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Encyclopedia > Fort Worth, Texas
City of Fort Worth
Official flag of City of Fort Worth
Flag
Official seal of City of Fort Worth
Seal
Nickname: Cowtown
Motto: "Where the West Begins"
Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas
Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas
Coordinates: 32°45′26.49″N 97°19′59.45″W / 32.7573583, -97.3331806
Country United States
State Texas
Counties Tarrant, Denton
Government
 - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief
Area
 - City 298.9 sq mi (774.1 km²)
 - Land 292.5 sq mi (757.7 km²)
 - Water 6.3 sq mi (16.4 km²)
Elevation 653 ft (216 m)
Population (2006)[1]
 - City 653,320
 - Density 1,827.8/sq mi (705.7/km²)
 - Metro 6,003,967
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 682, 817
FIPS code 48-27000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1380947GR3
Website: fortworthgov.org

Fort Worth is the fifth-largest city in the state of Texas, 18th-largest city in the United States[1], as well as the fastest growing large city in the nation from 2000-2006 [2] and was voted one of "America’s Most Livable Communities."[3] Image of downtown Fort Worth; taken by gdvanc and available for use under File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Fort_Worth_seal. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Tarrant_County_Texas_Incorporated_Areas_Fort_Worth_highlighted. ... Tarrant County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Index: Contents: Top - A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Anderson County formed in 1846 from part of Houston County. ... Tarrant County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... The (old) Denton County Courthouse, resting place of the countys namesake. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Michael J. Moncrief, a life-long resident of Fort Worth, is the 43rd mayor of the City of Fort Worth. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... North American area codes 682 and 817 are state of Texas telephone area code for numbers near the Fort Worth area. ... North American area codes 682 and 817 are state of Texas telephone area code for numbers near the Fort Worth area. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... 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Situated in North Texas, Fort Worth covers nearly 300 square miles in Tarrant and Denton counties, serving as the county seat for Tarrant County. As of the 2006 U.S. Census estimate, Fort Worth had a population of 653,320.[1] The city is the second-largest cultural and economic center of the Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area (commonly called the Metroplex), the fourth-largest metropolitan area in the U.S. with a population of 6 million in twelve counties. Fort Worth and the surrounding Metroplex area offer numerous business opportunities and a wide array of attractions. North Texas. ... Tarrant County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... The (old) Denton County Courthouse, resting place of the countys namesake. ... The U.S. Census is mandated by the United States Constitution. ... The Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington metropolitan area, a title designated by the U.S. Census as of 2003, encompasses 12 counties within the U.S. state of Texas. ... A metroplex is large metropolitan area containing several cities and their suburbs. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas. ...


Established originally in 1849 as a protective Army outpost at the foot of a bluff overlooking the Trinity River, the city of Fort Worth today still embraces and boasts of being more down-home, laid-back, and is proud of its traditionally old-fashioned ways when compared to its larger, more flashy eastern neighbor, Dallas. Dallas redirects here. ...


Fort Worth still celebrates its colorful Western heritage that is deeply rooted in strong Southern influences.[citation needed] Fort Worth's legendary "Western heritage" was made possible by settlers from the Old South looking for a new start. Fort Worth can be called a "gateway" to a cultural region, sometimes referred to as the "Western South."[citation needed] Geographically, Old South is a subregion of the American South, differentiated from the Deep South as being the Southern States represented in the original thirteen American colonies, as well as a way of describing the former lifestyle in the Southern United States. ...

Contents

History

Old map (1876)
Old map (1876)

In 1843, the Republic of Texas commissioners signed a treaty with the Native American tribes dividing the new frontier. Native Americans were given the land to the left of an imaginary line, while the settlers were given the land to the East. This imaginary line became known as the place 'where the West begins'. This article is about the history of Fort Worth, Texas. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 722 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (5385 × 4472 pixel, file size: 12. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 722 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (5385 × 4472 pixel, file size: 12. ...


By the 1840's scores of Americans from the East coast were moving westward. As Ranchers and Settlers from the Eastern states made their way into the area, Native Americans retreated from the North Texas frontier. Meanwhile, tensions mounted between the Republic of Texas and its southern neighbor, Mexico, since Texas' victory over Mexico at San Jacinto in 1836.


The War

Texas remained an independent Republic for nine years prior to being annexed as the 28th state on December 29, 1845. Less than three months later on March 24, 1846, an American Army commanded by General Zachary Taylor was encamped along the northern banks of the Rio Grande, directly across the river from Mexican soldiers. Within a month, hostilities commenced and a large body of Mexican cavalrymen attacked a patrol of dragoons (soldiers trained to fight on foot, but who transports himself via horseback) on April 23, 1846. Declaring, "American blood had been shed on American soil", President Polk addressed Congress, who declared war on Mexico on May 13, 1846. is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


Major General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849) was second in command to General Zachary Taylor at the opening of the Mexican-American War in 1846. Born in Hudson, NY, Worth was a tall and commanding figure said to be the best horseman and handsomest man in the Army. He was of a manly, generous nature, and possessed talents that would have won him distinction on any field of action. While leading his troops, Worth himself personally planted the first American flag on the Rio Grande. William Jenkins Worth was a United States general during the Mexican-American War Early Life Worth was born on March 1, 1794 in Hudson, New York. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000...


Under General Taylor, Worth conducted negotiations for Mexico's surrender of Matamoros and was entrusted with the assault on the Bishop's Palace in Monterrey, Mexico. The assault on the Bishop's Palace was a hazardous undertaking. Worth and his troops managed to drag their cannon and ammunition over adverse terrain and up sheer cliff faces while under constant heavy enemy fire. Worth passed from post to post during the entire action on horseback escaping personal injury and losing a minimal number of his soldiers.


Worth played a critical role in the capture of Puebla (Mexico's second largest city in 1846) and was one of the first to enter the city of Mexico, where he personally cut down the Mexican flag that waved over the National Palace. At the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848, Worth was placed in command of the Department of Texas in 1849.


The Fort

In January 1849 Worth proposed a line of ten forts to mark the Western Texas frontier from Eagle Pass to the confluence of the West Fork and Clear Fork of the Trinity River. One month later Worth died from cholera. Worth was a well respected and decorated U.S. Army General at the time of his death and a hero of three wars. Fort Worth, Texas; Lake Worth, Florida; and Worth County, Georgia are named in his honor. The Trinity River is a river in the state of Texas in the United States. ...


Upon Worth's death, General William S. Harney assumed command of the Department of Texas and ordered Major Ripley S. Arnold to find a new fort site near the West Fork and Clear Fork. On June 6, 1849, Arnold established a camp on the bank of the Trinity River and named the post Camp Worth in honor of General Worth. is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In August 1849 Arnold moved the camp to the North-facing bluff which overlooked the mouth of the Clear Fork of the Trinity River. The U.S. War Department officially named the post Fort Worth on November 14, 1849. is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Although Indian attacks were still a threat in the area, pioneers were already settling near the fort which was flooded the first year and moved to the top of the bluff where the courthouse sits today. No trace of the original fort remains.


The Town

Fort Worth went from a sleepy outpost to a bustling town when it became a stop along the legendary Chisholm Trail, the dusty path where millions of cattle were driven North to market. Fort Worth became the center of the cattle drives, and later, the ranching industry. Its location on the Old Chisholm Trail, helped establish Fort Worth as a trading and cattle center and earned it the nickname "Cowtown." The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ...


During the 1860s Fort Worth suffered from the effects of the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The population dropped as low as 175, and money, food, and supply shortages burdened the residents. Gradually, however, the town began to revive. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ...


By 1872 Jacob Samuels, William Jesse Boaz, and William Henry Davis had opened general stores. The next year Khleber M. Van Zandt established Tidball, Van Zandt, and Company, which became Fort Worth National Bank in 1884.


In 1876 the Texas & Pacific Railway arrived in Fort Worth causing a boom and transformed the Fort Worth Stockyards into a premier cattle industry and in wholesale trade.[4] The arrival of the railroad ushered in an era of astonishing growth for Fort Worth as migrants from the devastated war-torn South continued to swell the population and small, community factories and mills yielded to larger businesses. Newly dubbed the nickname, "Queen City of the Prairies", Fort Worth supplied a regional market via the growing transportation network. The Texas and Pacific Railway Company (known as the T&P) was created by federal charter in 1871 with the purpose of building a southern transcontinental railroad between Marshall, Texas and San Diego, California. ... The Stockyards are located in Fort Worth,Texas north of downtown. ...


Fort Worth became the westernmost railhead and a transit point for cattle shipment. With the city's main focus being on cattle and the railroads, local businessman, Louville Niles, formed the Fort Worth Stockyards Company in 1893. Shortly thereafter, the two biggest cattle slaughtering firms at the time, Armour and Swift, both established operations in the new stockyards.


With the boom times came some problems. Fort Worth had a knack for separating cattlemen from their money. Cowboys took full advantage of their last brush with civilization before the long drive on the Chisholm Trail from Fort Worth up North to Kansas. They stocked up on provisions from local merchants, visited the colorful saloons for a bit of gambling and carousing, then galloped Northward with their cattle and whoop it up again on their way back. The town soon became home to Hell's Half Acre, the biggest collection of bars, dance halls and bawdy houses South of Dodge City, giving Fort Worth the nickname of "The Paris of the Plains." [5] Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans Braxton Bragg Strength 43,400 37,712 Casualties 13,249 (1,730 killed, 7,802 wounded, 3,717 captured/missing) 10,266 (1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded, 1,027 captured/missing) The Battle of Stones River...


Crime was rampant and certain sections of town were off-limits for proper citizens. Shootings, knifings, muggings and brawls became a nightly occurrence. Cowboys were joined by a motley assortment of buffalo hunters, gunmen, adventurers, and crooks. As the importance of Fort Worth as a crossroads and cowtown grew, so did Hell's Half Acre.


What was originally limited to the lower end of Rusk Street (renamed Commerce Street in 1917) spread out in all directions. By 1881 the Fort Worth Democrat was complaining Hell's Half Acre covered more like two-and-half acres.


The Acre grew until it sprawled across four of the city's main North-South thoroughfares. These boundaries, which were never formally recognized, represented the maximum area covered by the Acre, around 1900. Occasionally, the Acre was also referred to as "The bloody Third Ward" after it was designated one of the city's three political wards in 1876.


Long before the Acre reached its maximum boundaries, local citizens had become alarmed at the level of crime and violence in their city. In 1876 Timothy Isaiah (Longhair Jim) Courtright was elected City Marshal with a mandate to tame the Acre's wilder activities.


Courtright cracked down on violence and general rowdiness by sometimes putting as many as 30 people in jail on a Saturday night, but allowed the gamblers to operate unmolested. After receiving information that train and stagecoach robbers, such as the Sam Bass gang, were using the Acre as a hideout, local authorities intensified law-enforcement efforts. Yet certain businessmen placed a newspaper advertisement arguing that such legal restrictions in Hell's Half Acre would curtail the legitimate business activities there.


Despite this tolerance from business, however, the cowboys began to stay away, and the businesses began to suffer. City officials muted their stand against vice. Courtright lost support of the Fort Worth Democrat and consequently lost when he ran for reelection in 1879.


Throughout the 1880s and 1890s the Acre continued to attract gunmen, highway robbers, card sharps, con men, and shady ladies, who preyed on out-of-town and local sportsmen.


At one time or another reform-minded mayors like H. S. Broiles and crusading newspaper editors like B. B. Paddock declared war on the district but with no long-term results. The Acre meant income for the city (all of it illegal) and excitement for visitors. This could possibly be why the reputation of the Acre was sometimes exaggerated by raconteurs which longtime Fort Worth residents claimed the place was never as wild as its reputation.


Suicide was responsible for more deaths than murder, and the chief victims were prostitutes, not gunmen. However much its reputation was exaggerated, the real Acre was bad enough. The newspaper claimed "it was a slow night which did not pan out a cutting or shooting scrape among its male denizens or a morphine experiment by some of its frisky females."


The loudest outcries during the periodic clean-up campaigns were against the dance halls, where men and women met, as opposed to the saloons or the gambling parlors, which were virtually all male.


A major reform campaign in the late 1880s was brought on by Mayor Broiles and County Attorney R. L. Carlock after two events. In the first of these, on February 8, 1887, Luke Short and Jim Courtright had a shootout on Main Street that left Courtright dead and Short the "King of Fort Worth Gamblers." is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...


Although the fight did not occur in the Acre, it focused public attention on the city's underworld. A few weeks later a poor prostitute known only by the name of Sally was found murdered and nailed to an outhouse door in the Acre.


These two events, combined with the first prohibition campaign in Texas, helped to shut down the Acre's worst excesses in 1889. More than any other factor, urban growth began to improve the image of the Acre, as new businesses and homes moved into the South end of town.


Another change was the influx of black residents. Excluded from the business end of town and the nicer residential areas, Fort Worth's black citizens, who numbered some 7,000 out of a total population of 50,000 around 1900, settled into the south end of town. Though some joined in the profitable vice trade (to run, for instance, the Black Elephant Saloon), many others found legitimate work and bought homes.


A third change was in the popularity and profitability of the Acre, which was no longer attracting cowboys and out-of-town visitors. Its visible population was more likely to be derelicts, hoboes, and bums.


By 1900 most of the dance halls and gamblers were gone. Cheap variety shows and prostitution became the chief forms of entertainment. The Progressive era was similarly making its reformist mark felt in districts like the Acre all over the country.


In 1911 Rev. J. Frank Norris launched an offensive against racetrack gambling in the Baptist Standard and used the pulpit of the First Baptist Church to attack vice and prostitution. Norris used the Acre both to scourge the leadership of Fort Worth and to advance his own personal career. When he began to link certain Fort Worth businessmen with property in the Acre and announce their names from his pulpit, the battle heated up.


On February 4, 1912, Norris's church was burned to the ground; that evening his enemies tossed a bundle of burning oiled rags onto his porch, but the fire was extinguished and caused minimal damage. A month later the arsonists succeeded in burning down the parsonage. is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In a sensational trial lasting a month, Norris was charged with perjury and arson in connection with the two fires. He was acquitted, but his continued attacks on the Acre accomplished little until 1917. A new city administration and the federal government, which was eyeing Fort Worth as a potential site for a major military training camp, joined forces with the Baptist preacher to bring down the curtain on the Acre finally.


The police department compiled statistics showing that 50 percent of the violent crime in Fort Worth occurred in the Acre, a shocking confirmation of long-held suspicions. After Camp Bowie was located on the outskirts of Fort Worth in the summer of 1917, martial law was brought to bear against prostitutes and barkeepers of the Acre. Fines and stiff jail sentences curtailed their activities. By the time Norris held a mock funeral parade to "bury John Barleycorn" in 1919, the Acre had become a part of Fort Worth history. The name, nevertheless, continued to be used for three decades thereafter to refer to the depressed lower end of Fort Worth.[6]


Recent History

In 2000, an F2 tornado smashed through downtown, tearing many buildings into shreds and scrap metal. One of the hardest hit structures was Bank One Tower. The 'Plywood Skyscraper' and later 'Tin Can Tower' awaited demolition for several years, deemed as unsafe and too cost-prohibitive to revive. It has since been converted to upscale condominiums and officially renamed 'The Tower'. It caused severe damage to one prominent 70s-era high-rise extensive enough to elicit rejected proposals for demolition.[7] The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita-Pearson scale, rates a tornados intensity by the damage it inflicts on human-built structures and sometimes on vegetation. ... The Fort Worth Tornado occurred on March 28, 2000. ... There are two meanings of condominium In international law, a condominium is a territory in which two sovereign powers have equal rights. ...


When oil began to gush in West Texas, Fort Worth was at the center of the wheeling and dealing. In July 2007, Barnett Shale, much of which lies directly under this city, was being drilled into by natural gas companies paying individuals royalties. [8] July 2007 is the seventh month of that year. ... The Barnett Shale is a geological formation of economic significance. ...


Geography and Climate

Downtown Fort Worth From I-20
Downtown Fort Worth From I-20

Fort Worth is located in northern Texas and the Southwest, and the South portion of the United States. The DFW Metroplex is the hub of the North Texas region. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 774.1 km² (298.9 mi²). 757.7 km² (292.5 mi²) of it is land and 16.4 km² (6.3 mi²) of it (2.12%) is water. Image File history File links FTWORTHTX3223. ... Image File history File links FTWORTHTX3223. ... “I-20” redirects here. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Historic Southern United States. ... North Texas. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


A large storage dam was built in 1913 on the West Fork of the Trinity River, 7 miles (10 km) from the city, with a storage capacity of 30 billion US gallons (110,000,000 ) of water. The lake formed by this dam is known as Lake Worth. The cost of the dam was nearly US$1,500,000 - a handsome sum at the time. The Trinity River is a river in the state of Texas in the United States. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... The cubic metre (symbol m³) is the SI derived unit of volume. ... USD redirects here. ...


Climate

Fort Worth has a humid subtropical climate according to the Köppen climate classification system. The hottest month of the year is July, when the average high temperature is 97°F (36°C), and overnight low temperatures average 72°F (23°C), giving an average temperature of 84°F (29°C)[9]. The coldest month of the year is January, when the average high temperature is 55°F (13°C), and low temperatures average 31°F (-1°C)[9]. The average temperature in January is 43°F (6°C)[9]. The highest temperature ever recorded in Fort Worth is 111°F (44°C), on July 26, 1954[10]. The coldest temperature ever recorded in Fort Worth is -6°F (-21°C), on December 24, 1989[11] Because of its position in North Texas, Fort Worth is very suspectible to supercells, which produces tornadoes. (See recent history above.) Humid subtropical climates are characterized by hot, humid summers and cool to mild winters. ... The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ...


The average annual precipitation for Fort Worth is 34.01 inches (863.8 mm)[9]. The wettest month of the year is May, when 4.58 inches (116.3 mm) of precipitation falls.[9]. The driest month of the year is January, when only 1.70 inches (43.2 mm) of precipitation falls[9] The average annual snowfall in Fort Worth is very light, only 2.6 inches (66.0 mm)[12]


Demographics

Fort Worth's Population by year [13]
Year Pop.
1880 6,663
1890 23,076
1900 26,668
1910 73,312
1920 106,482
1930 163,447
1940 177,662
1950 278,778
1960 356,268
1970 393,476
1980 385,164
1990 447,619
2000 534,694
2006 (est.) 653,320
Downtown Fort Worth at night

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 534,694 people, 195,078 households, and 127,581 families residing in the city. The July 2004 census estimates have placed Fort Worth in the top 20 most populous cities (# 19) in the U.S. with the population at 604,538.[14] Fort Worth is also in the top 5 cities with the largest numerical increase from July 1, 2003 to July 1, 2004 with 17,872 more people or a 3.1% increase. [15] The population density was 705.7/km² (1,827.8/mi²). There were 211,035 housing units at an average density of 278.5/km² (721.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 59.69% White, 20.26% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 2.64% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 14.05% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. 29.81% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 725 KB) Summary Skyline of Fort Worth at night as shot from the west side of the Trinity River. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 725 KB) Summary Skyline of Fort Worth at night as shot from the west side of the Trinity River. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 195,078 households out of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.6% are classified as non-families by the United States Census Bureau. Of 195,078 households, 9,599 are unmarried partner households: 8,202 heterosexual, 676 same-sex male, and 721 same-sex female households. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


28.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.33.


In the city the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 11.3% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.5 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $37,074, and the median income for a family was $42,939. Males had a median income of $31,663 versus $25,917 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,800. About 12.7% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.4% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Fort Worth stands as the ninth-safest U.S. city among those with a population over 500,000 in 2006. [16]

See also: People of Fort Worth

The following are people of note who live or have lived in Fort Worth, Texas. ...

Cityscape

List of neighborhoods in Fort Worth, Texas // East Meadowbrook Polytechnic Heights Stop Six North Northside Riverside Stockyards West Arlington Heights Como Ridglea Western Hills South Berkley Place Bluebonnet Hills Candleridge Colonial/Bellaire Fairmount Mistletoe Heights Overton Park Park Hill Ryan Place South Hills Stonegate Tanglewood TCU Area University Place University West Wedgewood Westcliff Worth Heights Category: ...


Architecture

Downtown

Sundance Square
Sundance Square
Bass Performance Hall
Bass Performance Hall
Fort Worth Water Gardens
Fort Worth Water Gardens
  • Sundance Square - Fort Worth's downtown has Sundance Square, named after the infamous Sundance Kid. Sundance Square is a 16 block entertainment center for the city. The Square has buildings with tall windows, as well as brick-paved streets and sidewalks, and landscaping that many consider to be very delightful. Many restaurants, nightclubs, boutiques, museums, live theatres, cineplex movie theaters, and art galleries are in the Square.
  • Fort Worth Water Gardens - A 4.3 acre/1.74 ha contemporary park, designed by architect Philip Johnson, that features three unique pools of water offering a calming and cooling oasis for downtown patrons. The gardens were used in the finale of the 1970s sci-fi film Logan's Run. (In mid-2004 the Water Gardens had to be closed due to a drowning. It has reopened after preventive measures have been installed.)
  • Fort Worth Convention Center - Includes an 11,200 seat multi-purpose arena.
  • Bass Performance Hall - Bass Hall is the permanent home to the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra, Texas Ballet Theater, Fort Worth Opera, and the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition and Cliburn Concerts.
  • Tarrant County Courthouse

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 874 KB) Summary Nighttime in downtown Fort Worth overlooking Sundance Square. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 874 KB) Summary Nighttime in downtown Fort Worth overlooking Sundance Square. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixels Full resolution (512 × 640 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas on December 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 480 × 600 pixels Full resolution (512 × 640 pixel, file size: 52 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas on December 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (883x509, 214 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (883x509, 214 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Sundance Square is the name of an area in downtown Fort Worth, Texas. ... Harry Alonzo Longabaugh (1867 - c. ... Landscaping refers to any activity that modifies the visible features of an area of land, including but not limited to: living elements, such as flora or fauna; or what is commonly referred to as Gardening efforts in the gestalt, the art and craft of growing plants with a goal of... Fort Worth Water Gardens, built in 1974, is located on the south end of downtown Fort Worth between Houston and Commerce Streets next to the Fort Worth Convention Center. ... 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... Logans Run is a 1976 science fiction film based on the novel of the same name by William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson. ... The Fort Worth Convention Center includes an 11,200-seat multi-purpose arena in Fort Worth, Texas. ... The Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas The Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass Performance Hall in Fort Worth, Texas is located in downtown Fort Worth near Sundance Square, occupies a whole city block, and was opened in 1998. ... Fort Worth Opera is the oldest, continually performing opera company in the state of Texas and among the oldest in the United States. ... The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition was first held in 1962 in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Cliburn playing in the final round of the First International Tchaikovsky Piano Competition Harvey Lavan Cliburn Jr. ... Tarrant County Courthouse; Fort Worth, Texas The Tarrant County Courthouse was designed by firm of Gunn & Curtis and built by the Probst Construction Company of Chicago, 1893-1895. ...

Fort Worth Stockyards Historic District

The stockyards offer a taste of the old west and the Chisholm Trail at the site of the historic cattle drives and rail access. The District is filled with restaurants, clubs, gift shops and attractions such as daily longhorn cattle drives through the streets, historic reenactments, the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame and Billy Bob's, the world's largest country and western music venue. The Stockyards are located in Fort Worth,Texas north of downtown. ... The Chisholm Trail was a route used in the late 19th century in the Western United States for cattle drives, the movement of cattle overland. ... The Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, a museum in Fort Worth, Texas, pays tribute to the cowboys and cowgirls of the Lone Star State. ... Billy Bobs Texas is a popular country & western nightclub on the outskirts of the Fort Worth Stockyards. ...


Cultural district

Fort Worth Texas Modern Art Museum This image is taken from the deck of The Modern, looking over the new reflecting pool towards downtown Fort Worth. ... The famous Church of the Light in Ibaraki-shi, Osaka, Japan The Westin Awaji Island designed by Ando Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Art, Kobe, Japan Image:Ando. ... The Kimbell Art Museum is situated in the Cultural District of Fort Worth, Texas. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... Fra Angelico, (c. ... A young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso, formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 - April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art. ... Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun (April 16, 1755 - March 30, 1842) was a French painter, and is recognized as the most famous woman painter of the eighteenth century. ... Self-Portrait in a Striped T-shirt (1906). ... Vase of Flowers (1876) Oil on canvas Paul Cézanne (January 19, 1839 – October 22, 1906) was a French painter who represents the bridge from impressionism to cubism. ... El Greco (The Greek, 1541 – April 7, 1614) was a painter, sculptor, and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. ... This article is about the Dutch painter. ... Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901/1902 – March 17, 1974) was a world-renowned architect who practiced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Amon Carter Museum is located in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ... Charles Marion Russell (1864, Oak Hill, Missouri – 1926, Great Falls, Montana), also known as C.M. Russell, was one of the great artists of the American West. ... For other persons named Alexander Calder, see Alexander Calder (disambiguation). ... Thomas Cole, ca. ... Photograph of Stuart Davis, 1940 Stuart Davis (December 7, 1894 - June 24, 1964), American painter, was born in Philadelphia to Edward Wyatt Davies and Helen Stuart Davies. ... Self portrait (1902), National Academy of Design, New York. ... Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Georgia Tottoeanocomita OKeeffe (November 15, 1887—March 6, 1986) was an American artist. ... Self Portrait, 1906, oil on canvas, 70 x 53 cm, Uffizi Gallery, Florence. ... He was a loser. ... 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... The National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame is located in Forth Worth, Texas. ... The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History is located in Fort Worth, Texas. ... The Will Rogers Memorial Center is an 85-acre public entertainment and sports complex located in Forth Worth, Texas in the United States. ... From a one-day affair with a few head of cattle tethered under ice-laden shade trees, the Southwestern Exposition and Livestock Show has grown into a three-week extravaganza with international appeal for exhibitors and visitors alike. ...

Parks district

  • Fort Worth Zoo - Ranked one of the top 10 best zoos in the United States.
  • Fort Worth Botanic Garden - The oldest botanic garden in Texas, with 21 specialty gardens and over 2,500 species of plants.
  • Fort Worth Japanese Garden
  • Log Cabin Village - A collection of authentic Texas log cabins dating from the 1850s.
  • Trinity Park - A large park along the Trinity River that includes part of the Trinity Trails system.

The oldest continuous zoo site in Texas, the Fort Worth Zoo was founded in 1909 with one lion, two bear cubs, an alligator, a coyote, a peacock and a few rabbits. ... A Japanese-style wooden arch bridge at the Fort Worth Botanic Garden The Fort Worth Botanic Garden (109 acres) is a botanical garden located at 3220 Botanic Garden Boulevard, Fort Worth, Texas. ... A Japanese-style wooden arch bridge at the Fort Worth Japanese Garden The Fort Worth Japanese Garden is a 7. ... The Trinity River is a river in the state of Texas in the United States. ...

Texas Christian University

  • Texas Christian University - Fort Worth's most prominently known university, founded in 1873 by Addison & Randolph Clark as "AddRan Male & Female College". It is the oldest university affiliated with the Disciples of Christ (Christian Church) religion, though the Disciples of Christ do not own or run the school, rather, the school-church partnership is based on a common heritage and shared values. The university became known as "Texas Christian University" in 1902 and was the first co-educational instiution in the US's southwest region. The school now occupies approximately 325 acres right in the heart of Fort Worth. Originally, 50 acres of land was originally ceeded to the Clark brothers; at the time, the land was dubbed "Hell's Half Acre" due to the red-light business that predominated in the area. In 1895 the plot of land was given free of charge, along with $200,000, to entice the brothers to permanently settle their educational institution in Fort Worth. Over $1.5 million dollars are exclusively endowed each year to ensure the upkeep of the university, which sits as a pristine green/flowered landscape in the middle of the urban surroundings of Fort Worth.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Uptown / Trinity

The Tarrant Regional Water District, City of Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Streams & Valleys Inc, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are cooperating in an effort to develop an area north of "downtown" as "uptown" along the Trinity River. This plan promotes a large mixed use development adjacent to the central city area of Fort Worth, with a goal to prevent urban sprawl by promoting the growth of a healthy, vibrant urban core. The Trinity River Vision lays the groundwork to enable Fort Worth's central business district to double in size over the next 40 years. [6] The Trinity River is a river in the state of Texas in the United States. ...


Other

The Tandy Center Subway operated in Fort Worth, Texas from 1963 to 2002. ... City Place is an outdoor mall which replaced the defunct Long Beach Plaza. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... The Trinity River is a river in the state of Texas in the United States. ... The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) is an agency in the United States Department of the Treasury that primarily prints Federal Reserve notes for the Federal Reserve, but also produces a variety of other government security documents. ... The United States Army Corps of Engineers, or USACE, is a federal agency made up of some 34,600 civilian and 650 military men and women. ... Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base or NAS Fort Worth JRB (IATA: NFW, ICAO: KNFW, FAA LID: NFW) is a US Military Base located five miles west of Fort Worth, Texas. ... Carswell Air Force Base is located in Tarrant County, Texas. ... Logans Run is a 1976 science fiction film based on the novel of the same name by William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Michael Joseph Anderson (b. ... For the American hockey player, see Mike York. ... Fort Worth Water Gardens, built in 1974, is located on the south end of downtown Fort Worth between Houston and Commerce Streets next to the Fort Worth Convention Center. ... The Lathe of Heaven is a 1971 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. ...

Culture

Politics

Cuisine

Arts

Sports and recreation

While much of Fort Worth's sports attention is focused on the Metroplex's professional sports teams, the city does have its own athletic identity. TCU competes in NCAA Division I Athletics, including the football team that is consistently ranked in the Top 25, the baseball team that has competeted in the last three NCAA Tournaments, and the women's basketball team that has competed in the last seven NCAA Tournaments. Texas Wesleyan University competes in the NAIA, and were the 2006 NAIA Div. I Men's Basketball champions and three-time National Collegiate Table Tennis Association (NCTTA) team champions (2004-2006). Fort Worth is also home to the NCAA football Bell Helicopter Armed Forces Bowl as well as four minor-league professional sports teams. One of which, the Fort Worth Cats, were reborn in 2001. The original Cats, who had discontinued in 1960 were a very popular minor league team in Fort Worth dating back to the 19th century (when they were called the Panthers). Texas Christian University features 18 varsity sports teams. ... NAIA is an acronym (or an initialism) that can refer to the following: National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics in the United States. ... The Armed Forces Bowl logo. ...


Professional Sports Teams

Club Sport Founded League Venue
Fort Worth Cats Baseball 2001 AAIPBL LaGrave Field
Fort Worth Flyers Basketball

Fort Worth Cats The Fort Worth Cats are an independent minor league baseball team which plays in Fort Worth, Texas. ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article refers to the modern American Association that started in 2006. ... General information LaGrave Field is a stadium in Fort Worth, Texas. ... The Fort Worth Flyers is the name of a NBA Development League minor league basketball expansion team based in Fort Worth, Texas. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Media

Radio stations

WBAP 820 AM - (News/Talk)


ADZV 87.5 FM K-LOVE (Christian Contemporary, 80's Rock, Religious, Other)


WXCD 87.5 FM KDOL (News/Talk Website)


KNTU 88.1 FM University of North Texas (Jazz, Radio)


KJCR 88.3 FM Southwestern Adventist University (Religious, Radio)


KEOM 88.5 FM Mesquite Independent School District (Oldies, Radio)


KMQX 88.5 FM Power FM - The Christian Rock Station (Christian Contemporary, Radio)


KTCU 88.7 FM Texas Christian University (Variety, Radio)


KETR 88.9 FM Texas A&M University-Commerce (Variety, Radio)


KSQX 89.1 FM Lite Rock Favorites (Adult Contemporary, Radio)


KNON 89.3 FM The Voice of the People (Variety, Radio)


KYQX 89.5 FM Lite Rock Favorites (Nostalgia, Radio)


KVRK 89.7 FM Power FM - The Christian Rock Station (Christian Contemporary, Radio)


KERA 90.1 FM Public TV and Radio for North Texas (Public Radio, Radio)


KCBI 90.9 FM Criswell College (Christian Contemporary, Radio)


KDKR 91.3 FM Solid Bible Teaching, Passionate Praise & Worship (Religious, Radio)


KVTT 91.7 FM (Religious, Radio)


KPFC 91.9 FM Non-commercial Educational Radio Station (Top-40, Radio)


KXEZ 92.1 FM Your Home for Hits from the 50s 60s and 70s (Oldies, Radio)


KZPS 92.5 FM The Classic Rock Station (Classic Rock, Radio)


KMKT 93.1 FM Katy Country - Playing the Best of the New & Gold (Country, Radio)


KDBN 93.3 FM 93.3 The Bone Rocks Harder (Classic Rock, Radio)


KIKT 93.5 FM (Country, Radio)


KNOR 93.7 FM (Hip Hop, Radio)


KLNO 94.1 FM Radio Estereo Latino (Spanish, Radio)


KSOC 94.5 FM 94.5 K-Soul (Urban Contemporary, Radio)


KLTY 94.9 FM Safe for the whole Family (Christian Contemporary, Radio)


KHYI 95.3 FM The Range (Americana/Roots, Radio)


KJKB 95.5 FM Boss 95.5 (Classic Rock, 80's Rock)


KFWR 95.9 FM The Ranch - Authentic, Texas, & Classic Country (Country, Radio)


KSCS 96.3 FM The Country Leader (Country, Radio)


JTMJ 96.7 FM country (Country, Dance, Hip Hop, Top-40)


KTYS 96.7 FM 967 The Twister (Country, Radio)


KEGL 97.1 FM Pure Rock 97.1 The Eagle (Classic Hits, Radio) (No longer exists)


KBFB 97.9 FM 97.9 The Beat - The HipHop Station (Hip Hop, Radio)


KFYZ 98.3 FM (Country, Radio)


KLUV 98.7 FM K-Luv - Oldies Radio (Oldies, Radio)


KFZO 99.1 FM (Spanish, Radio)


KPLX 99.5 FM 99.5 The Wolf - Texas Country - Wolf Radio (Country, Radio)


KNOB 99.9 FM Mineral Wells Community Radio (Variety, Radio)


KJKK 100.3 FM Jack FM ( Mixed rock and pop, retro and current)


Television stations

KXAS - NBC5, KTVT - CBS11, KTXA - Independent KXAS-TV (NBC 5) is a flagship NBC owned and operated station based in Fort Worth. ... KTVT (CBS11) is a CBS owned and operated television station (O&O) in the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas designated market area. ... KTXA, channel 21, is an independent television station based in Fort Worth, Texas, and serving the Dallas/Fort Worth designated market area. ...


Newspapers

Fort Worth has one newspaper published daily, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The Star-Telegram is the forty-fifth most widely circulated newspaper in the United States, with a daily circulation of 210,990 and a Sunday circulation of 304,200. The Fort Worth Star-Telegram is a major U.S. daily newspaper serving Fort Worth and the western half of the North Texas area known as the Metroplex. ...


Weekly Newspapers

The North Texas Journal is a free weekly newspaper distributed around the North Texas and Southern Oklahoma areas. While known in the past as an African-American publication, it has recently taken on a more mainstream audience. In the beginning of 2006, the publisher, Reginald Blow launched its website, The North Texas Journal Online. [7]


Religion

Languages

Events

Image:Convention Center.jpg Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Economy

Companies Headquartered in Fort Worth, USA:
Acme Brick
Alcon (US Headquarters)
AmeriCredit
AMR Corporation
Bell/Agusta Aerospace Company
Bell Helicopter Textron
Ben E. Keith
Bombay Company
Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp.
Carter & Burgess
Concussion, LLP
Consolidated Robotics
Coria Laboratories, Ltd.
Crescent Real Estate Equities Company
Dickies
Dunlaps
D. R. Horton
First Command Financial Planning, Inc.
Funimation Entertainment
Galderma Laboratories (US Headquarters)
Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
RadioShack
Rahr and Sons Brewing Company
RPM
Pier One Imports
SPM Flow Control
TPG Capital, L.P.
TTI, Inc.
XTO Energy
Acme Brick Company is an American manufacturer and distributor of brick and masonry-related construction products and materials. ... Alcon, (NYSE: ACL) headquartered in Hünenberg, Switzerland, is a global medical company specializing in eye care products. ... AmeriCredit Corp. ... AMR Corporation NYSE: AMR is a Fort Worth, Texas-based holding company created in 1982 as part of a reorganization of American Airlines. ... Bell/Agusta Aerospace Company is a joint venture formed in 1998 by Bell Helicopter Textron company, and Agusta (now AgustaWestland, who have collaborated on a variety of products dating back to 1952. ... Bell Helicopter Textron is an American helicopter and tiltrotor manufacturer headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Ben E. Keith is the ninth largest broadline foodservice distributor in the United States. ... The Bombay Company is a Fort Worth, Texas-based furniture and home accessories retailer. ... Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation NYSE: BNI is the parent company of the BNSF Railway (formerly the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway). ... Consolidated Robotics (formerly known as Consolidated Weaponized Robotics) is a manufacturer and distributor of military-grade robots, and one of the chief robotics suppliers of the United States Military. ... Crescent Real Estate Equities Co. ... Dickies logo Williamson-Dickie, more commonly referred to as Dickies, is an American company headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas that manufactures clothing and other accessories. ... Dunlaps, based in Fort Worth, Texas, is a family owned chain of department stores the central and southern United States catering to most classes depending on the location. ... D.R. Horton is a Fortune 200 company that was founded in 1978 in the Dallas/Fort Worth area by Donald R. Horton. ... First Command Financial Planning, Inc. ... FUNimation Entertainment (previously known as FUNimation Productions) is an American entertainment company formed by Gen Fukunaga in the early 1990s to produce, merchandise and distribute anime and other entertainment properties in the United States and international markets. ... Galderma Laboratories is a pharmaceutical company dedicated to skin products and dermatology. ... Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company is a major unit of Lockheed Martin with headquarters at Fort Worth, Texas. ... The exterior of a typical free-standing RadioShack store. ... Rahr and Sons Brewing Company is a microbrewery in Fort Worth, Texas, owned by Fritz and Erin Rahr. ... rpm or RPM may mean: revolutions per minute RPM Package Manager (originally called Red Hat Package Manager) RPM (movie) RPM (band), a Brazilian rock band RPM (magazine), a former Canadian music industry magazine In firearms, Rounds Per Minute: how many shots an automatic weapon can fire in one minute On... Pier 1 Imports Inc. ... TPG Capital, L.P. (formerly Texas Pacific Group, commonly referred as TPG) is a private equity investment firm founded by David Bonderman, James Coulter and William S. Price III in 1992. ... TTI, Inc. ... XTO Energy NYSE: XTO is an American Fortune 500 energy producing company. ...


Transportation

I-20 in southern Fort Worth
I-20 in southern Fort Worth

Image File history File links FTWORTHTX3224. ... Image File history File links FTWORTHTX3224. ... “I-20” redirects here. ... Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, located between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, is the busiest airport in Texas and third busiest airport in the world in terms of operations. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Dallas redirects here. ... Fort Worth Alliance Airport (IATA: AFW, ICAO: KAFW) is located 14 miles (23 km) north of Fort Worth, Texas. ... Fort Worth Meacham International Airport (commonly referred to as Meacham Field) is an airport in Fort Worth, Texas with the IATA airport code FTW and the ICAO airport code KFTW. The airport is located at the intersection of Interstate 820 and U.S. Highway 287 in northwest Fort Worth, near... The Trinity Railway Express (or TRE) is a commuter rail line in the system of mass transit in Dallas and Fort Worth operated by an interlocal agreement between the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) system and The T in Fort Worth. ... Dallas redirects here. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Amtraks Heartland Flyer is a daily train that follows a 206-mile (332-km) route between Fort Worth, Texas and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... The Texas Eagle is a 1306-mile (2102 km) passenger train route operated by Amtrak in the central and western United States. ... The T is the nickname for: Bostons Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Fort Worth, Texass Fort Worth Transportation Authority, and Pittsburghs Port Authority of Allegheny County This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The T is the nickname for: Bostons Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Fort Worth, Texass Fort Worth Transportation Authority, and Pittsburghs Port Authority of Allegheny County This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The following is a list of the freeways and tollways in the Dallas, Texas area: Interstate 20; Interstate highway passing through suburban Fort Worth and Arlington and sparsely populated south Dallas. ...

Education

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ...

Public schools

Most of Fort Worth is served by Fort Worth Independent School District. Fort Worth Independent School District is a school district based in Fort Worth, Texas, United States. ...


Other school districts that serve portions of Fort Worth include:

The portion of Fort Worth within the Arlington Independent School District contains a wastewater plant. No residential areas are in the portion. Azle Independent School District is a public school district based in Azle, Texas. ... The Birdville Independent School District is a K-12 public school district based in Haltom City, Texas (USA). ... Burleson Independent School District is a public school district based in Burleson, Texas. ... Castleberry Independent School District is a public school district based in River Oaks, Texas. ... Crowley Independent School District is a public school district based in Crowley, Texas (USA). ... The Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District is located in the northwest corner of Tarrant County, Texas (USA) and includes 73 square miles of land in Saginaw, Blue Mound and several housing additions in the City of Fort Worth, near Eagle Mountain Lake. ... Everman Independent School District is a public school district based in Everman, Texas. ... Hurst-Euless-Bedford Independent School District is a K-12 public school district in the Fort Worth, TX area. ... The Keller Independent School District is a K-12 public school district based in Keller, Texas. ... Kennedale Independent School District is a public school district based in Kennedale, Texas. ... Lake Worth Independent School District is a public school district based in Lake Worth, Texas. ... Northwest Independent School District is a public school district based in far north Fort Worth, Texas (USA). ... White Settlement Independent School District is a public school district based in White Settlement, Texas. ... Arlington Independent School District or AISD is a school district based in Arlington, Texas (USA). ...


Private High Schools

  • All Saints Episcopal School (K-12)
  • Azle Christian Schools (K-12) (Non-accredited)
  • Colleyville Covenant Christian Academy (PreK-12)
  • Fort Worth Country Day School (K-12)
  • Fort Worth Christian School (K-12)
  • Lake Country Christian School (K-12)
  • Nolan Catholic High School
  • Southwest Christian School (K-12)
  • Trinity Valley School (K-12)
  • Temple Christian School (K-12)
  • Trinity Christian Academy (K-12)
  • Hill School of Fort Worth (2-12)
  • Christian Life Preparatory School (K-12)

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth oversees several Catholic elementary and middle schools.[17] Covenant Christian Academy of Colleyville, Texas was founded in 1979 as a school part of Colleyville Presbyterian Church. ... Fort Worth Country Day School is an independent school in Fort Worth, Texas, a member of the Southwest Preparatory Conference. ... Nolan Catholic High School is the Catholic college preparatory school in the Diocese of Fort Worth administered in the Marianist Tradition. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth was established August 9, 1969, after being part of the Diocese of Dallas for almost 80 years. ...

  • The Katie Brown School for Special Needs (PreK-12)
  • The Nazarene Christian Academy (K-12)

Colleges, Universities, Divinity School, and Theological Seminary

Further information: List of colleges and universities in Fort Worth, Texas

The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex encompasses the metropolitan divisions of Dallas–Plano–Irving and Fort Worth–Arlington, within the state of Texas, USA. The DFW area is home to several institutions of higher learning including: // Argosy University Art Institute of Dallas Christ For The Nations Institute Criswell College Dallas Baptist... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brite Divinity School is affiliated with and located at Texas Christian University. ... The College of Saint Thomas More is a private four year liberal arts Roman Catholic college based in Fort Worth, Texas. ... Tarrant County College (TCC) or Tarrant County College District (TCCD) is a public two year community college serving the Fort Worth area in Tarrant County, Texas and providing degree programs toward an Associate of Arts, an Associate of Applied Science or Associate of Arts in Teaching. ... Texas Wesleyan University is a private college located in the southeast part of Fort Worth, Texas. ... Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, is a private, non-profit institution of higher education, associated with the Southern Baptist Convention, whose stated mission is to provide theological education for individuals engaging in Christian ministry. ... The University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth is a graduate-level institution that is part of the University of North Texas System. ... The University of Texas at Arlington, usually referred to as UT Arlington or UTA, is a nationally recognized comprehensive doctoral/research university classified by Carnegie as Research University - High Activity [2]. The university is located in Arlington, Texas, USA. UT Arlington has a student population of nearly 25,000 and... Texas Wesleyan University is a private college located in the southeast part of Fort Worth, Texas. ...

Sister cities

Fort Worth is a part of the Sister Cities International program and maintains cultural and economic exchange programs with its 7 sister cities. Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Country Italy Region Emilia-Romagna Province Reggio Emilia (RE) Mayor Graziano Delrio (from July 1, 2004) Elevation 58 m Area 231 km² Population  - Total 141,383  - Density 612/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Reggiani Dialing code 0522 Postal code 42100 Frazioni see list Patron San Prospero  - Day... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Nagaoka (長岡市) is a city located in the central part of Niigata Prefecture, Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Trier (French: ; Luxembourgish Tréier) is a city in Germany on the banks of the Moselle River. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Indonesia. ... Nickname: Kota Kembang (City of Flowers) Motto: Bermartabat (dignity) Location of Bandung in Indonesia Coordinates: Province West Java Country Indonesia Government  - Mayor Dada Rosada Area  - City 167. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... This article is about a city in Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Swaziland. ... Location of Mbabane in Swaziland Mbabane, with an estimated population of 70,000 (2003), is the capital of Swaziland. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Population Estimates for the 25 Largest U.S. Cities based on July 1, 2006 Population Estimates (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-6-28.
  2. ^ http://money.cnn.com/2007/06/27/real_estate/fastest_growing_cities/
  3. ^ "America's Most Livable: Fort Worth, TX". Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  4. ^ Fort Worth Stockyards - History. Retrieved 20 November 2006.
  5. ^ [[BIBLIOGRAPHY: Verana E. Berrong, History of Tarrant County: From Its Beginnings until 1875 (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1938). David Ross Copeland, Emerging Young Giant: Fort Worth, 1877-1880 (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1972). Macel D. Ezell, Progressivism in Fort Worth Politics, 1935-38 (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1963). James Farber, Fort Worth in the Civil War (Belton, Texas: Peter Hansborough Bell Press, 1960). Fort Worth Star-Telegram, October 30, 1969. Julia Kathryn Garrett, Fort Worth: A Frontier Triumph (Austin: Encino, 1972). Thomas Albert Harkins, A History of the Municipal Government of Fort Worth, Texas (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1937). Donald Alvin Henderson, Fort Worth and the Depression, 1929-33 (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1937). Delia Ann Hendricks, The History of Cattle and Oil in Tarrant County (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1969). Oliver Knight, Fort Worth, Outpost on the Trinity (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1953). Richard G. Miller, "Fort Worth and the Progressive Era: The Movement for Charter Revision, 1899-1907", in Essays on Urban America, ed. Margaret Francine Morris and Elliot West (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1975). Ruth Gregory Newman, The Industrialization of Fort Worth (M.A. thesis, North Texas State University, 1950). Buckley B. Paddock, History of Texas: Fort Worth and the Texas Northwest Edition (4 vols., Chicago: Lewis, 1922). J'Nell Pate, Livestock Legacy: The Fort Worth Stockyards, 1887-1987 (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1988). Warren H. Plasters, A History of Amusements in Fort Worth from the Beginning to 1879 (M.A. thesis, Texas Christian University, 1947). Leonard Sanders, How Fort Worth Became the Texasmost City (Fort Worth: Amon Carter Museum, 1973). Robert H. Talbert, Cowtown-Metropolis: Case Study of a City's Growth and Structure (Fort Worth: Texas Christian University, 1956). Joseph C. Terrell, Reminiscences of the Early Days of Fort Worth (Fort Worth, 1906). Mack H. Williams, In Old Fort Worth: The Story of a City and Its People as Published in the News-Tribune in 1976 and 1977 (1977). Mack H. Williams, comp., The News-Tribune in Old Fort Worth (Fort Worth: News-Tribune, 1975). Janet Schmelzer]].
  6. ^ [[BIBLIOGRAPHY: Fort Worth Daily Democrat, April 10, 1878 April 18, 1879 July 18, 1881. Oliver Knight, Fort Worth, Outpost on the Trinity (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1953). Leonard Sanders, How Fort Worth Became the Texasmost City (Fort Worth: Amon Carter Museum, 1973). Richard F. Selcer, Hell's Half Acre: The Life and Legend of a Red Light District (Fort Worth: Texas Christian University Press, 1991). F. Stanley [Stanley F. L. Crocchiola], Jim Courtright (Denver: World, 1957). Richard F. Selcer ]]
  7. ^ Kenuhl.com - Personal Account of tornado. Retrieved on 17 April 2006.
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ a b c d e f Average and record temperatures and precipitation, Fort Worth, Texas, The Weather Channel. [2]
  10. ^ Daily and average temperatures for July, Fort Worth, Texas, The Weather Channel. [3]
  11. ^ Daily and average temperatures for December, Fort Worth, Texas, The Weather Channel. [4]
  12. ^ Average annual snowfall by month, NOAA. [5]
  13. ^ United States Census Bureau - Fort Worth population in 1880 (pg.45), 1890 (pg.57), 1900 (pg.4), 1910 (pg.3), 1920 (pg.79), 1930 (pg.69), 1940 (pg.115), 1950 (pg.107), 1960 (pg.23), 1970 (pg.13), 1980 (pg.39), 1990 (pg.114), 2000, 2005 estimate. Retrieved 20 November 2006.
  14. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  15. ^ United States Census Bureau - Port St. Lucie, Fla., is Fastest-Growing City, Census Bureau Says." Published 30 June 2005. Retrieved 20 November 2006.
  16. ^ Morgan Quitno Awards. America's Safest Cities Ranked
  17. ^ The Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth - Catholic Schools. Retrieved 20 November 2006.

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Fort Worth: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (2720 words)
Fort Worth is the fifth-largest city in the state of Texas and the 19th-largest in the United States.
Fort Worth is also in the top 5 cities with the largest numerical increase from July 1, 2003 to July 1, 2004 with 17,872 more people or a 3.1% increase.
Fort Worth is a part of the Sister Cities International program and maintains cultural and economic exchange programs with its 7 sister cities.
Fort Worth, Texas (1000 words)
The Fort Worth to Yuma, AZ, stage line was started in 1850, and the town that grew up became the seat of Tarrant County in 1860.
Today Fort Worth is one of the state's major cities with a wide range of industries including Lockheed, American Airlines, and Burlington Northern.
fort Worth calls itself the "Museum Capital of the southwest" and is known for an outstanding group of museums, plus a season of summer musicals, winter theater, symphony concerts, opera, ballet, and art galleries.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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