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Encyclopedia > Fort Ticonderoga
Fort Ticonderoge
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Fort Ticonderoga as seen from Lake Champlain
Location: Ticonderoga, NY
Nearest city: Burlington, VT
Coordinates: 43°50′29″N 73°23′17″W / 43.84139, -73.38806Coordinates: 43°50′29″N 73°23′17″W / 43.84139, -73.38806
Area: 21,950 acres (87.0 km²)
Built/Founded: 1755
Architect: Marquis De Lotbiniere
Designated as NHL: October 9, 1960 [1]
Added to NRHP: October 15, 1966 [2]
NRHP Reference#: 66000519
Governing body: Private museum
U.S. 1955 postage stamp depicting Ethan Allen and Fort Ticonderoga.
U.S. 1955 postage stamp depicting Ethan Allen and Fort Ticonderoga.

Fort Ticonderoga is a large eighteenth-century fort built at a strategically important narrows in Lake Champlain where a short traverse gives access to the north end of Lake George in the state of New York, USA. The fort controlled both commonly used trade routes between the English-controlled Hudson River Valley and the French-controlled Saint Lawrence River Valley. The name "Ticonderoga" comes from an Iroquois word tekontaró:ken, meaning "it is at the junction of two waterways".[3] Fort Ticonderoga was the site of four battles over the course of 20 years. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ticonderoga1. ... Ticonderoga is a town located in Essex County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,167. ... This article is about the state. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... u. ... u. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... For other uses, see Ethan Allen (disambiguation). ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York, USA. The lake extends about 32. ... This article is about the state. ... , The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican, the Great Mohegan by the Iroquois,[1][2][3] or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, Θkahnéhtati[4] in Tuscarora), is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and... a broat veiew of the St LAwrence River, with a Quebec City on a background The Saint Lawrence River (In French: fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large south west-to-north east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Insert non-formatt#REDIRECT [[stinky]]ed text here Pre-European contact distribution of the Iroquoian languages. ...

Contents

History

Construction

A view of the restored Fort Ticonderoga, now an early American military history museum.
A view of the restored Fort Ticonderoga, now an early American military history museum.

In 1755, the French began construction of Fort Carillon(Fort Ticonderoga). The name "Carillon" poop of a former French officer of Spanish descent, Pierre de Carrion, who established a trading post at the site in the late 17th century. Construction proceeded on the fort slowly through 1756 and 1757. The fort's primary goal was to control the south end of Lake Champlain and to prevent the British from getting a toe hold on the lake. king george had a daughter named samatha 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1757 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Ticonderoga during the French and Indian War

In 1757 the French launched a very successful attack upon Fort William Henry from the nearly complete Fort Carillon. For other battles at Fort Ticonderoga, see Battle of Ticonderoga. ... The Battle of Ticonderoga of 1758 was an engagement of the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years War not so much a battle as an investment. ... The British Fort William Henry on the shores of Lake George, New York (NY), was built during the French and Indian War (1754-1763) by Sir William Johnson as a staging ground for attacks against the French Fort Carillon (later renamed Fort Ticonderoga). ...


The garrison of the Fort was by Regiment de la Reine. For an account of the regiment at Fort Ticonderoga see the following link: [1].


On July 8, 1758 the British, under General James Abercrombie, staged a frontal attack against hastily assembled works outside the fort's main walls (which were still under construction) in the Battle of Carillon. Abercrombie tried to move rapidly against the few French defenders, opting to forgo field cannon, he relied upon his 16,000 troops. The British were soundly defeated by 4,000 French defenders. This battle gave the fort a reputation for invulnerability, although the fort never again repulsed an attack. The 42nd Regiment of Foot (the Black Watch) was especially badly mauled in the attack on Fort Carillon, giving rise to a legend involving the Scottish Major Duncan Campbell. is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1758 (MDCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Abercrombie or Abercromby (1706 – April 23, 1781) was a British General and commander of forces in America during the French and Indian War who met with disaster in the Battle of Carillon (1758). ... The Battle of Carillon was fought at Fort Carillon (later known as Fort Ticonderoga), on the shore of Lake Champlain in what was then the British colony of New York, July 7-July 8, 1758 during the French and Indian War, and resulted in a victory of the French garrison... The 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army. ... Duncan Campbell was a Scots nobleman who died on July 18, 1758, as a result of wounds received in an unsuccessful frontal attack against French forces at Fort Carillon (renamed Fort Ticonderoga when the British took the fort a year later). ...


The terrifying reputation of the Native Americans, for the most part allied to the French, is thought to have provoked the wave of panic that apparently overtook British troops retreating in great disorder by day's end. French patrols later found equipment strewn about, boots left stuck in mud, and many wounded on their stretchers left to die in clearings. In fact, few Natives were actually present during the battle, a large contingent of them having been sent by French governor Vaudreuil on a useless mission to Corlar. The misdirection of Indian fighters gave Montcalm all the more reason to pester at his rival Vaudreuil, complaining that his actions had cost them the opportunity to completely destroy the retreating British (who would later regroup south of Lake George). This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Pierre François de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil-Cavagnal (22 November 1698 – 4 August 1778) was a Canadian-born French colonial governor in the Americas. ... Portrait of Montcalm Image of Montcalm leading his troops by Toronto printer Ralph Clark Stone. ...


The fort was captured the following year by the British, under General Jeffrey Amherst, in the Battle of Ticonderoga. Jeffrey Amherst by Joshua Reynolds Jeffrey Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst (sometimes spelled Geoffrey, he himself spelled his name as Jeffery) (January 29, 1717 - August 3, 1797) served as an officer in the British army Born in Sevenoaks, England, he became a soldier aged about 14. ... The Battle of Ticonderoga of 1758 was an engagement of the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years War not so much a battle as an investment. ...


The fort during the American Revolution

Ethan Allen demanding that the fort be surrendered.
Ethan Allen demanding that the fort be surrendered.

No longer considered a "front line" fortification, Ticonderoga was not well-maintained by the Crown and manned by a token force. On May 10, 1775, the British garrison of 22 soldiers was surprised by a small force of Vermonters who called themselves the Green Mountain Boys, and were led by Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold, who entered the fort through a breach in the wall. Allen was known for saying, "Come out you old Rat!" to the English soldiers . Allen later claimed that he demanded to the British commandant that he surrender the fort "In the name of the Great Jehovah and the Continental Congress!"; however, his surrender demand was made to a junior officer, not the commandant, and no other witnesses remembered Allen uttering such a phrase.[4] Not a single shot was fired. The colonies obtained a large supply of cannons and powder, much of which was hauled 300 km by Henry Knox during the winter of 1775-1776, to Boston, to support the Siege of Boston. The fort itself was marginally defensible, but at least provided shelter and an excellent view of the surrounding waterways. The Battle of Ticonderoga was a minor event of the American Revolutionary War. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Green Mountain Boys was historically, the militia of the Vermont Republic. ... For other uses, see Ethan Allen (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Benedict Arnold, see Benedict Arnold (disambiguation). ... Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Boston redirects here. ... Combatants New England militia, Continental Army Great Britain Commanders Artemas Ward, George Washington Thomas Gage, William Howe Strength 17,000 The Siege of Boston (April 19, 1775 – March 17, 1776) was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War, in which New England militiamen—and then the Continental Army—surrounded...


In 1775, the British returned from Canada and moved down Lake Champlain under General Carleton. A ramshackle fleet of American gunboats delayed the British until winter threatened (see: Battle of Valcour Island), but the attack resumed the next year under General Burgoyne. Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ... Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester. ... The Battle of Valcour Island, 11 October 1776, also known as Battle of Valcour Bay, was a naval engagement fought on Lake Champlain in a narrow strait between the New York mainland and Valcour Island. ... General John Burgoyne (February 24, 1722 – August 4, 1792) was a British army officer, politician and dramatist. ...


Ticonderoga's role in the Saratoga Campaign

In 1777 the British forces moving south from Canada drove the Americans back into the fort, then hauled cannon to the top of undefended Mount Defiance, which overlooked the fort. Combatants Great Britain United States Commanders John Burgoyne General Arthur St. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Mount Defiance is an 853 ft (260 m) high hill on the New York side of Lake Champlain, in the North Eastern United States. ...

"Where a goat can go, a man can go; and where a man can go, he can drag a gun"
- Maj. Gen. William Phillips, as his men brought cannon to the top of Mt. Defiance in 1777 William Phillips (1731-1781) was an Artilleryman and General Officer in the British Army who served as a Major General in the American Revolutionary War. ...

Faced with bombardment, Arthur St. Clair ordered Ticonderoga abandoned on July 5, 1777. Burgoyne's troops moved in the next day. Portrait of St. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The colonials quickly withdrew across the Lake to Fort Independence on the Vermont side of the Lake. They soon abandoned that fort as well and retreated south to Saratoga. Seth Warner, now the leader of Vermont Republic's Green Mountain Boys, having conducted the American rear guard the previous year as the Americans retreated from Quebec to Ticonderoga, showed his prowess and cool headedness by very nearly defeating the pursuing British. The rear guard led by Americans Warner, Francis and Titcomb demonstrated significant effectiveness in this defensive maneuver. Warner almost certainly would have defeated the larger British force had it not been for the arrival of the flanking German troops sent by Burgoyne. This rear guard is known as the skirmish at Hubbardton and ultimately allowed Maj. Gen. Arthur St. Clair to retreat to Saratoga with the majority of the Ticonderoga force. This set up the ultimate defeat of Burgoyne later that year in Saratoga. In total 67% of Warner's troops made it through the rear guard battle and effectively stopped the British pursuit. Fort Independence is a fort in Missouri, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Bennington Battle Monument with the statue of Seth Warner in front Seth Warner (May 17, 1743 - December 26, 1784) was born in Roxbury, Connecticut. ... Flag of Vermont Republic The Vermont Republic was an independent republic that existed from 1777 until it became the state of Vermont—the 14th state of the United States of America—in 1791. ... The Green Mountain Boys was historically, the militia of the Vermont Republic. ...


Abandonment of the fort

After Burgoyne's defeat at Saratoga, the fort at Ticonderoga became increasingly irrelevant. The British abandoned Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point in 1780. Local farmers began stripping building materials, such as dressed stone, from the old forts. Also, the climate in the area caused considerable freezing and thawing, with resulting buckling of stone walls. Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The fort is privately owned and was restored in 1909. It is maintained as a tourist attraction, opening for the season on May 10th every year, closing in late October. Re-enactments of the French and Indian War period are held annually. Since it is privately owned and is very well-maintained, the federal government has never tried to make the fort a part of the National Park System, though it can be surmised (and would probably be publicly demanded) that the government would take over the site should any unforeseen economic situations occur. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...


The fort was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960[1] Included in the landmarked area are three land masses, including on promontory across Lake Champlain from the fort, in Vermont.[5] This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...


Legacy

Its role in early American history led to five different U.S. Navy vessels and two classes of warship to be named after it. The ships named USS Ticonderoga commemorate the capture of Fort Ticonderoga on 10 May 1775 by Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. ...


The town of Ticonderoga, New York, located on Lake George in the area where the fort stands, also carries its name. Ticonderoga is a town located in Essex County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,167. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Fort Ticonderoga. National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved on 2007-09-13.
  2. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).
  3. ^ Afable, Patricia O. and Madison S. Beeler (1996). "Place Names", in "Languages", ed. Ives Goddard. Vol. 17 of Handbook of North American Indians, ed. William C. Sturtevant. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution, p. 193
  4. ^ Boller, Jr., Paul F.; George, John (1989). They Never Said It: A Book of Fake Quotes, Misquotes, and Misleading Attributions. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-505541-1. 
  5. ^ Charles H. Ashton and Richard W. Hunter (August, 1983), National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Fort Ticonderoga / Mount Independence National Historic LandmarkPDF (425 KiB), National Park Service  and Accompanying 40 photos, from 1983, 1967, and 1980.PDF (287 KiB)

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

See also

The Battle on Snowshoes refers to two separate military engagements during the French and Indian War. ... Ticonderoga class cruiser is a class of warships in the US Navy, first ordered and authorized in FY 1978. ...

Gallery

External links


Coordinates: 43°50′32″N, 73°23′15″W HABS photograph: First Bank of the United States, Philadelphia HABS drawing: James Madisons Montpelier HAER photograph: Tacoma Narrows Bridge HALS drawing: Hale O Pi Ilani Heiau, Maui This article is about the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), a program of the U.S. National Park Service. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Flag History  - Established 1604  - English conquest 1713 Acadia (1754) Acadia (in the French language lAcadie) was the name given to a colonial territory in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day New England, stretching as far south as Philadelphia. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... The History of Newfoundland and Labrador starts with two separate regions, the Colony of Newfoundland and the region of Labrador, then converge after 1946, with the creation of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... For other uses, see Cape Breton. ... Image File history File links LouisXIV.gif‎ Pavillon de Louis XIV File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New France History of Quebec Monarchy in Quebec ... The Habitation at Port-Royal is a National Historic Site located at Port Royal in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... // Quebec City was founded on July 3, 1608 by Samuel de Champlain. ... Location City Information Established: January 1, 2002 Area: 228. ... View of Montreal from Mount Royal, 1784 Rue Saint-Dominique, 1866 Lachine Canal, 1875 The human history of Montreal, located in Quebec, Canada, spans some 8,000 years and started with the Algonquin, Huron, and Iroquois tribes of North America. ... French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac founded a fort and settlement at the site of Detroit in 1701. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Fortress of Louisbourg: Siege of 1758. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces its development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. ... Panorama of Placentia. ... Fort Rouillé was a French trading post located in Toronto, Ontario, which was established around 1750 but abandoned in 1759. ... Fort Michilimackinac was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading post in the Great Lakes of North America. ... Fort de Chartres existed as a succession of three French fortifications built during the 1700s on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the area of upper Louisiana known as the Illinois Country. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Fort Ticonderoga is a large 18th century fort built at a strategically important narrows in Lake Champlain where a short traverse gives access to the north end of Lake George in the state of New York, USA. The fort controlled both commonly used trade routes between the English-controlled Hudson... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... This is a list of all Forts built by the French government or French Chartered companies in what later became Canada and the United States. ... Governor General of New France was the vice-regal post in New France from 1663 until 1763. ... New France was governed by three rulers: the governor, the bishop and the intendant, all appointed by the King, and sent from France. ... The Sovereign Council of New France was a political body appointed by the King of France and consisting of a Governor General, an intendant and a bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Diocese of Quebec is the oldest Catholic see in the New World north of Mexico. ... This is a list of governors of Montreal. ... Categories: Canadian history | Acadia | Canadian historical figures ... This is a list of viceroys for the colony, dominion and province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... This is a list of the governors of Louisiana, from acquisition by the United Sates in 1803 to the present day; for earlier governors of Louisiana see List of colonial governors of Louisiana. ... The title of intendant (French: , Spanish intendente) has been used in a number of countries through history. ... Admiralty courts, also known as maritime courts, are courts exercising jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries and offences. ... Provost is from the Latin praepositus (set over, from praeponere, to place in front). It may mean: Provost (religion), a church official. ... An ecclesiastical court (also called Court Christian) is any of certain courts having jurisdiction mainly in spiritual or religious matters. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Bailiff (from Late Latin bajulivus, adjectival form of bajulus) is a governor or custodian (cf. ... Marshal (also sometimes spelled marshall in American English, but not in British English) is a word used in several official titles of various branches of society. ... The Code noir (French language: The Black Code), was a decree passed by Frances King Louis XIV in 1689. ... The seigneurial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land distribution used in the colonies of New France. ... The 1666 census of New France was the first census conducted in Canada (and indeed in North America). ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... The Company of One Hundred Associates was a business enterprise created at a time when all territories explored by the French and seized as a part of the French colonial empire were the property of the King of France. ... Antoine Crozat, Marquis du Chatel (Toulouse, ca. ... For the later land company, see Mississippi Land Company. ... The Compagnie de lOccident was a French Crown corporation that existed from 1664 to 1667. ... Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852) Habitants is the name used to referred to the French settlers who established a colony in the Haudenosaunee First Nations territory along the shores of the St. ... The Kings Daughters (in French: filles du roi, filles du roy) were between 700 and 900 Frenchwomen (accounts vary as to the exact numbers) who immigrated to New France (now part of Canada) between 1663 and 1673 under the monetary sponsorship of Louis XIV, as an attempt to rectify... A coureur de bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mestizo. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ... The French and Iroquois Wars (also called the Iroquois Wars or the Beaver Wars) commonly refer to a brutal series of conflicts fought in the mid-17th century in eastern North America. ... Deportation of Acadians order, read by Winslow in Grand-Pré church The Great Upheaval, also known as the Great Expulsion, The Deportation, the Acadian Expulsion, or to the deportees, Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced population transfer or ethnic cleansing of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755... The Great Peace of Montreal was a peace treaty between New France and 39 First Nations of North America. ... Early in 1690, a party of over 200 French and Sault and Algonquin Indian raiders set out from Montreal to attack English outposts to the south. ... The Deerfield massacre occurred during Queen Annes War on February 29, 1704, when joint French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English (predominantly puritan) settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts at dawn, razing the town and killing fifty-six colonists. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... -1... Quebec has played a special role in Canadian history; it is the site where French settlers founded the colony of Canada (New France) in the 1600s and 1700s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... The term French West Indies (see also Antilles françaises) refers to the two French overseas departments of Guadeloupe and Martinique. ... The Carib Expulsion took place in 1660. ... The slave trade in Africa has existed for thousands of years. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The History of the National Register of Historic Places began in 1966 when the United States government passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which created the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). ... Clockwise from bottom left: a site, a building, a structure and an object. ... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... Image File history File links US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo. ... This is a list of entries on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ...

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Fort Tours | Fort Ticonderoga (824 words)
Fort Ticonderoga was built by the French from 1755-1758 as Fort Carillon located above the narrow choke-point between Lake Champlain and Lake George, which controlled the major north-south inland water "highway" during the 18th century.
Due to this strategic location the Fort was the "key to the continent" as the superpowers of the 18th century, the French and the British, contested for empire in North America.
In 1820, William Ferris Pell purchased the ruins of the Fort and the surrounding land to preserve it for posterity.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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