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Encyclopedia > Fort Ouiatenon

Fort Ouiatenon was the first fortified European settlement in what is now called Indiana, located approximately three miles southwest of modern-day West Lafayette. Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 38th 94,321 km² 225 km 435 km 1. ... West Lafayette is a city located in Tippecanoe County, Indiana. ...


Fort Ouiatenon was originally constructed by the French government in 1717 as a military outpost to protect against Great Britain’s western expansion. Its location among the unsettled woodlands of the Wabash River valley also made it a key center of trade for fur trappers. French merchants and trappers from Quebec would arrive at Fort Ouiatenon in search of beaver pelts and to take advantage of trade relations with the native Wea Indian tribes. // Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance February 26-March 6 What is now the northeastern United States was paralyzed by a series of blizzards that buried the region. ... The Wabash River is a 475 mi (765 km) long river in the eastern United States that flows southwest from northwest Ohio near St. ... // Indian trade The fur trade (also called the Indian trade) was a huge part of the early history of contact in North America between European-Americans and American Indians (now often called Native Americans in the United States and First Nations in Canada). ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 2nd 1,542,056 km² 1,183,128 km² 176,928... Species C. canadensis C. fiber Beavers are semi-aquatic rodents native to North America and Europe. ... The Wea were a Native American tribe of the Ohio Country, sometimes considered a subdivision of the Miami tribe. ...


At its peak level of activity during the mid-18th century Fort Ouiatenon was home to over 2,000 residents. In 1761, during the French and Indian War, a contingent of British soldiers led by Lieutenant Edward Jenkins captured and occupied the fort. During Pontiac's Rebellion in 1763, American Indians surprised Lieutenant Jenkins and his men and captured Fort Ouiatenon without firing a shot. Seven similar posts were also captured in the widespread Indian uprising against the British presence. 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The French and Indian War is the common American name for the decisive nine-year conflict (1754–1763) in North America between the Kingdom of Great Britain and its North American Colonies against France and its North American Colonies, which was one of the theatres of the Seven Years War. ... Pontiacs Rebellion was a war launched in 1763 by Native Americans who were dissatisfied with British rule in the Great Lakes region and the Ohio Country after the British victory in the French and Indian War. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... An Atsina named Assiniboin Boy Native Americans in the United States (also known as Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are the indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States and their descendants in...


The British made little use of Fort Ouiatenon after the French and Indian War; it was never garrisoned. During the 1780s local Indian tribes used it as a base of operations to stage raids against American settlers pushing westward. Consequently President George Washington ordered the fort to be destroyed in 1791. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783, and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected, unanimously, twice and remained in from... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1930 a "replica" of Fort Ouiatenon was built near its original site by a local physician named Richard Wetherill. Dr. Wetherill's blockhouse was actually patterned after a British Fort (using horizontal logs)and does not match the style or type of construction of the original Fort Ouiatenon (with vertical logs). The "replica" blockhouse has become historic in its own right, even though it does not represent the original fort building. In 1970 the site was placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Today Fort Ouiatenon is open to tourists and is the location of the annual Feast of the Hunters’ Moon. Many rare artifacts from the original Fort Ouiatenon are displayed by the Tippecanoe County Historical Association during Feast of the Hunters’ Moon. 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... The National Register of Historic Places is the USAs official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects worthy of preservation. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... The Feast of the Hunters’ Moon – An annual celebration re-creating the fall festival started by French settlers and Native Americans. ... The Feast of the Hunters’ Moon – An annual celebration re-creating the fall festival started by French settlers and Native Americans. ...


External links

  • Tippecanoe County Historical Association
  • National Historic Marker

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ouiatenon History (963 words)
Fort Ouiatenon was the first fortified European settlement in what is now Indiana.
An early visitor describes Fort Ouiatenon as "the finest palisaded fort in the upper country, consisting of a stockade and a double row of houses." Within the stockade, in addition to the double row of ten houses, were a chapel, a flsmith's shop, and trading areas.
For a while after the Revolution, Fort Ouiatenon remained a settlement for a small number of French inhabitants and was a popular meeting place for local tribes.
Fort Ouiatenon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (390 words)
Fort Ouiatenon was the first fortified European settlement in what is now called Indiana, located approximately three miles southwest of modern-day West Lafayette.
Today Fort Ouiatenon is open to tourists and is the location of the annual Feast of the Hunters’ Moon.
Many rare artifacts from the original Fort Ouiatenon are displayed by the Tippecanoe County Historical Association during Feast of the Hunters’ Moon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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