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Encyclopedia > Frédéric Chopin

Frédéric-François Chopin (March 1, 1810October 17, 1849) is widely seen as the greatest of Polish composers and among the very greatest of composers for the piano, the instrument for which he wrote almost exclusively. He was born as Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin, adopting the French variant "Frédéric-François" when he left Poland for Paris at age 20, never to return. His surname is also sometimes spelled Szopen in Polish texts. He was another one of the extremely rare child prodigies, including Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Felix Mendelssohn. March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 17 is the 290th (in leap years the 291st) day of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... List of Polish composers: 19th century Frederic Chopin, (1810-1849) Stanislaw Moniuszko 20th century Mieczyslaw Karlowicz (Mieczysław Karłowicz) Karol Szymanowski, (1882-1937) Krzysztof Komeda Witold Lutoslawski (Witold Lutosławski) Andrzej Panufnik Krzysztof Penderecki, (born 1933) Henryk Górecki (Henryk Mikołaj Górecki) Zygmunt Konieczny Wojciech Kilar Zbigniew Preisner See also: List of famous... This is an alphabetical list of classical music composers sorted by eras. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... W.A. Mozart at the age of 21 W.A. Mozart at the age of 34 W.A. Mozart, as reconstructed 28 years after his death by Barbara Krafft Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) is considered one of the greatest composers of European classical music (or... Felix Mendelssohn wrote his first symphony at the young age of fifteen. ...

Frédéric-François Chopin, portrayed by Eugène Delacroix.
Contents

1.1 Formative years
1.2 Career in Paris
1.3 Chopin and George Sand
1.4 Death and funeral
Frédéric Chopin Portrait (unfinished) by Eugène Delacroix Medium: Oil on Canvas Original Size: 38 x 46 cm Location: Louvre, Paris, France The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright... Frédéric Chopin Portrait (unfinished) by Eugène Delacroix Medium: Oil on Canvas Original Size: 38 x 46 cm Location: Louvre, Paris, France The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright... Eugène Delacroix (portrait by Nadar) Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix ( April 26, 1798 - August 13, 1863) was an important painter from the French romantic period. ...

Biography

According to the artist himself and his family, Chopin was born on March 1, 1810. However, his baptismal certificate, written several weeks after his birth, lists his birthdate as February 22. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola in central Poland near Sochaczew, in the region of Mazovia, which was part of the Duchy of Warsaw. He was born to Mikołaj (Nicolas) Chopin, a Polonized Frenchman and to his Polish mother, Tekla Justyna Krzyżanowska. March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... February 22 is the 53rd day of every year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Sochaczew - a town in central Poland (52. ... Masovia (Polish: Mazowsze) is a geographical and historical region situated in central Poland with its capital in Warsaw. ... Location Official languages Polish Established church Roman Catholic Capital Warsaw Largest City Warsaw Head of state Duke of Warsaw Area about 158,000 km² Population about 3 million Existed 1807 - 1814 The Duchy of Warsaw (Polish: Księstwo Warszawskie, Latin: Ducatus Varsoviae, French: Duche de Varsovie) was a Polish state established... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ...


Formative years

The musical talent of young Chopin became apparent early on and can be compared with the childhood genius of Mozart. At the age of 7, he was already the author of two polonaises (in G minor and B-flat major), the first being published in the engraving workshop of Father Cybulski. The prodigy was featured in the Warsaw newspapers, and "little Chopin" became the attraction at receptions given in the aristocratic salons of the capital. He also began giving public charity concerts. At one concert, he is said to have been asked what he thought the audience liked best. 7-year-old Chopin replied, "My [shirt] collar." His first professional piano lessons, given to him by the violinist Wojciech Żywny (born 1756 in Bohemia), lasted from 1816 to 1822, when the teacher was no longer able to give any more help to the pupil whose skills surpassed his own. W.A. Mozart at the age of 21 W.A. Mozart at the age of 34 W.A. Mozart, as reconstructed 28 years after his death by Barbara Krafft Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) is considered one of the greatest composers of European classical music (or... The polonaise (polonez, chodzony) is a rather slow dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... Wojciech Adalbert Żywny (1756 - 1840), Polish pianist and violinist. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bohemia Historical map of Bohemia Bohemia is also a place in the State of New York in the United States of America: see Bohemia, New York. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin, taken during the degenerative stages of his tuberculosis

The further development of Chopin's talent was supervised by Wilhelm Würfel (born 1791 in Bohemia). This renowned pianist and professor at the Warsaw Conservatory gave Chopin valuable (although irregular) lessons in playing organ, and possibly piano. From 1823 to 1826, Chopin attended the Warsaw Lyceum, where his father was a professor. In the autumn of 1826, Chopin began studying music theory, figured bass, and composition with the composer Józef Elsner (born 1769 in Silesia) at the Warsaw Conservatory. In 1831 he left Poland for Vienna before settling in Paris where he spent much of his life. Download high resolution version (1144x1443, 501 KB)The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin -- source: http://www. ... Download high resolution version (1144x1443, 501 KB)The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin -- source: http://www. ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Bohemia Historical map of Bohemia Bohemia is also a place in the State of New York in the United States of America: see Bohemia, New York. ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... This article or section should be merged with Pipe organ The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal The organ is a type of keyboard musical instrument, distinctive because the sound is not produced by a percussion action, as on a piano or celesta, or by... Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of integer musical notation used to indicate intervals, chords, and nonchord tones, in relation to a bass note. ... Józef Elsner (1769 - 1854) was a Polish composer and professor of music remembered today primarily as the teacher of composer Frederic Chopin. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Silesia (Polish Śląsk, German Schlesien, Czech Slezsko) is a historical region in central Europe. ... 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


Career in Paris

Chopin first visited Vienna in early 1829, where he gave a piano performace and received his first favorable reviews. The following year he returned to Warsaw and performed the premiere of his Piano Concerto in F Minor at the National Theater on March 17. By 1831 Chopin had left Poland for good and settled in Paris. He began work on his first scherzi and ballades as well as the first book of études. It is also at this time that he began his lifelong struggle with tuberculosis. Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... 1831 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Tuberculous lungs show up on an X-ray image Tuberculosis is an infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system (meningitis), lymphatic system, circulatory system (miliary TB), genitourinary system, bones and joints. ...


The early and mid-1830s in Paris were a productive time for the composer. He completed several of his most famous works and also performed regular concerts, to rave reviews. By 1838 Chopin had become a famous figure in Paris. Among his closest friends were opera composer Vincenzo Bellini (beside whom he is buried in the Père Lachaise), and painter Eugène Delacroix. He was also friends with composers Hector Berlioz, Franz Liszt and Robert Schumann, and although he was at times critical of their music, Chopin dedicated some of his own compositions to them. 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Vincenzo Bellini Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini (November 3, 1801 – September 23, 1835) was an Italian opera composer. ... The Cimetière du Père Lachaise is the largest cemetery in Paris, and one of the most famous cemeteries in the world. ... Eugène Delacroix (portrait by Nadar) Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix ( April 26, 1798 - August 13, 1863) was an important painter from the French romantic period. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie Fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Requiem of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... Franz Liszt (Hungarian; Liszt Ferenc) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist and composer. ... Robert Schumann (June 8, 1810 – July 29, 1856) was a German composer and pianist in the Romantic period of Classical music. ...


Chopin and George Sand

In 1836 Chopin was secretly engaged to a seventeen-year-old Polish girl named Maria Wodzinska. The engagement was later called off. In that same year, at a party hosted by Countess Marie d'Agoult, mistress of fellow composer Franz Liszt, Chopin met Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Baroness Dudevant, better known by her pseudonym as George Sand. She was a French Romantic writer, noted for her numerous love affairs with such prominent figures as Prosper Merimée, Alfred de Musset (1833–34), Alexandre Manceau (1849–65), and others. 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Marie Catherine Sophie de Flavigny, Vicomtesse de Flavigny (December 31, 1805 - March 5, 1876), known also by her married name and title, Marie, Comtesse dAgoult, and by her pen name, Daniel Stern, was an author and a paramour of Franz Liszt. ... George Sand (portrait by Nadar) Amandine-Aurore-Lucile Dupin, later Baroness Dudevant (July 1, 1804 – June 8, 1876) was a French novelist and early feminist (prior to the invention of the word), writing under the pen name of George Sand. ... Prosper Mérimée Prosper Mérimée (September 28, 1803–September 23, 1870) was a French dramatist, historian, archaeologist, and short story writer. ... Alfred Louis Charles de Musset, (December 11, 1810 – May 2, 1857) was a French dramatist, poet, and novelist. ...


The composer did not first consider her attractive. "Something about her repels me," he said to his family. Their relationship ended in 1847 when Sand began to suspect that he had fallen in love with her daughter, Solange. It is also possible that behind the breakup was Sand's treatment of her daughter.


Sand's correspondence suggests that Chopin was asexual; that is, that he had no inclination to have sexual relations with anyone, male or female. Even so, his relationship with Sand lasted for ten years until they parted after arguments over Sand's children Maurice and Solange. Asexuality is a designation or self-designation for people who lack feelings of sexual attraction and/or sexual desire. ...


A notable episode in their time together was a turbulent and miserable winter on Majorca (18381839) living in unheated peasant huts and in the then-abandoned (and equally cold) Valldemossa monastery. [1] (http://www.valldemossa.com/museoin.htm) Chopin would also later complain of having to go to great lengths to obtain a piano from Paris and of the difficulty of moving it uphill to the monastery. Chopin reflected much of the mood of this desperate time in the twenty-four préludes, Op. 28, the majority of which were written in Majorca. The weather had such a serious impact on Chopin's health and his chronic lung disease that he and George Sand were compelled to return to Paris to save his life. He survived but never recovered from this bout. Majorca (Mallorca in Catalan and Spanish (sometimes also encountered in English), from Latin insula maior, later Maiorica major island) is one of the Balearic Islands (Catalan: Illes Balears, Spanish: Islas Baleares), which are located in the Mediterranean Sea and are a part of Spain. ... 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Valldemossa is a village in Majorca, Spain. ... In music, a prelude is a short piece, usually in no particular form. ...


Chopin and Sand's illustrious relationship is explored in the movie Impromptu which stars Hugh Grant as Chopin and Judy Davis as George Sand. Like the movie, Amadeus, however, it does not focus on fact as much as fiction. Impromptu is a 1991 movie starring Hugh Grant as Chopin and Judy Davis as George Sand. ... A play and film written in 1979 by Peter Shaffer, Amadeus is loosely based on the life of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. ...


Death and funeral

By the 1840s Chopin's health was rapidly deteriorating. He and Sand took several trips to remote locations, such as Nohant-Vic, to no avail. By 1849 most of his major works were completed and Chopin concentrated on mazurkas and nocturnes. His last work was a mazurka, in F minor. Nohant-Vic is a village in the Indre département of central France. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The mazurka is a Polish folk dance in triple time with a usually moderate tempo, containing a heavy accent on the third or second beat. ... A nocturne (from the French for nocturnal) is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. ...


Chopin died, officially, of tuberculosis in 1849, although there is some speculation that he may have had another disease such as cystic fibrosis or emphysema due in part to autopsy findings (reported only by his sister) seemingly inconsistent with the initial diagnosis. He had a terror of being buried alive, and asked to be "cut open" to make sure he was dead. Tuberculous lungs show up on an X-ray image Tuberculosis is an infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system (meningitis), lymphatic system, circulatory system (miliary TB), genitourinary system, bones and joints. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For the former Death Metal band called Autopsy, see Autopsy (band). ...

The grave of Chopin in Paris

He had requested that Mozart's Requiem be sung at his funeral, which was held at the Church of the Madeleine and was attended by nearly three thousand people. The Requiem has major parts for female singers but the Madeleine had never permitted female singers in its choir. The funeral was delayed for almost 2 weeks while the matter raged, the church finally relenting and granting Chopin's final wish. Although Chopin is buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris, his heart is entombed in a pillar in the Church of the Holy Cross in Warsaw. Download high resolution version (500x679, 88 KB)The grave of Chopin in Père Lachaise Cemetery. ... Download high resolution version (500x679, 88 KB)The grave of Chopin in Père Lachaise Cemetery. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote the Requiem mass in D minor (K. 626) in 1791. ... Église de la Madeleine, Paris Léglise de la Madeleine, or Léglise Sainte-Marie-Madeleine (or simply La Madeleine), is a church in the 8th arrondissement of Paris that was designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleons army. ... The Cimetière du Père Lachaise is the largest cemetery in Paris, and one of the most famous cemeteries in the world. ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ...


Music

Chopin's music for the piano combined a unique rhythmic sense (particularly his use of rubato, chromatic inflections, and counterpoint), as well as a piano technique which was of his own creation. This mixture produces a particularly fragile sound in the melody and the harmony, which are nonetheless underpinned by solid and interesting harmonic techniques. He took the new salon genre of the nocturne, invented by Irish composer John Field, to a deeper level of sophistication, and endowed popular dance forms, such as the Polish mazurka and the Viennese waltz with a greater range of melody and expression. Chopin was the first to write Ballades (a genre he invented) and the Scherzi as individual pieces. Chopin also took the example of Bach's préludes and transformed the genre. A nocturne (from the French for nocturnal) is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. ... John Field (July 26, 1782 – January 23, 1837) was an Irish composer and pianist. ... The mazurka is a Polish folk dance in triple time with a usually moderate tempo, containing a heavy accent on the third or second beat. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... The waltz is a dance in 3/4 time, done primarily in closed position, the commonest basic figure of which is a full turn in two measures using three steps per measure. ...


Several melodies of Chopin's have become well known; because of their unique melodic shape they are instantly memorable and easily recognized. Among these are the Revolutionary Étude (Op. 10, No. 12), the Minute Waltz (Op. 64, No. 1), and the third movement of his Funeral March sonata (Op. 35), which is used as an iconic representation of grief. Interestingly, the Revolutionary Etude was not written with the failed Polish uprising against Russia in mind, it merely appeared at that time. The Funeral March was written for funerals, but it was not inspired by any recent personal loss of Chopin's. Other melodies have even been used as the basis of popular songs, such as the slow section of the Fantaisie-Impromptu (Op. 66). These pieces often rely on an intense and personalized chromaticism, as well as a melodic curve that resembles the operas of Chopin's day - the operas of Rossini, Donizetti, and especially Bellini. Chopin used the piano to re-create the gracefulness of the singing voice, and talked and wrote constantly about singers. Étude in C minor, Op. ... The Waltz in D flat major, opus 64, No. ... A funeral march is a march composed, usually in a minor key, in in a slow simple duple metre imitating the solemn pace of a funeral procession. ... The piano composition Fantaisie-Impromptu, opus 66, by Frederic Chopin, is his most well-known piece and one of the most famous works on classical piano. ...


Chopin's style and gifts became increasingly influential: Schumann was a huge admirer of Chopin's music — although the feeling was not mutual — and he took melodies from Chopin and even named a piece of his Carnaval Suite after Chopin; Franz Liszt, another great admirer of the composer, transcribed several Chopin songs for unaccompanied piano. Liszt later dedicated a movement of his Harmonies Poétiques et Religieuses to Chopin, titling it Funérailles and laconically dedicating it "October 1849." The mid-section recalls, powerfully, the famous octave trio section of Chopin's Polonaise, op. 53. Robert Schumanns Carnaval, op. ... Franz Liszt (Hungarian; Liszt Ferenc) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist and composer. ...


Chopin had strong opinions of how his music should be performed and many common performances practices of Chopin today are at odds with his aesthetic. Arguably, some of the best records of Chopin include those by Koczalski, Friedman, Cortot, Rubinstein, Malcuzynski, Janis, Magaloff, Pollini and Zimmerman. Raul Koczalski, a Polish pianist who is relatively obscure today, was arguably the greatest interpreter of Chopin, and one of the greatest pianists of his time. ... Alfred Cortot (September 26, 1877 – June 15, 1962) was a French (or Swiss) pianist and conductor. ... Arthur Rubinstein photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1937 Arthur Rubinstein (January 28, 1887 – December 20, 1982) was a famous Polish-American pianist, best known for his performances of Chopin and his championing of Spanish music. ... Byron (Yankelevitch) Janis (born March 24, 1928) is an American pianist widely considered to be one of the twentieth centurys greatest musicians (Classical CD). ... Maurizio Pollini Maurizio Pollini (born January 5, 1942) is an Italian pianist. ...


Chopin performed his own works in concert halls but most often in his salon for friends. Only later in life, as his disease progressed, did Chopin give up public performance altogether.


Several of Chopin's piano works carry with them their own technique: his préludes (Op. 28) and études (Op. 10 and 25) rapidly became standard works. They also became influential, inspiring both Liszt's Transcendental Études and Schumann's Symphonic Études. The Transcendental Etudes (sometimes Études dexécution transcendante or Transcendental Studies) is a series of twelve compositions written for solo piano by Hungarian composer Franz Liszt, begun in 1826 and finalized in 1851. ...


Chopin and Romanticism

Chopin regarded the Romantic movement with indifference, if not distaste, and rarely associated himself with it directly. Even so, today Chopin's music is considered to be the paragon of the Romantic style. Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas; it originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ...


However, his music has less of the expected trappings of Romanticism - While he did pour forth impassioned outbursts of music, in everything he wrote there is a classical purity and discretion, with little Romantic exhibitionism. Unlike his flamboyant contemporary, Franz Liszt, Chopin was withdrawn from public life. Franz Liszt (Hungarian; Liszt Ferenc) (October 22, 1811 – July 31, 1886) was a Hungarian virtuoso pianist and composer. ...


All of his works, without exception, involve the piano, whether solo or accompanied. They are predominantly for solo piano but include a small number of works for piano and secondary instruments, including a second piano, violin, cello, voice, and orchestra.


Works

Chopin's compositional output consists mainly of music for solo piano. His larger scale works such as the ballades, scherzos, the barcarolle, and sonatas have cemented a solid place within the repertoire, as well as shorter works like his impromptus, mazurkas, nocturnes, waltzes and polonaises. This article is about the modern musical instrument. ... The ballade was a verse form consisting of three (sometimes five) stanzas, each with the same metre, rhyme scheme and last line, with a shorter concluding stanza (an envoi). ... A scherzo (plural scherzi) is a name given to a piece of music or a movement from a larger piece such as a symphony. ... Sonata (From Latin and Italian sonare, to sound), in music, sonata literally means a piece played as opposed to cantata (Latin cantare, to sing), a piece sung. ... For information about impromptu speaking in public debate, see individual events. ... The mazurka is a Polish folk dance in triple time with a usually moderate tempo, containing a heavy accent on the third or second beat. ... A nocturne (from the French for nocturnal) is usually a musical composition that is inspired by, or evocative of, the night. ... The waltz is a dance in 3/4 time, done primarily in closed position, the commonest basic figure of which is a full turn in two measures using three steps per measure. ... The polonaise (polonez, chodzony) is a rather slow dance of Polish origin, in 3/4 time. ...


Two important collections are the 24 Preludes Op. 28, based loosely on Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, and the etudes, which are a staple of that genre for pianists. In music, the BACH motif is the sequence of notes B flat, A, C, B natural. ... Title-page of Das wohtemperierte Klavier A flat major (As-dur) fugue from the second part of Das wohtemperierte Klavier (manuscript) The Well-Tempered Clavier (Das wohltemperierte Klavier in German -- Klavier means piano, but the English word clavier (which means keyboard) looks more like the German title) consists of two... An etude (from the French word étude meaning study) is a short musical composition designed to provide practice in a particular technical skill in the performance of a solo instrument. ...


Chopin's two piano concertos, Opp. 11 and 21, are masterpieces still often performed. In addition, he wrote several songs set to Polish texts, and several pieces including a piano trio and a sonata for cello and piano. A piano concerto is a concerto for solo piano and orchestra. ... The Piano Concerto No. ... Frédéric Chopins Piano Concerto No. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (possibly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ... A piano trio is a group of piano and two other instruments, almost always a violin and a cello, or a piece of music written for such a group. ... Sonata (From Latin and Italian sonare, to sound), in music, sonata literally means a piece played as opposed to cantata (Latin cantare, to sing), a piece sung. ... A cropped image to show the relative size of a cello to a human (Uncropped Version) The cello (also violoncello or cello) (pronounced Cheh-loh) is a stringed instrument and a member of the violin family. ... This article is about the modern musical instrument. ...


For a complete list of Chopin's works by opus number, see List of compositions by Frédéric Chopin. List of compositions by Frédéric Chopin. ...


Bibliography

  • Chopinian Bibliography (http://chopin.nifc.pl/icich/source.php?m=8&type=6&cat=1&subcat=2&lng=_en) The largest electronical database containing bibliographical records (currently 11.000+)

Other

In commemoration of the genius of Frédéric Chopin, the International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition is held in Warsaw, Poland every five years. The International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition is one of the oldest and the most prestigious piano competition in the world, organized in Warsaw since 1927 and held every 5 years since 1955. ... Warsaw (Polish: Warszawa, see also other names, in full The Capital City of Warsaw, Polish: Miasto Stołeczne Warszawa) is the capital of Poland and its largest city. ...


Eponyms

The following have been named after the composer:

3784 Chopin is a small main belt asteroid with a diameter of 14. ... Warsaw Frederic Chopin Airport () is an airport located in Warsaw, Poland. ...

Media

  • Listen to Chopin's Fantaisie-Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66 (20kB MIDI file) or download high quality synthesized version (3.5MB Vorbis file). Most of this piano solo features 4:3 polyrhythm.

Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ... Fantasie-Impromptu -- Frederic Chopin. ... Vorbis is an open and free audio compression (codec) project from the Xiph. ... Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms. ...

See also

Frédéric-François Chopin, portrayed by Eugène Delacroix Several piano competitions are named after Frédéric Chopin, one of the most famous piano composers and pianists ever. ... Great Emigration (Polish: Wielka Emigracja), Polish political (1831–1870). ... Chopins Polonaise - a Ball in Hotel Lambert in Paris, water colour and gouache, 1849-1860, painted by Teofil Kwiatkowski, National Museum in Poznan. ... Carl Mikuli (1819–1897) is most well known as an editor of works by Chopin, his teacher. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
  • Internet Chopin Information Centre (http://chopin.nifc.pl/icich/index.php?lng=_en) - Chopin portal with calendary, catalogues, and other information about Chopin, also pianists' biographical notes, Chopin in th Web and more.
  • ChopinMusic (http://www.chopinmusic.net) - Chopin website with recordings, sheet music, photo galleries, a forum and more.
  • Biographies (Project Gutenberg e-texts):
    • Life of Chopin, by Franz Liszt (http://www.gutenberg.net/etext/4386)
    • Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician, by Frederick Niecks (http://www.gutenberg.net/etext/4973)
    • Chopin: The Man and his Music, by James Huneker (http://www.gutenberg.net/etext/4939)
  • Chopin's partitions (http://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/make-table.cgi?Composer=ChopinFF&preview=1) from Mutopia Project
  • Chopin's music collection on Classical Music Archives (http://www.classicalarchives.com/chopin.html)
  • International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition (http://www.konkurs.chopin.pl/index_en.html)

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Recordings

  • Free recordings of Chopin's music (http://innig.net/music/betts-chopin/) performed by Donald Betts (3 ballades, 3 études, 2 nocturnes, 1 mazurka)
  • Free recordings of Chopin's music (http://innig.net/music/inthehands/category/recordings/chopin/) performed by Paul Cantrell
  • Piano Society.com — Chopin (http://www.pianosociety.com/index.php?id=9) — Various free recordings of Chopin's music in MP3 format.
  • Classic Cat — Chopin (http://www.classiccat.net/chopin_f/index.htm) — An overview of free Chopin recordings on the internet by Classic Cat — the free classical music directory.
  • The Chopin MIDI Archive (http://www.gressus.se/chopin/midi/chopin.html) — Chopin's works in MIDI format.

 
 

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