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Encyclopedia > François Ravaillac
François Ravaillac

François Ravaillac (1578May 27, 1610) was the killer of Henry IV of France. In the public domain by age This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... In the public domain by age This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Events January 31 - Battle of Gemblours - Spanish forces under Don John of Austria and Alexander Farnese defeat the Dutch. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Henry IV (French: Henri IV) (December 13, 1553 – May 14, 1610), called the Great (French: le Grand), was the first of the Bourbon kings of France, reigning from 1589 until 1610. ...


He was born at Touvre, near Angoulême. He was of undistinguished origins and began life as a servant, but later became a school teacher. Angoulême is a town in southwestern France, préfecture ( capital city) of the Charente département. ...


Highly religious, he sought admission to the Feuillants order, but after a short probation he was dismissed as he was prey to visions. An application for admission to the Society of Jesus was unsuccessful in 1606. The Society of Jesus — also known by its Latin name Societas Iesu or its English variant Jesuit Order — is a Christian religious order of the Roman Catholic Church in direct service to the Pope. ...


In 1609 he had a vision telling him to convince Henry to convert the Huguenots. Unable to meet with the king he interpreted the king's decision to invade the Netherlands as the start of a war against the Pope. Determined to stop the king he decided to kill him. He carried out the act on May 14, 1610, stabbing the king to death on the Rue de la Ferronnerie in Paris (now south of the Forum des Halles). He was immediately seized and taken to the Hôtel de Retz, to avoid a mob lynching, before being transferred to the Conciergerie. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (135th in leap years). ... Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... Les Halles is an area of Paris, France, located in the 1er arrondissement. ... The Palais de Justice, the Conciergerie and the Tour de lHorloge, after 1858 - by Adrien Dauzats The Conciergerie is a former prison in Paris, located on the west of the Île de la Cité, near the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. ...


In the course of his trial he was frequently put to the torture, but denied that he had been prompted by any one or had any accomplices. On May 27 he was taken to the Place de Grève and there was tortured before being dispatched by being pulled apart by four horses. Alistair Horne describes his torture: "Before being drawn and quartered, . . . he was scalded with burning sulphur, molten lead and boiling oil and resin, his flesh then being torn by pincers." His parents were forced into exile and the rest of his family was ordered to never use the name Ravaillac. May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... The Place de Grève was, before 1803, the name of the plaza now the City Hall Plaza (place de lHôtel de Ville) in Paris, France. ... Sir Alistair Allan Horne (November 9, 1925-) is a British historian of modern France, known for books including one on the Paris Commune. ... Drawing and quartering was part of the penalty anciently ordained in England for treason. ...


See also

  • Robert-François Damiens, another regicide; description of the regicides' method of execution

 
 

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