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Encyclopedia > Fort Tryon Park
The Park in late March 2007
The Park in late March 2007
Fort Tryon
Fort Tryon

Fort Tryon Park is a public park located in the Washington Heights neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan, USA, 40°51.7′N 73°56′W. It is situated on a 67-acre (270,000 m²) ridge in Upper Manhattan, with a commanding view of the Hudson River, the George Washington Bridge, the New Jersey Palisades and the Harlem River. It is also site of The Cloisters, a branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to medieval art and culture, and home to the Unicorn Tapistries, The Cloisters incorporates several medieval buildings that were purchased in Europe, brought to the United States, and reassembled, often stone by stone. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1025 × 768 pixel, file size: 559 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took the picture. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (1025 × 768 pixel, file size: 559 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took the picture. ... Download high resolution version (486x648, 187 KB)Fort Tryon Park, New York City Photo taken September 4, 2004 by James Berlin, who gave permission for upload to Wikipedia under Gnu Free Documentation License. ... Download high resolution version (486x648, 187 KB)Fort Tryon Park, New York City Photo taken September 4, 2004 by James Berlin, who gave permission for upload to Wikipedia under Gnu Free Documentation License. ... Nagle Avenue Washington Heights is a New York City neighborhood in the northern reaches of the borough of Manhattan. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... The Five Boroughs of New York City: 1: Manhattan 2: Brooklyn 3: Queens 4: Bronx 5: Staten Island In New York City, a borough is a unique form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city; it differs significantly from other borough forms of... The Borough of Manhattan, highlighted in yellow, lies between the East River and the Hudson River. ... Upper Manhattan is an area in New York City consisting of the thin, northern neck of the island of Manhattan. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... For the bridge in New York that crosses the Harlem River, see Washington Bridge. ... Palisades is also a general term for steep cliffs next to a river. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ... The Cloisters as seen from the Hudson River The Cloisters is one of the museums of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... Metropolitan Museum of Art New York Elevation The Metropolitan Museum of Art, often referred to simply as The Met, is one of the worlds largest and most important art museums. ... Byzantine monumental Church mosaics are a crowning glory of Medieval Art. ... The Hunt of the Unicorn is a series of seven tapestries dating from 1495–1505. ...


The park was the site of the American Revolutionary War Battle of Fort Washington, fought on November 16, 1776, between 2,900 American soldiers and 8,000 invading Hessian troops hired by Great Britain[1]. Margaret Corbin became the first woman to fight in the war and was wounded during the battle. After the British won, the fortification was named after Sir William Tryon, the last British Governor of the New York colony. Combatants American Revolutionaries French Monarchy Dutch Republic Spanish Empire Oneida and Tuscarora tribes Polish volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Hessian mercenaries Iroquois Confederacy Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert du Motier Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz Kościuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben Sir William... Combatants United States Britain Hessian Army Commanders George Washington Robert Magaw William Howe Wilhelm Knyphausen Strength 2,900 8,000 Casualties 53 killed, 96 wounded, & 2,818 captured 78 killed, 374 wounded Fort Washington was a fort located at the upermost tip of Manhattan, New York overlooking the Hudson River... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The term Hessian refers to the inhabitants of the German state of Hesse. ... Margaret Corbin (November 12, 1751 - January 16, 1800) was the first woman to fight in the American Revolutionary War. ... William Tryon (January 27, 1729 to 1788) was colonial governor of the Province of North Carolina (1765-1771) and the Province of New York (1771-1780, though he did not retain much power in the colony beyond 1777). ... This is a list of colonial governors during British rule: See also a list of governors since 1777: List of Governors of New York Category: ...


Later it became the private residence of a succession of wealthy owners, including Dr. Samuel Watkins, founder of Watkins Glen, General Daniel Butterfield, Boss Tweed and C. K. G. Billings. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. purchased the Billings estate in 1917. He hired Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., son of the designer of Central Park, to plan a park that he would give to the city. The park was constructed during the Great Depression, providing many jobs. The project included the 190th Street subway station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line (which is the closest station to the park). The park was completed in 1935. Olmstead included extensive flower plantings, including a Heather Garden that was restored in the 1980s. Besides the gardens and the Cloisters, the park has extensive walking paths and meadows, with views of the Hudson and Harlem Rivers. Watkins Glen is a village located in Schuyler County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the village had a total population of 2,149. ... Daniel Adams Butterfield (October 31, 1831 – July 17, 1901) was a New York businessman, a Union general in the American Civil War, and Assistant U.S. Treasurer in New York. ... 1869 Tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed. ... John D. Rockefeller Jr. ... Federick Law Olmsted, Jr. ... Frederick Law Olmsted, oil painting by John Singer Sargent, 1895, Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina Daniel France (September, 1988 was a United States landscape architect, famous for designing many well-known urban parks, including Central Park and Prospect Park in New York City, the countrys oldest coordinated system of... A Central Park landscape Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ... The Great Depression was a time of economic downturn, which started after the Stock Market Crash on October 29, 1929, also known as Black Tuesday. ... 190th Street (originally 190th Street-Overlook Terrace), located on Fort Washington Avenue, about 200 yards (meters) north of 190th Street, has two tracks and two side platforms. ... A 1941 view of a sign for the Eighth Avenue Subway The Eighth Avenue Line is the original rapid transit line of the Independent Subway System (IND), now run by the New York City Transit Authority as part of the New York City Subway system. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and New Jersey. ... The Harlem River, shown in red, between the Bronx and Manhattan in New York City The Harlem River is a tidal strait in New York City, USA that flows 8 miles (13 km) between the East River and the Hudson River, separating the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. ...


The park is built on a formation of Manhattan schist and contains interesting examples of igneous intrusions and of glacial striations from the last Ice Age. The lower lying regions to the east and north of the park are built on Inwood marble. Sample of Manhattan schist The Manhattan schist is a formation of mica schist rock that underlies much of the island of Manhattan in New York City. ... Devils Tower, an igneous intrusion exposed when the surrounding softer rock eroded away. ... Bodybuilding In bodybuilding, striations are the tiny grooves of muscle across major muscle groups characteristic of a well-developed body. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Venus de Milo, front. ...


Abandoned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation in the 1970s, Fort Tryon became a haven for the homeless, prostitutes, and drug dealers. In 1995, the New York Restoration Project, an organization founded by Bette Midler, took over the park, cleaning it up and returning it to its original glory. The New York City Department of Parks and Recreation is the branch of government of the City of New York responsible for maintaining the citys parks system, preserving and maintaining the ecological diversity of the citys natural areas, and furnishing recreational opportunities for citys residents. ... Bette Davis Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress, and comedian, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ...


Parts of the Clint Eastwood film Coogan's Bluff (including the final chase scene) were filmed in Fort Tryon Park. Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Motion picture Coogans Bluff is the title of a 1968 film starring Clint Eastwood and directed by Don Siegel. ...


Remnants of C. K. G. Billings estate are the red-brick pathways (partially paved-over) which are found near the entrance at Margaret Corbin Circle (190th Street and Ft. Washington Avenue), and continues down to the massively arched structure (originally a driveway) which continues down to the highway.[2] Margaret Corbin (November 12, 1751 - January 16, 1800) was the first woman to fight in the American Revolutionary War. ...


References

  1. ^ Washington Heights & Inwood Online: Battle of Fort Washington, accessed September 28, 2006
  2. ^ Christopher Gray, Monumental Remnant From a 1900's Estate, New York Times, Dec. 22, 1996, p. R5. This article includes pictures of the Billings mansion and a contemporaneous photo of the arched structure.

September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Source

  • A Guide to Fort Tryon Park and the Heather Garden, City of New York, Parks & Recreation Department.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Springtime in Fort Tryon Park, NYC (610 words)
Fort Tryon Park is one of the most beautiful public parks of America -- landscaped with trees, lawns, terraces, rock gardens, paved walks, and many benches, all cleverly ordered in harmonious composition.
At the sourthern entrance to the park, near Fort Washington Aveune, a large sloping rock garden forms an approach to the stone ramparts marking the site of old Fort Tryon, built in the summer of 1776 and taken in the fall of the same year by the Hessians.
Margaret Corbin was a hero of the American Revolution; her particular act of bravery was to stand firm against a Hessian advance on one of the hills in the Park.
Fort Tryon Park - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (434 words)
It is situated on a 67 acre (270,000 m²) ridge in northern Manhattan, with a commanding view of the Hudson River, the George Washington Bridge, the Palisades and the Harlem River.
The park is built on a formation of Manhattan mica schist and contains interesting examples of igneous intrusions and of glacial striations from the last Ice Age.
The lower lying regions to the east and north of the park are built on Inwood marble.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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