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Encyclopedia > Fourth Age
The History of Arda
Valian Years

Years of the Lamps
Years of the Trees
Years of the Sun Image File history File links Arda. ... The main part of this article relates to a version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by many Tolkien fans (see: Middle-earth canon); it may contradict parts of The Silmarillion or other texts. ... Based on the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Valian Years are a reference to the passage of time between the first arrival of the Ainur in Arda and the first sunrise. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Years of the Lamps are the first of the three great time-periods of Arda. ... A map of Aman, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Years of the Trees are one of the three great time-periods of Arda. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Years of the Sun are the last of the three great time-periods of Arda, together with the Years of the Lamps and the Years of the Trees. ...

Ages of the Children of Ilúvatar

First Age
Second Age
Third Age
Fourth Age and later The main part of this article relates to a version of Middle-earths history that is considered canon by many Tolkien fans (see: Middle-earth canon); it may contradict parts of The Silmarillion or other texts. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the awakening of the Elves, and ended with the final overthrow of Morgoth by the combined armies of Valinor and Beleriand. ... The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ...

Final Battle
Timeline of Arda

The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkien's universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Silmarillion follow. ... This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ...


Most of his fiction about Middle-earth concerned earlier ages, and there is relatively little material on these later ages that followed the Third Age. For other uses, see The Third Age. ...


The Fourth Age followed the defeat of Sauron and the destruction of his Ruling Ring, but did not officially begin until after the Bearers of the Three Rings left Middle-earth for the Uttermost West.[1] For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the video game developer see Three Rings Design. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ...


Some events of the first centuries of the Fourth Age can be gleaned from the Appendices, and follow below.

Contents

Men

Realms of Men prospered, as the re-united Númenórean kingdoms in exile (as the Reunited Kingdom of Gondor and Arnor) fully recovered under Elessar and later Eldarion. Lasting peace was made with former Mannish enemies: at least some Easterlings and Haradrim either became allies, or even became part of the Reunited Kingdom; in the appendices it states that Éomer fulfilled the oath of Eorl by riding with Elessar to war on the plains of Harad and beyond the sea of Rhûn, so fighting would continue with at least some of the Men who had allied with Sauron in the past. Many former slaves of Sauron were freed, and given land in Mordor around the sea of Núrnen for their own. Allied realms such as Rohan and Esgaroth also prospered, as did the protected enclaves of the Shire and the Woses of Ghân-buri-Ghân. The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... Properly, the Reunited Kingdom of Arnor and Gondor is a fictional realm from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II, is an important character from J. R. R Tolkiens legendarium. ... Eldarion Telcontar is a character from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Easterlings were Men who lived in the east of Middle-earth, and were enemies of the Free Peoples. ... “Southrons” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... Mount Doom and Barad-dûr in Mordor, as depicted in the Peter Jackson film. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Sea of Núrnen was an inland sea in Mordor, Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... Esgaroth upon the Long Lake, also known as Lake-town, is a fictional community of Men in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, the Drúedain, also known as Drûgin (singular being Drug), Woses, Wild Men of the Woods and Púkel-men, were a strange race of Men which was counted amongst the Edain. ... Ghân-buri-Ghân, or simply Ghân, is a character in the epic fantasy Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. ...


Elves

It is said that after the fall of the Dark Tower and the passing of Sauron at the start of the fourth age the land of Lórien was attacked three times from the fortress of Dol Guldur. The elves of Lórien managed to rid the forest of Mirkwood of any evil (which mostly resided in Dol Guldur). It is also said that Celeborn took many boats of elves, ready for war down the river Anduin and attacked Dol Guldur for, Galadriel herself threw down its walls and lay bare to its pits; thus the forest was cleansed. Later on, Celeborn and Thranduil met in the midst of the wood and named it Eryn Lasgalen. The Sylvan realms in Eryn Lasgalen (Thranduil's realm and Celeborn's East Lórien) seem to have expanded somewhat, although much of its population gradually departed to the West. The Grey Havens and with it the rest of Lindon were abandoned, save for Círdan and a few others, who remained behind. For at least a while an Elven colony led by Legolas was founded in Ithilien. For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... In the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Dol Guldur, or Hill of Sorcery, was a stronghold of Sauron located in the south of Mirkwood. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy book The Lord of the Rings, Celeborn (pronounced with a hard c as in cat) is the Elven husband of Galadriel; Lord of the Galadhrim; and co-ruler along with Galadriel of Lothlórien. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Anduin is the Sindarin name for the Great River of Wilderland, the longest river in the Third Age (the original Sindarin name means Long River). ... Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ... King Thranduil was a character in the fictitious world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For the game Mirkwood, see Mirkwood (mud). ... King Thranduil was a character in the fictitious world of Middle-earth created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... The Mithlond or the Grey Havens was a haven (seaport) on the Gulf of Lune in the northwest of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... Spoiler warning: In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Lindon is the land beyond the Ered Luin (Blue Mountains) in the northwest of Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Círdan (ship-maker in Sindarin) the Shipwright is a Teleri Elf (of which he was one of the wisest princes), a great mariner and shipwright, lord of the Falas during much of the First Age, the wisest and perhaps the second... Legolas is a main character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, Ithilien is a region and fiefdom of Gondor. ...


Dwarves

The Dwarves of Durin's Folk prospered in Erebor, and there are indications Gimli led a group of dwarves to Aglarond. Mining expeditions were sent to Khazad-dûm where mithril was again mined, used to restore the gates of Minas Tirith, but Khazad-dûm was not immediately recolonized. There are however indications that a Durin the Last later did rebuild this Dwarven Kingdom, returning Durin's Folk to their ancestral homes. Apparently the Dwarven race began to dwindle by the end of the Fourth age, for their women made up less than a third of their population. Often, the women would want a husband that they couldn't have and so would not marry. Similarly, many Dwarven men were too engrossed in their crafts and did not have the time to take a wife and have children. Their ultimate fate is unclear. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Durins folk is the most important folk of Dwarves. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Lonely Mountain (Sindarin Erebor) is a mountain in the northeast of Rhovanion. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Aglarond was a name for the Hornburg as well as the Glittering Caves behind it at Helms Deep. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world, Middle-earth, Moria (also known as Khazad-dûm, The Black Chasm, The Black Pit, Dwarrowdelf, Hadhodrond, and Phurunargian) is the name given to the underground city, mines, and connected tunnels that run through the central Misty Mountains. ... Mithril is a fictional metal from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth fantasy writings. ... Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... Durin is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens universe, Middle-earth. ...


Others

Orcs and Trolls fled to the far east, and never really recovered. Either during Eldarion's rule or near the end of Aragorn's, there was some talk of "Orc-cults" although these seem to have been founded and run by humans.[2] In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, Trolls are very large (twelve feet tall or more) humanoids of great strength and poor intellect. ...


The Ents apparently never found the Entwives again. Aragorn granted them Fangorn Forest as an enclave and gave them permission to expand the forest again west into the vast wastes of Eriador where once a vast primeval forest had spread, but Treebeard lamented that while the forests may spread again the Ents would not. Over time they dwindled off and more of them became increasingly "tree-ish" and it does not appear that they ever enter into the affairs of other races again (it is unclear if a non-communicative tree-ish Ent can be considered "dead" or if in a sense they persist to the present day). For other uses, see ENT. Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


The Fellowship

Of the remaining members of the Fellowship of the Ring, it is recorded that Samwise Gamgee became mayor of the Shire, and was an advisor of King Elessar. His daughter Elanor became one of Arwen's handmaidens. Near the end of his life he is believed to have left for Valinor on one of the last ships of Círdan. Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... Valinor (meaning Land of the Valar) is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the realm of the Valar in Aman. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Círdan (ship-maker in Sindarin) the Shipwright is a Teleri Elf (of which he was one of the wisest princes), a great mariner and shipwright, lord of the Falas during much of the First Age, the wisest and perhaps the second...


Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took became Master of Buckland and Thain of the Shire respectively in due time. They remained in close friendship with the royal houses of Rohan and Gondor. When of advanced age they departed for Gondor and Rohan together, and both died around F.A. 64. They were buried in Rath Dínen. Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but dearest friends. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium, the Rath Dínen (Sindarin for Silent Street) is the pathway between the city of Minas Tirith and Mindolluin in Gondor. ...


Legolas is said to have eventually built a ship, and to have sailed to the West. According to many, Gimli left with him—the only Dwarf to ever do so—evidently out of his desire to once more see Galadriel. Galadriel is a fictional character created by J. R. R. Tolkien, appearing in The Lord of the Rings. ...


Later centuries

Tolkien's writing does not provide information on more than the first few centuries of this age, so it is not known when it ended. It is stated that the Fourth Age was when Men became dominant in Middle-earth, and the Fading of the Elves began. As such, the Fourth Age marks the bridge from the fantastic fictional pre-history of earth to the real history. Readers of Tolkiens Lord of the Rings often speculate about the Fate of the Elves of Middle-earth. ...


Later Ages

Tolkien said that he thought the time between the end of the Third Age and the 20th century AD was about 6000 years, and that in AD 1958 it should have been around the end of the Fifth Age if the Fourth and Fifth Ages were about the same length as the Second and Third Ages. He said, however, in a letter written in 1958 that he believed the Ages had quickened and that it was about the end of the Sixth Age/beginning of the Seventh.[3] (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Speculation concerning Later Ages

While Tolkien originally described Middle-earth as a fictional early history of the real Earth he later adjusted this slightly to describe it as a mythical time within the history of Earth. This 'mythical' distinction served to remove the stories of Middle-earth from any specific time period where they might contradict known details of actual history.


Determining the epoch of a Fifth Age is important for those who apply the Tolkien calendar to present dates. For example, issue 42 of Mallorn, the journal of the Tolkien Society (August 2004), carried a lengthy article analyzing all the available data and concluding that the Years of the Sun began on March 25, 10160 BC, the Second Age on December 26, 9564 BC, the Third Age on December 24, 6123 BC, and the Fourth Age on March 18, 3102 BC. Following this separation of ages, one arrives at approximately the year 1789 AD, the year of the French Revolution, as the beginning of the Sixth Age. Alternatively, some[attribution needed] choose to align the present Age (Fifth or Sixth) with the year 1 AD, this having the advantage that it simplifies calculations. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Upper Paleolithic (or Upper Palaeolithic) is the third and last subdivision of the Paleolithic or Old Stone Age as it is understood in Europe, Africa and Asia. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See 1 E11 s for more remote dates. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... During the 7th millennium BC, agriculture spreads from Anatolia to the Balkans. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... (33rd century BC - 32nd century BC - 31st century BC - other centuries) (5th millennium BC - 4th millennium BC - 3rd millennium BC) Events Varna nekropol: The oldest gold in the world found near Varna lake. ...


Notes and references

  1. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, Appendix B S.R. 1421–1422. ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  2. ^ As recorded in The New Shadow, the abandoned sequel to the Lord of the Rings.
  3. ^ Carpenter, Humphrey and Tolkien, Christopher (eds.) (1981). The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, #211 pg 283 footnote. ISBN 0-395-31555-7. 

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor, best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... The Shire Calendar was a calendar used in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth by the Hobbits of Shire. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... Christopher Reuel Tolkien (born November 21, 1924) is best known as the third son of author J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), and as the editor of much of his fathers posthumously published work. ... The Letters of J. R. R. Tolkien (ISBN 0-618-05699-8) is a selection of J. R. R. Tolkiens letters published in 1981, edited by Tolkiens biographer Humphrey Carpenter assisted by Christopher Tolkien. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ...

External links

  1. The Encyclopedia of Arda
    • Fourth Age
  2. The Chronology of Middle-earth (article from Mallorn 42)
  3. The Fourth Age: Total War- a Rome: Total War total conversion

See also: Timeline of the Fourth Age. This article includes several timelines relating to J. R. R. Tolkiens fiction. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fourth Age - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (420 words)
The Fourth Age began after Sauron was finally defeated, when his Ruling Ring was destroyed, and the Elves left Middle-earth for the Uttermost West.
This age was (presumably) marked by the recovery of the Númenórean kingdoms in exile (Arnor and Gondor), the final ascent of Men and the total wane of the Elves.
He said, however, in a letter written in 1958 that he believed the Ages had quickened and that it was about the end of the Sixth Age/beginning of the Seventh.
Fourth Age - definition of Fourth Age in Encyclopedia (317 words)
Tolkien said that he thought the distance between the end of the Third Age and the 20th century was about 6000 years, and that in 1958 it should have been around the end of the Fifth Age if the Fourth and Fifth Ages were about the same length as the Second and Third Ages.
He said, however, that he believed the Ages had quickened and that it was about the end of the Sixth Age/beginning of the Seventh.
That implies that maybe the fall of Nazi Germany ended the Sixth Age in 1945, as the other ages also ended with the downfalls of tyrants.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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