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Encyclopedia > Foundation Stone
the Stone - south is towards the top of the image
the Stone - south is towards the top of the image
For the foundation-stone of a building, see Cornerstone.

The Foundation Stone (Hebrew: אבן השתייה, translit. Even haShetiya) or Rock (Arabic: translit. Sakhrah, Hebrew: translit.: Sela) is the name of the rock at the heart of the Dome of the Rock. It is also known as the Pierced Stone due to it having a small hole on the south eastern corner that enters a cavern beneath the rock, known as the Well of Souls. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 407 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (482 × 709 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) El Sakhra (a. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 407 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (482 × 709 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) El Sakhra (a. ... Look up cornerstone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Transliteration in a narrow sense is a mapping from one script into another script. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... Transliteration in a narrow sense is a mapping from one script into another script. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Transliteration in a narrow sense is a mapping from one script into another script. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ...

Contents

Location

The rock is located towards the centre of the Temple Mount, an artificial platform built by Herod the Great on top of vaults over a hill, generally believed to be Mount Moriah. The Rock constitutes the peak of this now hidden hill, which is also the highest in old Jerusalem [citation needed], and hence the Rock is the highest point of the Old City The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... Herod (‎, Greek: ), also known as Herod I or Herod the Great, was a Roman client king of Judaea (73 BC – 4 BC in Jericho)[1]. Herod is known for his colossal building projects in Jerusalem and other parts of the ancient world, including the construction of the Second Temple in... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... ...


There is some controversy among secular scholars about equating Mount Moriah, the Temple Mount and the Foundation Stone as the location where events occurred according to the Biblical narrative; but for Orthodox Jews at least, there is no doubt that all these events occurred in this area. Orthodox Judaism is the formulation of Judaism that adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonised in the Talmudic texts (Oral Torah) and as subsequently developed and applied by the later authorities known as the Gaonim, Rishonim, and Acharonim. ...


Early Jewish writings assist in confirming that the Dome of the Rock is the site of the Holy of Holies and therefore the location of the Foundation Stone. Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer [1], a midrashic narrative of the more important events of the Pentateuch believed to have been compiled in Italy shortly after 833 CE, writes: “Rabbi Yishmael said: In the future, the sons of Ishmael (the Arabs) will do fifteen things in the Land of Israel … They will fence in the breaches of the walls of the Temple and construct a building on the site of the sanctuary”. The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer (Hebrew: פרקי דרבי אליעזר) is a haggadic-midrashic work on Genesis, part of Exodus, and a few sentences of Numbers, ascribed to R. Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, and composed in Italy shortly after 833 CE. It is quoted immediately before the end of the 12th century under the following titles... Midrash (pl. ... Look up Pentateuch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events End of the reign of caliph Al-Mamun Nimmyo succeeds Junna as emperor of Japan Creation of Great Moravia Births Deaths October 10 - al-Mamun, Abbasid caliph of Baghdad Categories: 833 ... “BCE” redirects here. ... Ishmael ben Elisha (90 - 135 CE, commonly known as Rabbi Ishmael) was a Tanna of the first and second centuries (third tannaitic generation). ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Kingdom of Israel: Early ancient historical Israel — land in pink is the approximate area under direct central royal administration during the United Monarchy. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ...


Religious Jewish scholars have discussed the precise location of the rock. The Radbaz is convinced that “under the dome on the Temple Mount, which the Arabs call El-Sakhrah, without a doubt is the location of the Foundation Stone”. [2] The Travels of Rabbi Petachiah of Ratisbon [3] , c.1180, The Travels of Benjamin of Tudela [4] and The Travels of the Student of the Ramban all equally state that "on the Temple Mount stands a beautiful sanctuary which an Arab king built long ago, over the place of the Temple sanctuary and courtyard”. Rabbi Obadiah ben Abraham who wrote a letter from Jerusalem in 1488 says that “I sought the place of the Foundation Stone where the Ark of the Covenant was placed, and many people told me it is under a tall and beautiful dome which the Arabs built in the Temple precinct".[5] Rabbi David ben Solomon ibn Abi Zimra, also called Radbaz, was a Spanish Talmudist and cabalist. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... Also called Petachiah ben Yakov, Moses Petachiah, or Petachiah of Regensburg; Bohemian rabbi of the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries. ... Events April 13 - Frederick Barbarossa issues the Gelnhausen Charter November 18 - France Emperor Antoku succeds Emperor Takakura as emperor of Japan Afonso I of Portugal is taken prisoner by Ferdinand II of Leon Artois is annexed by France Prince Mochihito amasses a large army and instigates the Genpei War between... Map of the route Benjamin of Tudela (flourished 12th century) was a medieval Spanish Jewish Rabbi, traveler and explorer. ... Nahmanides (1194 - c. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... Obadiah ben Abraham of Bertinoro was a Jewish rabbi and a commentator on the Mishnah, commonly known as The Bartenura by Orthodox Judaism Talmud scholars. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... // January 8 - The present Royal Netherlands Navy was formed By decree of Maximillian of Austria. ... The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ...


However, others disagree, citing that if the Southern Wall of the Temple Mount is in fact the one which existed when the Temple was standing, the measurements given in the Talmud do not reconcile [6]. The Holy of Holies ends up being too far north and they therefore locate the Foundation Stone as being directly opposite the current exposed section of the Western Wall, where no building currently stands. This is the view of the Arizal [7] and the Maharsha [8] who state the prophesy that “Zion will become a ploughed field” indicates that no dwelling will be established there until the time of the redemption. It therefore follows that the area of the Temple courtyard and Holy of Holies is situated in the unbuilt area between the Dome of the Rock and the Al Aqsa Mosque[1]. The Temple Mount as it appears today. ... The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The wall by night “Wailing Wall” redirects here. ... The Grave of Isaac Luria in Safed Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534–July 25, 1572) was a Jewish scholar and mystic. ... Samuel Edels (1555–1631), was a renowned rabbi and Talmudist famous for his commentary on the Talmud, Chiddushei Halachot. ... Zion (Hebrew: צִיּוֹן, tziyyon; Tiberian vocalization: tsiyyôn; transliterated Zion or Sion) is a term that most often designates the Land of Israel and its capital Jerusalem. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem is not to be confused with the Dome of the Rock The Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic: المسجد الاقصى, Masjid Al-Aqsa, literally farthest mosque) is part of the complex of religious buildings in Jerusalem...


Some find it difficult to believe that non-Jews could effectively build a place of worship on the spot of the Holy of Holies. They claim that the tradition that the rock under the dome is the Foundation Stone is only attested to by the fact that the Arabs hold it so sacred. Therefore Jews have no clear tradition or proof of their own confirming the uniqueness of the rock [9]. The Zohar Chadash [10] however, recounts that Rav Zeira saw Rabbi Elazar crying and heard him sighing "holy stone, holy stone…in the future the nations will defile you by placing dead bodies on top of you, sullying the holy place”. It was apparently a local Muslim custom at the turn of the 20th century to place dead bodies on the rock before burial [citation needed]. A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Zohar (Hebrew: זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ... Rav Zeira (or Rabbi Zeira ) was a Babylonian Amora mentioned frequently in the Talmud. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


A further opinion believes the position is north of the Dome of the Rock, opposite the Gate of Mercy, which Rabbi Emmanuel Chai Reiki [11] identifies as the Shushan Gate mentioned in the Talmud. This gate was described as being opposite the opening of the sanctuary [2]. The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Golden Gate or Shaar Harachamim This article is about purple flying monkeys. ... The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a. ...


Modern Jewish academics list four possible locations of the Foundation Stone [3]:

  1. The stone is located beneath the Ark of the Covenant under the Dome of the Rock [4].
  2. The stone is located beneath the Altar under the Dome of the Rock [5].
  3. The stone is located beneath the Ark of the Covenant near El Kas fountain to the south of the Dome of the Rock [6].
  4. The stone is located beneath the Ark of the Covenant inside the Ghost Dome situated to the north of the Dome of the Rock [7].

The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ...

Dimensions

Although the rock is part of the surrounding bedrock, the southern side forms a ledge, with a gap between it and the surrounding ground; a set of steps currently uses this gap to provide access from the Dome of the Rock to the Well of Souls beneath it. Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ... Well of Souls can mean several things: 1. ...


The rock has several human-made cuts in its surface; these are generally attributed to the Crusaders, whose frequent damage to the rock was so severe that the Christian kings of Jerusalem finally put a marble slab over the rock to protect it (the marble slab was later removed by Saladin). More recently, there has been speculation that several man-made features of the rock's surface may substantially predate the Crusaders. Leen Ritmeyer noticed that there are sections of the rock cut completely flat, which north-to-south have a width of 6 cubits, precisely the width that the Mishnah credits to the wall of the Holy of Holies, and hence Ritmeyer proposed that these flat sections constitute foundation trenches on top of which the walls of the original temple were laid. However, according to Josephus there were 31 steps up to the Holy of Holies from the lower level of the Temple Mount, and the Mishnah identifies 29 steps in total, and each step was half a cubit in height (according to the Mishnah); this is a height of at least 22 feet - the height of the Sakhra is 21 feet above the lower level of the Temple Mount, and should therefore have been under the floor. This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Official language Latin, French, Italian, and other western languages; Greek and Arabic also widely spoken Capital Jerusalem, later Acre Constitution Various laws, so-called Assizes of Jerusalem The Kingdom of Jerusalem was a Christian kingdom established in the Levant in 1099 by the First Crusade. ... Saladin, properly known as Salah al-Dīn Yusuf ibn Ayyub (Arabic: , Kurdish: , Turkish: ) (c. ... Cubit is the name for any one of many units of measure used by various ancient peoples. ... The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ... A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and...


Nevertheless, taking the flat surface to be the position of the southern wall of a square enclosure, the west and north sides of which are formed by the low clean-cut scarp at these edges of the rock, at the position of the hypothetical centre is a rectangular cut in the rock that is about 2.5 cubits long and 1.5 cubits wide, which are exactly the dimensions of the Ark of the Covenant (according to the Book of Exodus). The bedrock near the Rock shows several signs of having been quarried, and these clean edges and square cuts, could simply have been a result of such activity. The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ...


The Mishnah [12] gives the height of the rock as three finger breadths above the ground. Radbaz [13] discusses the apparent contradiction of the Mishnah’s measurements and the actual measurement of the Rock within the Dome of the Rock which he estimates as the “height of two men” above the ground. He concluded that many changes in the natural configuration of the Temple Mount have taken place which can be attributed to excavations made by the various peoples who have occupied Jerusalem throughout the ages. The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... Rabbi David ben Solomon ibn Abi Zimra, also called Radbaz, was a Spanish Talmudist and cabalist. ... The Dome of the Rock in the center of the Temple Mount, or Mount Moriah The Dome of the Rock (Arabic: مسجد قبة الصخرة, translit. ...


Jewish significance

Postcard depicting the Foundation Stone, c1925.
Postcard depicting the Foundation Stone, c1925.
Main article: Temple in Jerusalem

The Roman-Era Midrash Tanchuma [14] sums up the centrality of and holiness of this site in Judaism: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (426 × 634 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This scanned postcard most probably dates from the 1920s -1930s. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (426 × 634 pixel, file size: 30 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This scanned postcard most probably dates from the 1920s -1930s. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ...

As the navel is set in the centre of the human body,
so is the land of Israel the navel of the world...
situated in the centre of the world,
and Jerusalem in the centre of the land of Israel,
and the sanctuary in the centre of Jerusalem,
and the holy place in the centre of the sanctuary,
and the ark in the centre of the holy place,
and the Foundation Stone before the holy place,
because from it the world was founded.

According to the sages of the Talmud [15] it was from this rock that the world was created, itself being the first part of the Earth to come into existence. In the words of the Zohar [16]: “The world was not created until God took a stone called Even haShetiya and threw it into the depths where it was fixed from above till below, and from it the world expanded. It is the centre point of the world and on this spot stood the Holy of Holies”. The first page of the Vilna Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Berachot, folio 2a. ... The Zohar (Hebrew: זהר Splendor, radiance) is widely considered the most important work of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. ...


According to the Talmud, it was close to here, on the site of the Altar, that God gathered the earth that was formed into Adam. It was on this rock that Adam - and later Cain, Abel, and Noah - offered sacrifices to God. Jewish sources identify this rock as the place mentioned in the Bible where Abraham fulfilled God's test to see if he would be willing to sacrifice his son Isaac, The mountain identified as Moriah in Genesis 22. It is also identified as the rock upon which Jacob dreamt about angels ascending and descending on a ladder and consequently consecrating and offering a sacrifice upon. Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... In the Book of Genesis, Abel (Hebrew הֶבֶל / הָבֶל, Standard Hebrew Hével / Hável, Tiberian Hebrew Héḇel / Hāḇel; Arabic هابيل HābÄ«l) was the second son of Adam. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... “Abram” redirects here. ... Abraham Sacrificing Isaac by Laurent de LaHire, 1650 Akedah or the Binding of Isaac (‎, Akedát Yitzhák) in Genesis 22, is narration from the Hebrew Bible, in which God asks Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac on Mount Moriah. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... Jacob Wrestling with the Angel – Gustave Doré, 1855 Jacob or Yaakov, (Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: يعقوب, ; holds the heel), also known as Israel (Hebrew: יִשְׂרָאֵל, Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: اسرائيل, ; Struggled with God), is the third Biblical patriarch. ...


When, according to the Bible, King David purchased a threshing floor owned by Araunah the Jebusite [17], it is believed that it was upon this rock that he offered the sacrifice mentioned in the verse. He wanted to construct a permanent Temple there, but as his hands were "bloodied," he was forbidden to do so himself. The task was left to his son Solomon, who completed the Temple in c. 950 BCE. This page is about the Biblical king David. ... Araunah is the name given by the Books of Samuel to a Jebusite who owned a threshing floor that was purchased by David and turned into an altar. ... According to the Hebrew Bible the Jebusites (Hebrew יְבוּסִי, Standard Hebrew Yəvusi, Tiberian Hebrew Yəḇûsî) were a Canaänite tribe who inhabited the region around Jerusalem in pre-biblical times (second millennium BC). ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Solomons Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Beit HaMikdash), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Bible, the first Jewish Temple in Jerusalem. ...


The Mishnah in tractate Yoma [18] mentions a stone situated in the Holy of Holies that was called Shetiya and had been revealed by the early prophets, (i.e. David and Samuel [19]) The Mishnah (Hebrew משנה, repetition) is a major source of rabbinic Judaisms religious texts. ... Moed (Festivals) is the second Order of the Mishnah (also the Tosefta and Talmud), Of the six orders of the Mishna, Moed is the third shortest. ... A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... Samuel or Shmuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל, Standard Tiberian ) is an important leader of ancient Israel in the Book(s) of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. ...


An early Christian source noting Jewish attachment to the rock may be found in the Bordeaux Pilgrim, written between 333-334 CE when Jerusalem was under Roman rule, which describes a “…perforated stone to which the Jews come every year and anoint it, bewail themselves with groans, rend their garments, and so depart.” [8] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Itinerarium Burdigalense (also known as the Itinerarium Hierosolymitanum) is the oldest known Itinerarium, written by an anonymous pilgrim from Burdigala (present-day Bordeaux). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


Role in the Temple

Situated inside the Holy of Holies, this was the rock upon which the Ark of the Covenant was placed in the First Temple [20]. During the Second Temple period when the Ark of the Covenant had been hidden, the stone was used by High Priest who offered up the incense and sprinkled the blood of the sacrifices on it during the Yom Kippur Service. A Holy of Holies is the most sacred place within a sacred building. ... The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... Solomons Temple was the first Jewish temple in Jerusalem which functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. ... A stone (2. ... The Ark of the Covenant (ארון הברית in Hebrew: aron habrit) is described in the Hebrew Bible as a sacred container, wherein rested the stone tablets containing the Ten Commandments as well as other sacred Israelite objects. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר ) is a Jewish holiday, known in English as the Day of Atonement. ...


It has also been argued that the rock instead marks the position of the original temple's altar[citation needed], with the hole in the rock being used for draining away the blood from sacrifices. However, since it is now known that the Well of Souls (the cavern into which the hole opens) has no outlet, this view is seen as somewhat implausible since blood being poured into the hole would simply fill an ever increasing pool until it overflowed.


Commemoration in Jewish law

The Jerusalem Talmud [21] states: The Jerusalem Talmud (In Hebrew Talmud Yerushalmi, in short known as the Yerushalmi), also known as the Palestinian Talmud, like its Babylonian counterpart (see Babylonian Talmud), is a collection of Rabbinic discussions elaborating on the Mishnah. ...


"נשייא דנהגן דלא למישתייה עמרא מן דאב עליל מנהג – שבו פסקה אבן שתייה"


"Women are accustomed not to prepare or attach warp threads to a weaving loom [22] from Rosh Chodesh Av onwards (till after Tisha B'Av), because during the month of Av the Foundation Stone (and the Temple) was destroyed" [23]. WaRp. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... Rosh Chodesh (Hebrew: Head/Beginning [of the Hebrew] Month) is the name for the first day of every month in the [[Hebrew calendar]]. Although Rosh Chodesh is not considered a religious holiday, it is observed with additional [[Jewish prayer]]s, including the Psalms of Hallel (praise) in all Orthodox and... Av (אָב, Standard Hebrew Av, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĀḇ; from Akkadian abu) is also the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year and the fifth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Tisha BAv (Hebrew: תשעה באב or ט׳ באב), or the Ninth of Av, is an annual fast day in Judaism. ... Av (אָב, Standard Hebrew Av, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĀḇ; from Akkadian abu) is also the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year and the fifth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ...


Citing this, the Mishnah Berurah [24] rules that not only are women not to prepare or attach warp threads to a weaving loom, but it is forbidden for anyone to make, buy or wear new clothes or shoes from the beginning of the week in which Tisha B'av falls until after the fast, and that people should ideally not do so from the beginning of Av. Mishnah Berurah (Hebrew: Clarified Teaching) is a work of halakha (Jewish law) by Rabbi Yisrael Meir Kagan, better known as The Chofetz Chaim (Poland, 1838 - 1933). ... // [edit] Game Developer WARP is a now-defunct video game developer. ... For other uses, see Loom (disambiguation). ... Tisha BAv (Hebrew: תשעה באב or ט׳ באב), or the Ninth of Av, is an annual fast day in Judaism. ... Av (אָב, Standard Hebrew Av, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĀḇ; from Akkadian abu) is also the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year and the fifth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ...


In further commemoration of the Foundation Stone, it is also forbidden to eat meat or drink wine from the beginning of the week in which Tisha B'av falls until after the fast. Some have the custom to refrain from these foodstuffs from Rosh Chodesh Av, while others do so from the Seventeenth of Tammuz [25]. Rosh Chodesh (Hebrew: Head/Beginning [of the Hebrew] Month) is the name for the first day of every month in the [[Hebrew calendar]]. Although Rosh Chodesh is not considered a religious holiday, it is observed with additional [[Jewish prayer]]s, including the Psalms of Hallel (praise) in all Orthodox and... Av (אָב, Standard Hebrew Av, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĀḇ; from Akkadian abu) is also the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year and the fifth month of the civil year on the Hebrew calendar. ... Seventeenth of Tammuz (שבעה עשר בתמוז Hebrew: Shiva Assar BeTammuz) is the seventeenth day on the Hebrew month of Tammuz. ...


Liturgical references

In the days when Selichot are recited, in the days leading up to Rosh Hashana until Yom Kippur, the supplications include the following references: Selichot (Heb. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר ) is a Jewish holiday, known in English as the Day of Atonement. ...


טענתנו גפי קרת נתונים, ישבתנו שן סלע איתנים


You carried us and placed us on the [Holy] City’s height, You settled us on the Patriarch’s rocky peak [26].


רבוצה עליו אבן שתית חטובים...שמה בתוך לפני מזיב מאשנבים


Upon it lying the stone from which the foundation was hewn…Who gives ear from which the waters flow (i.e. the foundation stone "from which flow all the waters of the world") [27].


During Sukkot the following references to the Foundation Stone are mentioned in the Hoshanot recital: Sukkot (Hebrew: סוכות or סֻכּוֹת,  ; booths. ... Sukkot (Hebrew: סוכות or סֻכּוֹת,  ; booths. ...


הושענא! – אבן שתיה – הושענא


Please save! – Foundation Stone – Please save!


הושענא! – תאדרנו באבן תלולה – הושענא


Please save! – Adorn us with the elevated Stone – Please save!


Muslim significance

Main article: Isra and Mi'raj

According to Islamic belief, angels visited the rock 2,000 years before Adam was created. All the prophets of God prior to Muhammad were believed to have prayed at the rock which is surrounded daily by 70,000 angels. It is here that Israfil will blow the last trumpet on the Resurrection Day when the dead rise from their graves. [9] A 16th century Persian miniature painting celebrating Muhammads ascent into the Heavens, a journey known as the Miraj. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... In Islam angels are light-based creatures, created by Allah to serve and worship him. ... // Main article: Jewish eschatology Orthodox Judaism holds that belief in the Resurrection of the Dead is one of the cardinal principles of the Jewish faith. ...


In Islamic tradition, the rock is said to be the location where Muhammad ascended to heaven, and during this ascension, the rock itself tried to join Muhammad (starting to rise at the southern end, hence the gap) but was held down by the Archangel Gabriel; in connection with this belief some marks on the western side of the rock are said to be the fingerprints of Gabriel. It is also said that the hoof print of Muhammad’s steed, El Burak from which he was propelled to heaven on, can be seen imprinted in the rock. Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation. ... Buraq from a 17th-century Mughal miniature The Buraq (Arabic: البُراق al-buraaq, meaning lightning, also means the element boron; Turkish: Burak), is according to Islamic tradition a creature from the heavens that carried Muhammad from earth to heaven and back during the Isra and Miraj (Night Journey). ...


See also

The Black Stone, surrounded by its silver frame and the black cloth kiswa on the Kaaba in Mecca The Black Stone (called الحجر الأسود al-Hajar-ul-Aswad in Arabic) is a Muslim object of reverence, said by some to date back to the time of Adam and Eve. ...

References

  1. ^ Chapter 30.
  2. ^ Responsa 691.
  3. ^ A. Benisch, Travels of Petachia of Ratisbon (with English translation), London 1856.
  4. ^ The Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela: Travels in the Middle Ages; (English translation originally published by Joseph Simon/Pangloss Press in 1993, ISBN 0-934710-07-4).
  5. ^ Avraham Ya'ari, Igrot Eretz Yisrael, Ramat Gan 1971.
  6. ^ Kaftor VeFerach.
  7. ^ Emek HaMelech, Preface, paragraph 9.
  8. ^ End of Makkot.
  9. ^ Responsa Tzitz Eliezer, Vol.10, Ch.1:60.
  10. ^ Vayetzei 35.
  11. ^ Aderes Eliyahu.
  12. ^ Tractate Yoma 5:3.
  13. ^ Responsa (639).
  14. ^ Kedoshim Ch.10.
  15. ^ Tractate Yoma 54b.
  16. ^ Vayechi 1:231.
  17. ^ 1 Chronicles 21:25, and 2 Samuel 24:18-25.
  18. ^ Tractate Yoma 5:2.
  19. ^ Tractate Sotah 48b.
  20. ^ Zohar Vayechi 1:231; Midrash Tanchuma Acharei Ch.3 - (see Etz Yosef commentary); Maimonides, Beis HaBechirah 4:1.
  21. ^ Pesachim 4:1.
  22. ^ This follows the version recorded by Rav Nissim Gaon.
  23. ^ i.e. the stone became obsolete from its function in the Temple.
  24. ^ 551:7, 8.
  25. ^ This is derived from the fact that another version of the same piece of Talmud reads: "למישתייה חמרא" “(to refrain) from drinking wine”. This follows the version recorded by Hai Gaon. It is brought down by the Kolbo, Hilchos Tisha B’Av, and Machzor Vitri 263.
  26. ^ Artscroll Selichos, Second day, Selicha 5.
  27. ^ Artscroll Selichos, Fast of Gedalia, Selicha 46.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Corner Stone (719 words)
A rite entitled "De benedictione et impositione Primarii Lapidis pro ecclesia aedificanda" (Of the blessing and laying of the Foundation Stone for the building of a church) is provided in the Roman Pontifical.
An interesting fragment of evidence is, however, furnished by what is apparently the inscribed foundation stone of the first church of St. Mark at Venice.
"When the foundations have been dug," he says, "it is necessary that the bishop sprinkle the place with holy water and that he himself, or some priest at his bidding, should lay the first stone of the foundation, which ought to have a cross engraved upon it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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