FACTOID # 1: Idaho produces more milk than Iowa, Indiana and Illinois combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Framebuffer

The framebuffer is a part of RAM in a computer allocated to hold the graphics information for one frame or picture. This information typically consists of color values for every pixel (point that can be displayed) on the screen. A framebuffer is either: This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A computer is a device or machine for processing information from data according to a program — a compiled list of instructions. ... A pixel (pix, 1932 abbreviation of pictures, coined by Variety headline writers + element) is one of the many tiny dots that make up the representation of a picture in a computers memory. ...

  • Off-screen, meaning that writes to the framebuffer don't appear on the visible screen
  • On-screen, meaning that the framebuffer is directly coupled to the visible display

The frame buffer organization may be chunky or planar. In chunky or packed pixel frame buffer organization, the bits defining each pixel are grouped together. ... Something is called planar if it is made up of flat planes, or pertaining to planes. ...


See also: Linux framebuffer The Linux framebuffer (fbdev) is a graphic hardware-independent abstraction layer to show graphics on a console without relying on system-specific libraries such as svgalib or the heavy overhead of the X Window System. ...


External links

  • http://sourceforge.net/projects/linux-fbdev/ The linux framebuffer device (fbdev) driver was added to Linux to support the Macintosh display, which does not have a text mode. It was ported to x86 and is used to display a logo (often Tux) above a screen of text. (Note: Many pages link to linux-fbdev.org - which no longer exists)

aien handsome The Linux framebuffer (fbdev) is a graphic hardware-independent abstraction layer to show graphics on a console without relying on system-specific libraries such as svgalib or the heavy overhead of the X Window System. ... Tux, a cartoon penguin frequently featured sitting, is the official Linux mascot. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984. ... x86 or 80x86 is the generic name of a microprocessor architecture first developed and manufactured by Intel. ... The concepts behind Tux, the Linux mascot, were developed in email exchanges on a public mailing list. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
framebuffer: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2076 words)
The total amount of the memory required to drive the framebuffer is dependent on the resolution of the output signal, as well as the color depth and palette size.
Framebuffers differ significantly from the vector graphics displays that were common prior to the advent of the framebuffer.
Each framebuffer was connected to an RGB color output (one for red, one for green and one for blue), with a minicomputer controlling the three devices as one.
G3D: G3D::Framebuffer Class Reference (729 words)
With the Framebuffer Object extension, OpenGL gives the developer the ability to create offscreen framebuffers that can be used to render to textures of any specified format.
The Framebuffer class is used in conjunction with the RenderDevice to set a render target.
If you create a Framebuffer with a single, depth Renderbuffer attached (e.g., for shadow map rendering) it is complete in the OpenGL sense, however you will receive a completeness error because the glDrawBuffer and glReadBuffer attached to that Framebuffer have incorrect defaults.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m