote to Bacon several times, and visited his studio in early autumn 1946 and promptly bought the work for £200. (Painting (1946) was shown in several group shows including in the British section of Exposition internationale d'arte moderne (18 November - 28 December 1946) at the Musée National d'Art Moderne, for which Bacon travelled to Paris.) Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Musée National dArt Moderne is an art museum in Paris, France, located within the Centre Georges Pompidou. ...


Within a fortnight of the sale of Painting (1946) to the Hanover Gallery, with the proceeds, Bacon had decamped from London to Monte Carlo. After staying at a succession of hotels and flats, including the Hôtel de Ré, Bacon settled in a large villa, La Frontalière, in the hills above the town. Eric Hall and Nanny Lightfoot would come to stay. Bacon spent much of the next few years in Monte Carlo, short visits to London apart. From Monte Carlo, Bacon wrote to Graham Sutherland and Erica Brausen. His letters to Erica Brausen show that he did paint there, but no paintings are known to survive. Monte Carlo is a very wealthy section of the city-state of Monaco known for its casino, gambling, beaches, glamour, and sightings of famous people. ... The Albertian Villa Medici in Fiesole: terraced grounds on a sloping site. ...


In 1948, Painting (1946) finally sold to Alfred Barr for the Museum of Modern Art in New York for £240. Bacon wrote to Sutherland asking that he apply fixative to the patches of pastel on Painting (1946) before it was shipped to New York. Painting (1946) is now too fragile to be moved from MoMA for exhibition elsewhere. Alfred H. Barr, Jr. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A fixative is a liquid, similar to varnish, which is usually sprayed over a finished piece of artwork to better preserve it and prevent smudging. ... Pastel is an art medium in the form of a stick, consisting of pure powdered pigment and a binder. ...


Head I, Head II - Head VI

Head I (1948)
Head I (1948)

Bacon returned to London and Cromwell Place to paint, late in 1948. Head I was shown at the Summer Exhibition at the Redfern gallery from July to September 1948. By the end of 1948 Erica Brausen, who had advanced Bacon money for works, left the Redfern Gallery. Brausen had found private capital to start her own gallery in Mayfair. In the spring, a Bacon painting, presumably Head I, was shown at Erica Brausen's new Hanover Gallery (and was noted by Wyndham Lewis in an exhibition review of 12 May 1949). Held between November 8 and December 10 1949 at the Hanover Gallery, Francis Bacon: Paintings; Robert Ironside: Coloured Drawings, was in effect, his first professional one-man show (Robert Ironside's watercolors were on an upper floor). A series of six paintings Head I to Head VI, with Study from the Human Body (1949) and Study for Portrait (1949) formed the core of the show with four other paintings by Bacon. Image File history File links Head_(1948). ... Image File history File links Head_(1948). ... This article is about the Vorticist painter and author. ...


Bacon's paintings attracted the support of Wyndham Lewis writing in The Spectator: "Head I differs from Head II - Head VI in one important respect: while the first is painted on hardboard and dates from 1948 (or 1947-8), the rest of the series date from 1949 and are painted on the reverse of a (commercially) primed canvas." Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... A type of manufactured sheet material akin to particle board, but much harder and denser because it is made out of exploded wood fibers. ... Look up Canvas in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

"Well, I was living once down in Monte Carlo and I had lost all my money, and, I had no canvases left and so, the few I had I just turned them, and I found that the, that the, what is called the wrong side, the unprimed side of the canvas worked for me very much better. So I've always used them. So it was just by chance that I had no money to buy canvases with."

- Excerpt from an interview with Melvyn Bragg in Francis Bacon (1985), for the 'South Bank Show' for London Weekend Television. The South Bank Show is a British television arts magazine show, presented by Melvyn Bragg and seen in over 60 countries — including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA. Its stated aim is to bring both high art and popular culture to a mass audience. ...


Head II is, for Bacon, very thickly painted, this was one of very few instances when he had been able to 'rescue' a painting after it had become overworked and the weave of the canvas clogged[11] (as happened with two abandoned works on canvas from the Head series, from 1949, also in the 1949 Hanover show). The arrow, or pointer, motif in Head II is taken from the book Positioning in Radiography by Kathleen Clara Clark, 1939. In art, a motif is a repeated idea, pattern, image, or theme. ... A radiograph of a right elbow-joint Radiography is the use of certain types of electromagnetic radiation—usually ionizing—to view objects. ...

Head VI (1948) (Arts Council of England)
Head VI (1948) (Arts Council of England)

Head VI was Bacon's first surviving engagement with Velázquez's great Portrait of Pope Innocent X (three 'popes' were painted in Monte Carlo in 1946 but were destroyed). The Cobalt Violet mozzetta, crimson in Velázquez's painting, may reflect Bacon's use of printed reproductions of the painting. Bacon later said that, although he admired "the magnificent color" of the Velázquez, Velázquez "wanted to make it as much like a Titian as possible but, in a curious way he cooled Titian". ImageMetadata File history File links Head_VI_(1949). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Head_VI_(1949). ... The Arts Council of England was formed in 1994 when the Arts Council of Great Britain was divided into three separate bodies for England, Scotland and Wales. ... For others named Velázquez, see Velazquez (disambiguation). ... Pope Innocent X (May 6, 1574 – January 7, 1655), born Giovanni Battista Pamphilj (or Pamphili), was Pope from 1644 to 1655[1]. Born in Rome of a family from Gubbio in Umbria who had come to Rome during the pontificate of Pope Innocent IX, he graduated from the Collegio Romano... Look up mozzetta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Titian (disambiguation). ...


An article by Robert Melville titled Francis Bacon appeared in the December 1949 – January 1950 issue of Horizon magazine (edited by Cyril Connolly). Melville placed Bacon in the context of European painting and film, comparing and contrasting his work with that of Picasso, Duchamp, Eisenstein and, in particular, Salvador Dalí and Buñuel's Un Chien Andalou. The piece, along with Reproductions of Paintings by Francis Bacon, was printed between a short story by James Lord and an essay on the Marquis de Sade by Maurice Blanchot). Robert Melville (December 31, 1905 - March 1986) was an English art critic and journalist. ... Cyril Vernon Connolly (10 September 1903 - 26 November 1974) was an English intellectual. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Picasso redirects here. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the... Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (Russian: Сергей Михайлович Эйзенштейн) (January 23, 1898 – February 11, 1948) was a revolutionary Soviet Russian film director and film theorist noted in particular for his silent films Strike, Battleship Potemkin and Oktober. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Un Chien Andalou (English: An Andalusian Dog) is a 16-minute[1] surrealist film made in France in 1928 by Spanish writer/directors Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, and released in 1929 in Paris. ... Donatien Alphonse François de Sade (Marquis de Sade) (June 2, 1740 – December 2, 1814) (pronounced IPA: ) was a French aristocrat, french revolutionary and writer of philosophy-laden and often violent pornography. ... Maurice Blanchot (September 27, 1907-February 20, 2003) was a French philosopher, literary theorist and writer of fiction. ...


The Colony Room

The Colony Room is a private drinking club at 41 Dean Street, Soho, also known as Muriel's after Muriel Belcher, the formidable proprietor. Belcher, who had run a club called the Music-box in Leicester Square during the war, had secured a 3pm - 11pm drinking licence for the Colony Room bar as a private-members club (public houses had¨to, by law, close at 2:30pm). Bacon was a founding member, and joined the day after its opening in 1948. He was 'adopted' by Belcher as a 'daughter', and was allowed free drinks and £10 a week to bring in friends and rich patrons. It was here that Bacon became friends with Lady Rose McLaren. Muriel Belcher was the founder and proprietress of a drinking club known as the Colony Room (also known as Muriels) at 41 Dean Street, Soho, London. ... Muriel Belcher was the founder and proprietoress of a drinking club known as the Colony Room (also known as Muriels) at 41 Dean Street, Soho, London. ... Leicester Square at night in 2005: a view towards the northeast corner. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Pub redirects here. ... Lady Rose Mary Primrose McLaren (27 July 1919 – 1 November 2005) (née Paget the daughter of the 6th Marquess of Anglesey) The Paget family (the Marquesses of Anglesey), who lived at Plas Newydd and Beaudesert in Staffordshire were a close-knit family particularly noted for the beauty of its...


Bacon met the painter and illustrator John Minton in 1948. Minton was soon to become a regular at 'Muriel's, as were the painters Lucian Freud, Frank Auerbach, Timothy Behrens, Michael Andrews, the two Roberts, Colquhoun and MacBride, and above all the sometime Vogue photographer, John Deakin. In 1950, Bacon met the art critic David Sylvester, then best known for his writing on Henry Moore and praise for Alberto Giacometti's work. Sylvester had admired and written about his work (first writing about Bacon for a French periodical, L'Age nouveau, in 1948) but had erroneously perceived it to be a form of Expressionism. Head I, in particular, at the 1949 Hanover Gallery show, was, for Sylvester, proof of Bacon's importance as a painter. John Minton left for the West Indies in September 1950. Aware that Bacon was in need of money, Minton asked him to take over his post as a tutor at the school of painting at the Royal College of Art. On condition that he did no formal teaching, Bacon agreed. So for three months, he was on hand to talk to the students for two days a week. Francis John Minton (25 December 1917–20 January 1957) was a British painter and illustrator of landscapes, portraits, and figures, as well as a theatrical designer. ... Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH (born 8 December 1922) is a British painter and printmaker. ... Frank Helmut Auerbach (born April 29, 1931) is a jewish painter. ... Michael Andrews (30 October 1928 – 19 July 1995) studied at the Slade School of Fine Art under William Coldstream and briefly in Italy. ... For other meanings, see vogue. ... John Deakin c. ... Anthony David Bernard Sylvester CBE, (21 September 1924; London – 19 June 2001; London) was a British art critic and curator. ... This article is about the sculptor Henry Moore. ... Photograph of Alberto Giacometti by Henri Cartier-Bresson Woman with Her Throat Cut, a floor sculpture by Alberto Giacometti, 1932 (cast 1949), Museum of Modern Art, (New York City) Three Men Walking II, by Alberto Giacometti, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1949 Alberto Giacometti (October 10, 1901 – January 11, 1966) was... The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists Portrait of Eduard Kosmack by Egon Schiele Rehe im Walde by Franz Marc Elbe Bridge I by Rolf Nesch On White II by Wassily Kandinsky, 1923. ... The Darwin Building at Kensington Gore The Royal College of Art (RCA) is a university in London, England. ...


Painting (1950) and Fragment of a Crucifixion (1950) were among the works shown at Francis Bacon: Recent Paintings; Hilly: Paintings, at the Hanover gallery, 14 September - 21 October 1950. Also Study for Figure (1950) (destroyed) and Man at a Curtain (1949) - an abandoned work. is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Study after Velázquez

Figure in Frame (1950)

This series of three paintings after Velázquez were painted for the September 1950 Hanover gallery exhibition. The exhibition was advertised as Francis Bacon: Three Studies from the Painting of Innocent X by Velázquez but the series was withdrawn before the start of the show by Bacon. In November 1950, after Bacon had gone off to South Africa, the Hanover gallery offered on his behalf Study after Velázquez (1950) to the Arts Council, for the Festival of Britain show Sixty Paintings for '51. On his return in May, Bacon again withdrew the painting before it was shown, although it is in the catalogue to the exhibition. Study after Velázquez (1950) and Study after Velázquez II (1950) were sent to his art supplier for the frames and stretchers to be reused. Bacon apparently believed them destroyed. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x663, 63 KB)Francis Bacon Figure in Frame (1950) This image is of a drawing, painting, print, or other two-dimensional work of art, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the artist who produced the image... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (450x663, 63 KB)Francis Bacon Figure in Frame (1950) This image is of a drawing, painting, print, or other two-dimensional work of art, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the artist who produced the image... The Arts Council of Great Britain was a Quango dedicated to the promotion of the fine arts in Britain. ... The Festival of Britain emblem, designed by Abram Games, from the cover of the South Bank Exhibition Guide, 1951 The Festival of Britain was a national exhibition which opened in London and around Britain in May 1951. ...


Study after Velázquez (1950) and Study after Velázquez II (1950) were rediscovered carefully rolled-up at Bacon's art supplier in September 1998 (and shown at the Tony Shafrazi gallery). Study after Velázquez II (1950) (also known as Untitled (Pope) (1950)) is an abandoned work. Study after Velázquez III (1950) is destroyed (but was photographed). In January 1951 Bacon was featured in World Review in The Iconoclasm of Francis Bacon by Robert Melville (describing Study after Velázquez (1950) seen at the studio and on the destruction of the three paintings in the series of studies after Velázquez; Fragment of a Crucifixion (1950) and Man at a Curtain (1949) are shown in monochrome).


Study for Nude Figures (1950) (also known as Untitled (Crouching Figure) (1950)), and Figure in Frame (1950) (also known as Untitled (figure) (1950-1)), were among the abandoned paintings found in storage after the painter's death. Figure in Frame (1950), in particular, is a compellingly beautiful wreck, with thin dry-brushed paint on raw linen over a spectral smear and scrapes of oil paint.


By 1950, Bacon's affair with Eric Hall had come to an end - he no longer appears on the electoral register with Bacon and Jessie Lightfoot at 7 Cromwell Place - but he was to remain a loyal patron, friend and supporter. During November 1950, Bacon visited his mother in South Africa. This suited his asthma better than spending winter in London. Bacon was impressed by the African landscapes and wildlife, and took photographs in Kruger National Park. On his return journey he spent a few days in Cairo, and wrote to Erica Brausen of his intent to visit Karnak and Luxor, and then go via Alexandria to Marseilles. The visit confirmed his belief in the supremacy of Egyptian art, embodied by the Sphinx. He returned in the Spring of 1951. Kruger National Park is the largest game reserve in South Africa. ... For other uses, see Cairo (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Karnak temple complex in Egypt. ... Luxor on Nile, at Luxor Temple with mosque. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... Marseilles redirects here. ... The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt The Great Sphinx of Giza (Arabic: أبو الهول The Father of Fear) is a half-human, half-lion Sphinx statue in Egypt, on the Giza Plateau at the west bank of the Nile River, near modern-day Cairo. ...


On 30 April 1951 Jessie Lightfoot, Bacon's old nurse, died at Cromwell Place. Bacon was gambling in Nice when he learnt of her death. Lightfoot was Bacon's closest companion and had joined him in London on his return from Paris, and had lived with him and Eric Alden at Queensberry Mews West, and with him and Eric Hall at the cottage near Petersfield, in Monte Carlo and at Cromwell Place. Stricken Bacon sold the 7 Cromwell Place apartment. Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the French city. ...


After 7 Cromwell Place 1951 - 1953

Bacon took a place in Carlyle Studios Chelsea near the King's Road and, for a time, Bacon worked at the Royal College of Art, in a studio lent by Rodrigo Moynihan. Head (1951), Figure with Monkey (1951), Study for Nude (1951), Portrait of Lucian Freud (1951), and a series of three popes Pope I (1951), Pope II (1951) and Pope III (1951) were shown at Francis Bacon at the Hanover gallery December 1951 - February 1952. Study for Nude (1951), which relates in form to Study for Nude Figures (1950), is one of very few paintings by Bacon for which a sketch for the composition survives (in Chinese ink over a photograph in a 1920s Naturist book Man and Sunlight by Hans Surén). Portrait of Lucian Freud (1951) is based on a photograph of Kafka printed as the frontispiece to Max Brod's Franz Kafka: eine Biographie Prague: 1937. The Kings Road is a major, well-known street in London, England. ... The Darwin Building at Kensington Gore The Royal College of Art (RCA) is a university in London, England. ... Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH (born 8 December 1922) is a British painter and printmaker. ... Naturists find going without clothing both enjoyable and relaxing. ... Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH (born 8 December 1922) is a British painter and printmaker. ... Franz Kafka approximately 1917 Franz Kafka (July 3, 1883 in Prague - June 3, 1924 in Vienna) was one of the major German language writers of the 20th century most of whose work was published posthumously. ...


Pope II (1951) was actually painted first in the 1951 series of three popes (P. II, P. I, P. III) based not so much on Velázquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X, but on a photograph of Pope Pius XII being carried on a sedia gestatoria through a fan vaulted room in the Vatican. (The series was hung as a triptych at the 1962 Tate retrospective.) The January 1952 Magazine of Art article by Sam Hunter: Francis Bacon: The Anatomy of Horror, places Bacon in a British context, of Sutherland, Wyndham Lewis and Sickert (and even, in passing, Aubrey Beardsley). The article also reproduced two photographs Hunter had taken, in the Summer of 1950, of Bacon's photographic source material; Hunter had found the tables of the 7 Cromwell Place studio littered with newspaper clippings, magazine illustrations and reproductions torn from art books, he had arranged them to put the most images in frame and photographed them in situ. Pius XIIs signature Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the human head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death in 1958. ... Error creating thumbnail: convert: unable to open image `/mnt/upload3/wikipedia/en/2/26/A022ht_5_SedeGest. ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... Graham Vivian Sutherland (August 24, 1903 – February 17, 1980) was an English artist. ... This article is about the Vorticist painter and author. ... Walter Sickert Walter Richard Sickert (May 31, 1860 in Munich (Germany) – January 22, 1942) was an English impressionist painter. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872 – March 16, 1898) was an influential English illustrator, and author, best known for his erotic illustrations. ...


Later life

Main article: Triptych, May-June 1973

In 1964, Bacon began a relationship with 39-year-old Eastender George Dyer, whom he met, he claimed, while the latter was burgling his apartment. A petty criminal with a history of borstal and prison, Dyer was a somewhat tortured individual, insecure, alcoholic, appearance obsessed and never really fitting in within the bohemian set surrounding Francis. The relationship was stormy and in 1971, on the eve of Bacon's major retrospective at the Paris Grand Palais, Dyer committed suicide in the hotel room they were sharing, overdosing on barbiturates. The event was recorded in Bacon's 1973 masterpiece Triptych, May-June 1973. In 1974, Bacon met John Edwards, a young, illiterate, Eastender with whom he formed one of his most enduring friendships. Triptych, May-June 1973 is a 1973 painting by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... In the United Kingdom, a borstal was a juvenile detention centre or reformatory, an institution of the criminal justice system, intended to reform delinquent male youths aged between about 16 and 21. ... Grand Palais in 2004 The Grand Palais (Grand Palace) is a large glass exhibition hall that was built for the Paris Exhibition of 1900. ... Barbituric acid, the basic structure of all barbiturates Barbiturates are drugs that act as central nervous system depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... Triptych, May-June 1973 is a 1973 painting by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ...


Bacon died of a heart attack on April 28, 1992, in Madrid, Spain. He bequeathed his entire estate (then valued at £11 million) to John Edwards. Edwards, in turn, donated the contents of Francis Bacon's chaotic studio at 7 Reece Mews, South Kensington, to the Hugh Lane gallery in Dublin. Bacon's studio contents were moved and the studio carefully reconstructed in the gallery. Additionally draft materials, perhaps intended for destruction, were according to Canadian Barry Joule bequeathed to Joule who later forwarded most of the materials to create the Barry Joule Archive in Dublin with other parts of the collection given later to the Tate museum. is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... The junction with Old Brompton Road and Pelham Street, outside South Kensington tube station. ... REDIRECT Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Bacon's Soho life was portrayed by John Maybury, with Derek Jacobi as Bacon and Daniel Craig as George Dyer (and with Tilda Swinton as Muriel Belcher), in the film Love is the Devil (1998), based on Daniel Farson's 1993 biography The Gilded Gutter Life of Francis Bacon. British director of Love is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998) with Derek Jacobi and Daniel Craig and The Jacket (2005) with Adrien Brody and Keira Knightley. ... Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... Daniel Wroughton Craig[1] (born 2 March 1968) is an English actor. ... Katherine Matilda Tilda Swinton (born November 5, 1960) is an Academy Award-, BAFTA-, BAFTA Scotland-, and Coppa Volpi-winning British actress known for both arthouse and mainstream films. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Daniel Farson (1927-1997) was a British writer and broadcaster who, although relatively obscure in his later life, was a highly prominent public figure in the late 1950s and early 1960s. ...


Record sales of work

On May 14, 2008, the Triptych, 1976, “a landmark of the 20th-century canon,” sold at Sotheby's contemporary art sale for €55,465 million ($86.28 million), a record for the artist at auction. Sold by the Moueix family, producers of Château Pétrus wines,[12] it was bought by the Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich.[13] The sale broke the 2007 record for his work of €34,212 million ($52.68 million). The triptych had remained in the same European collection since its 1977 purchase from a London gallery.[14] is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pétrus is a wine of the Pomerol wine region in Bordeaux. ... Roman Arkadyevich Abramovich (IPA: ; Russian: ; born on 24 October 1966 in Saratov, Russian SFSR, USSR) is a Russian billionaire and the main owner of private investment company Millhouse Capital, referred to as one of the Russian oligarchs. ...


Notes

  1. ^ 'I was told by a homosexual friend of Francis's that he'd once admitted that his father, the dreaded and failed horse trainer, had arranged that his small son spend his childhood being systematically and viciously horsewhipped by his Irish grooms.' - Caroline Blackwood in Francis Bacon (1909–1992) for The New York Review of Books Volume 39, Number 15 · September 24, 1992.
  2. ^ "I'm not sure Francis had a lot in common with my mother because, she didn't take much notice of his art or anything. I remember sometimes he brought home things that he'd drawn and, I don't know what my mother did with them she wasn't wildly interested in it. They were always, what we used to call 1920s ladies you know, with the cloche hat and, cigarette holder [gestures long holder]. That sort of thing. They were always drawings like that. They were very nice. What happened to them I don't know. — And, funnily enough I actually remember them."   — Ianthe Knott (née Bacon) interviewed for Bacon's Arena dir. Adam Low (BBC Arena), broadcast 19 March 2005, at 9pm on BBC2.
  3. ^ "I went to Berlin. I wasn't in Berlin very long, but I did see Berlin about 1927–28, which was, one of the, what is called, the great [decadent years, they say, of Berlin. And I went with a, somebody, who had picked me up, whatever you like to say, and we went and stayed at the Hotel Adlon, which is the most wonderful hotel, because I always remember, the wheeling the breakfast in the morning, with these wonderful trollies with enormous swans necks coming out of the four corners. And then, the night life of Berlin at that time, to go down the Kurfürstendamm and that kind of thing was really very exciting in those times because I had never seen anything from coming from a very puritanical country, in a way, like Ireland, going to a city which at that time was wide open, was very exciting for me." — from an interview with David Sylvester (March 1984) in Francis Bacon: The Brutality of Fact dir. Michael Blackwood, for the BBC, broadcast 16 November 1984 (used in interview 9, Interviews with Francis Bacon David Sylvester).
  4. ^ "The replies used to pour in, and my old nanny used to go through them all and pick out the best ones. I must say she was always right. There was one time I found myself being taken back to Paris by this dreadful old thing who took a very expensive flat just off the Champs-Élysées, on the rue 1er de Serbie. I didn't stay with him long, as you might imagine! But what was amazing was how easily you were able to pick up people in that way." — quoted in Peppiatt p.55.
  5. ^ "Another thing that made me think about the human cry was a book I bought when I was very young from a bookshop in Paris, a second-hand book with beautiful hand-colored plates of diseases of the mouth, beautiful plates of the mouth open and of the examination of the inside of the mouth; and they fascinated me, and I was obsessed by them. And then I saw — or perhaps I even knew by then — the Potemkin film, and I attempted to use the Potemkin still as a basis on which I could also use these marvelous illustrations of the human mouth. It never worked out though." — from interview 2, (May 1966) (Interviews with Francis Bacon David Sylvester)
  6. ^ Nochlin, Linda. "Francis Bacon". Artforum International, October 1996.
  7. ^ Fuller, Peter. "Francis Bacon. London." The Burlington Magazine, Vol. 127, No. 989, August 1985. pp. 552-554.
  8. ^ Sylvester (1987), p. 13
  9. ^ Gale, Matthew. "Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, circa 1944". Tate Gallery Online, November 1998. Retrieved on 7 April 2007.
  10. ^ "La distinction aujourd'hui classique entre conscient et inconscient est très féconde, me semble-t-il. Elle ne recouvre pas tout à fait ce à quoi je pense par rapport à la peinture, mais elle a l'avantage de ne pas recourir à une explication métaphysique pour parler de ce qui échappe à la compréhension logique des choses. L'inconnu n'est pas renvoyé du côté de la mystique ou de quelque chose comme ça. Et c'est très important pour moi, parce que j'ai horreur de toute explication de cet ordre." ("The classic distinction today between the conscious and the unconscious is a useful one I think. It doesn't quite cover what I think about painting, but it has the advantage of not having to resort to a metaphysical explanation to talk about what cannot be explained in rational terms. The unknown is not relegated to the realm of the mystical or something similar. And that's very important to me because I loathe all explanations of that sort.") – Francis Bacon Entretiens avec Michel Archimbaud, 1992 (Francis Bacon in conversation with Michel Archimbaud)
  11. ^ DS:Have you managed to paint any pictures in which you did go on and on and the paint got thick and you still pulled them through? || FB:I have, yes. There was an early one of a head against curtains. It was a small picture, and very, very thick. I worked on that for about four months, and in some curious way it did, I think, perhaps, come through a bit.
  12. ^ Vogel, Carol, The New York Times (May 14, 2008). Bacon Painting Auctioned for Record $86 Million.
  13. ^ Burns, Ciar, The Independent (May 19, 2008). Roman's empire: where Abramovich spends his billions.
  14. ^ Michaud, Christopher, Reuters.com (May 15, 2008). Bacon painting sets postwar auction record.

This article is about the literary magazine. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Arena is a British television documentary series, which has run in occasional seasons on the BBC TWO network since 1978. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... The Kurfürstendamm, Berlins upscale retail neighbourhood The Kurfürstendamm is one of the most famous avenues in Berlin, Germany. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  ) is the most prestigious and broadest avenue in Paris. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Further reading

  • Archimbaud, Michel (1994) Francis Bacon: The Final Vision New York: Phaidon Press ISBN 0-7148-2983-8
  • Baldassari, Anne (2005) Bacon-Picasso: The Life of Images London: Flammarion ISBN 2-08-030486-0
  • Brighton, Andrew (2001) Francis Bacon London: Tate Publishing Ltd ISBN 1-85437-307-2
  • Cappock, Margarita (2005) Francis Bacon's Studio London: Merrell Publishers Ltd ISBN 1-85894-276-4
  • Deleuze, Gilles (2004) Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation London: Continuum International Publishing Group - Mansell ISBN 0-8264-7318-0
  • Domino, Christophe (1997) Francis Bacon London: Thames and Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-30076-3
  • Edwards, John (2001) 7 Reece Mews: Francis Bacon's Studio London: Thames & Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-51034-2
  • Farson, Daniel (1994) The Gilded Gutter Life of Francis Bacon London: Vintage ISBN 0-09-930781-2
  • Gale, Matthew; Sylvester David (1999) Francis Bacon: Working on Paper London: Tate Publishing Ltd ISBN 1-85437-280-7
  • Hammer, Martin (2005) Bacon and Sutherland Boston: Yale University Press ISBN 0-300-10796-X
  • Hammer, Martin (2005) Francis Bacon: Portraits and Heads Edinburgh: National Galleries of Scotland ISBN 1-903278-66-X
  • Harrison, Martin (March 2005) In Camera, Francis Bacon: Photography, Film and the Practice of Painting London: Thames & Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-23820-0
  • Hunter, Sam; Peppiatt, Michael; Sylvester, David (1998) Francis Bacon: Important Paintings from the Estate New York: Tony Shafrazi gallery ISBN 1-891475-16-9
  • Kundera, Milan; Borel, France (1996) Bacon: Portraits and Self-portraits London: Thames & Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-09266-4
  • Peppiatt, Michael (1996) Francis Bacon: Anatomy of an Enigma London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson ISBN 0-297-81616-0
  • Peppiatt, Michael (2006) Francis Bacon in the 1950s London: Yale University Press ISBN 0-300-12192-X
  • Rothenstein, John (introduction); Alley, Ronald (Catalogue raisonnè and documentation) (1964) Francis Bacon London: Thames and Hudson Ltd
  • Russell, John (1993) Francis Bacon London: Thames and Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-20271-0
  • Schmied, Wieland (2006) Francis Bacon: Commitment and Conflict London: Prestel Verlag ISBN 3-7913-3472-7
  • Sinclair, Andrew Francis (1994) Bacon: His Life and Violent Times. London, Sinclair Stevenson, 1993; New York, Crown
  • Steffen, Barbara; Bryson, Norman (2004) Francis Bacon and the Tradition of Art Zurich: Skira Editore ISBN 88-8491-721-2
  • Sylvester, David (1975, 1980, 1987) Interviews with Francis Bacon (revised edition 1993) London: Thames & Hudson ISBN 0-500-27475-4
  • Sylvester, David (2000) Looking Back at Francis Bacon London: Thames & Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-01994-0
  • Sylvester, David (1998) Francis Bacon: The Human Body London: Hayward Gallery ISBN 1-85332-175-3
  • Sylvester, David (1996, 1997, 2002) About Modern Art: Critical Essays 1948-2000 revised edition, London: Pimlico ISBN 0-7126-0563-0
  • Todoli, Vincente (2003) Francis Bacon: Caged. Uncaged. Lisbon: Fundacao De Serralves ISBN 972-739-109-5
  • Van Alphen, Ernst (1992) Francis Bacon and the Loss of Self London: Reaktion Books ISBN 0-948462-34-5
  • Zweite, Armin (2006) Francis Bacon: The Violence of the Real London: Thames and Hudson Ltd ISBN 0-500-09335-0

External links

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Francis Bacon (painter)

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Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion is a 1944 triptych painted by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Painting (1946) is a 1946 painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... Study after Velázquezs Portrait of Pope Innocent X , 1953 is a painting by the Irish born artist Francis Bacon. ... Figure with Meat (1954) is a painting by Francis Bacon. ... Triptych, May-June 1973 is a 1973 painting by the Irish-born artist Francis Bacon. ... Museo Rufino Tamayo is an art museum in the city of Oaxaca, Oaxaca in south west Mexico. ... The Honolulu Academy of Arts is a fine art museum located near downtown Honolulu, Hawaii. ...

Sites

  • Francis Bacon Image Gallery Extensive site with biography, images, and quotes
  • The Francis Bacon Estate
  • Tate Collection
  • Tribute and 35 great links! Biography, images, audio interviews, poetry & film.
  • ArtQuotes.net Bacon Quotes Collection of art quotes and profile of the artist
  • Francis Bacon gallery at MuseumSyndicate

News and reviews

Persondata
NAME Bacon, Francis
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Painter
DATE OF BIRTH 28 October 1909
PLACE OF BIRTH Dublin, Ireland
DATE OF DEATH 28 April 1992
PLACE OF DEATH Madrid, Spain
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