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Encyclopedia > François Rabelais

François Rabelais (ca. 1493 - April 9, 1553) was a Renaissance writer, born in Chinon, Indre-et-Loire, France. Events January 4 - Christopher Columbus leaves the New World. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance -French Renaissance -German Renaissance -English Renaissance The Renaissance was an influential cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. ... Chinon is a town and commune of the Indre-et-Loire département in France. ... Indre-et-Loire is a département in west-central France named after the Indre and the Loire rivers. ...

Contents

Public domain image from http://www. ...

Life

Rabelais was first a novice of the Franciscan order, and later a friar at Fontenay-le-Comte, where he studied Greek and Latin, as well as science, philology, and law, already becoming known and respected by the humanists of his era, including Budé. Harassed due to the directions of his studies, Rabelais petitioned Pope Clement VII and was granted permission to leave the Franciscans and enter the Benedictine order at Maillezais, where he was more warmly received. The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Fontenay-le-Comte is a commune of western France. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Humanism is a general term for many different lines of thought which focus on common solutions to common human issues. ... Guillaume Budé (Latin: Guglielmus Budaeus) (1467 - August 23, 1540) was a French scholar. ... For the antipope (1378-1394) see Antipope Clement VII. Pope Clement VII Clement VII, né Giulio di Giuliano de Medici (1478 – September 25, 1534) was pope from 1523 to 1534. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of Saint Benedict, whether belonging to the Roman Catholic Church, or to one of the Anglican or Protestant churches. ...


Later he left the monastery to study at the University of Poitiers and University of Montpellier. In 1532 he moved to Lyon, one of the intellectual centres of France, and not only practiced medicine, but edited Latin works for the printer Sebastian Gryphius. As a doctor, he used his spare time to write and publish humorous pamphlets which were critical of established authority and stressed his own perception of individual liberty. His revolutionary works, although satirical, revealed an astute observer of the social and political events unfolding during the first half of the sixteenth century. University of Poitiers is a university located in Poitiers, France, founded in 1431 by Pope Eugenius IV and chartered by King Charles VII of France. ... The University of Montpellier, France, is considerably older than its formal founding date, associated with a bull issued by Pope Nicholas IV in 1289, combining all the long-existing schools into a university. ... Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... City motto: Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. ...


Using a pseudonym, in 1532 he published his first book, Pantagruel, that would be the start of his Gargantua series (see Gargantua and Pantagruel). In his book, Rabelais sang the praises of the wines from his hometown of Chinon through vivid descriptions of the eat, drink and be merry lifestyle. Despite the great popularity of his book, both it and his follow-up book were condemned by the academics at the Sorbonne for their unorthodox ideas and by the Roman Catholic Church for its derision of certain religious practices. Rabelais's third book, published under his own name, was also banned. Events May 16 - Sir Thomas More resigns as Lord Chancellor of England. ... Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five books written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ... Chinon is a town and commune of the Indre-et-Loire département in France. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Saint Peters Basilica in Rome. ...


With support from members of the prominent du Bellay family (esp. Jean du Bellay), Rabelais received the approval from King François I, to continue to publish his collection but after the death of the enlightened king, Rabelais was frowned upon by the academic elite and the French Parliament suspended the sale of his fourth book. Jean du Bellay (c. ... Francis I (French: François Ier) (September 12, 1494 – July 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (French: le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ...


Afterwards, Rabelais travelled frequently to Rome with du Bellay, and lived for a short time in Turin with du Bellay's brother, Guillaume, during which François I was his patron. Rabelais probably spent some time in hiding, threatened by being labeled a heretic. Only the protection of du Bellay saved Rabelais after the condemnation of his novel by the Sorbonne. Location within Italy The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin: Roma) is the capital city of Italy and of its Latium region. ... Location Region Piedmont Province Turin Area   – Total   – Water 130 km&sup2 (50 mi²) ##.# km² (#.# mi²) #.##% Population   – Total (2002)   – Density 857,433 6,596/km² Time zone CET: UTC+1 Latitude Longitude   45°04′ N 7°40′ E1. ... Heretic, meaning literally a person guilty or accused of heresy, is also often used as a title. ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ...


Rabelais later taught medicine at Montpellier in 1537 and 1538, and in 1547 became curate of Saint-Christophe-du-Jambet and of Meudon, from which he resigned before his death in Paris in 1553. Location within France Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... Meudon is a suburb of Paris in the department of Hauts-de-Seine in northern France. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


He wrote a famous one-sentence Will: "I have nothing, I owe a great deal, and the rest I leave to the poor." In the law, a will or testament is a documentary instrument by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over the testators property or family after their death. ...


Contemporary Writers on Rabelais

Rabelais attracted many modern writers and scholars. Anatole France lectured on him in Argentina. John Cowper Powys and Wyndham Lewis wrote books about Rabelais. Lucien Febvre, on of the founders of the French historical school Annales wrote a book about him. Mikhail Bakhtin derived his celebrated concept of the carnivalesque and grotesque body from the world of Rabelais' books. Anatole France (April 16, 1844 - October 12, 1924) was the pen name of French author Jacques Anatole François Thibault. ... John Cowper Powys (October 8, 1872 - June 17, 1963) was a British (English-Welsh) writer, lecturer, and philosopher. ... Wyndam Lewis in 1916 Percy Wyndham Lewis (November 18, 1882 - March 7, 1957) was a British painter and author. ... Lucien Febvre (Nancy, 1878 - Saint-Amour, Jura, 1956) was a French historian best known for the role he played in establishing the Annales School of history. ... Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin (November 17, 1895 (new style)-1975), a Russian philosopher and literary scholar, wrote influential works in literary theory and literary criticism. ... For the literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin, the carnivalesque is both the description of a historical phenomenon and the name he gives to a certain literary tendency. ...


Bibliography

  • Pantagruel - 1532
  • La vie très horrifique du grand Gargantua - 1534
  • Tiers Livre - 1546
  • Quart Livre - 1552
  • Two versions of a fifth book appeared after his death but how much of this work is that of Rabelais remains unknown.

Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five books written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ... Gargantua and Pantagruel is a connected series of five books written in the 16th century by François Rabelais. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about:
François Rabelais
  • Project Gutenberg e-text of Gargantua and Pantagruel (http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=1200)
  • The Great Conversation (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/greatconversation/) Yahoo discussion group will be discussing Books I-II of Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel in the months of May and June, 2005.
  • Rabelais Student Media (http://www.rabelais.org.au/) - Student Magazine of La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

 
 

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