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Encyclopedia > Frames of reference

A frame of reference in physics is a set of axes which enable an observer to measure the aspect, position and motion of all points in a system relative to the reference frame. Two observers may choose to use different frames of reference to investigate a common system.


In essence, a frame of reference defines how an observer in that frame will observe the physics of what is going on around him.


For example, consider Alfred, who is standing on the side of a road watching a car drive past him from left to right. In his frame of reference, Alfred defines the spot where he is standing as the origin, the road as the x-axis and the direction in front of him as the positive y-axis. To him, the car moves along the x axis with some velocity v in the positive x-direction. Alfred's frame of reference is considered an inertial frame of reference because he is not accelerating (ignoring effects such as Earth's rotation).


Now consider Betsy, the person driving the car. Betsy, in choosing her frame of reference, defines her location as the origin, the direction to her right as the positive x-axis, and the direction in front of her as the positive y-axis. In this frame of reference, it is Betsy who is stationary and the world around her that is moving - for instance, as she drives past Alfred, she observes him moving with velocity v in the negative y-direction. If she is driving north, then north is the positive y-direction; if she turns east, east becomes the positive y-direction.


Now assume Candace is driving her car in the opposite direction. As she passes by him, Alfred measures her acceleration and finds it to be a in the negative x-direction. Assuming Candace's acceleration is constant, what acceleration does Betsy measure? If Betsy's velocity v is constant, she is in an inertial frame of reference, and she will find the acceleration to be the same - in her frame of reference, a in the negative y-direction. However, if she is accelerating at rate A in the negative y-direction (in other words, slowing down), she will find Candace's acceleration to be a' = a - A in the negative y-direction - a smaller value than Alfred has measured. Similarly, if she is accelerating at rate A in the positive y-direction (speeding up), she will observe Candace's acceleration as a' = a + A in the negative y-direction - a larger value than Alfred's measurement.


Frames of reference are especially important in special relativity, because when a frame of reference is moving at some significant fraction of the speed of light, then the flow of time in that frame does not necessarily apply in another reference frame. The speed of light is considered to be the only true constant between moving frames of reference.


Nomenclature and notation

When working a problem involving one or more frames of reference it is common to designate an inertial frame of reference.


An accelerated frame of reference is often delineated as being the "primed" frame, and all variables that are dependent on that frame are notated with primes, e.g. x' , y' , a' .


The vector from the origin of an inertial reference frame to the origin of an accelerated reference frame is commonly notated as R. Given a point of interest that exists in both frames, the vector from the inertial origin to the point is called r, and the vector from the accelerated origin to the point is called r'. From the geometry of the situation, we get

Taking the first and second derivatives of this, we obtain

where V and A are the velocity and acceleration of the accelerated system with respect to the inertial system and v and a are the velocity and acceleration of the point of interest with respect to the inertial frame.


These equations allow transformations between the two coordinate systems; for example, we can now write Newton's second law as

Accelerated frames of reference lead to "inertial" or "fictitious" forces such as the centrifugal force. These sort of forces are considered fictitious because they are not due to interations with other objects, but are caused by the acceleration of the system. Therefore the forces are fictional in the traditional sense, but their effects are very real and observable.


A common sort of accelerated reference frame is a frame that is both rotating and translating (an example is a frame of reference attached to a CD which is playing while the player is carried). This arrangement leads to the equation

Multiplying through by the mass m gives

where

(Coriolis force)
(centrifugal force)

Particular frames of reference in common use

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
COSMOLOGY MODELS - The Twin Paradox (518 words)
In this first case the reference frame is the one in which twin A stays at rest.
The paradox comes about because it would seem that if we took as our reference frame the frame in which twin B is at rest on the outbound leg and twin A is thus moving throughout the adventure, then twin A's clock should be slower hence the seeming contradiction.
We should realize however that in the reference frame of twin B at the start he is not moving but after the distant point passes him he has to go at much greater speed than the other twin's speed in order to catch up and hence his clock is more greatly slowed.
Frame of reference - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1423 words)
Alfred's frame of reference is considered an inertial frame of reference because he is not accelerating (ignoring effects such as Earth's rotation and gravity).
Frames of reference are especially important in special relativity, because when a frame of reference is moving at some significant fraction of the speed of light, then the flow of time in that frame does not necessarily apply in another reference frame.
An accelerated frame of reference is often delineated as being the "primed" frame, and all variables that are dependent on that frame are notated with primes, e.g.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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