FACTOID # 16: In the 2000 Presidential Election, Texas gave Ralph Nader the 3rd highest popular vote count of any US state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fort Michilimackinac
Fort Michilimackinac
(U.S. National Historic Landmark)
Fort Michilimackinac, on the Straits of Mackinac
Location: Mackinaw City, Michigan
Built/Founded: 1681
Added to NRHP: October 15, 1966
NRHP Reference#: 66000395[1]
Governing body: Local

Fort Michilimackinac was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading post in the Great Lakes of North America. Built around 1715, it was located along the southern shore of the strategic Straits of Mackinac connecting Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, at the northern tip of the lower peninsula of the present-day state of Michigan in the United States. The site of the fort in present-day Mackinaw City is a National Historic Landmark and is now preserved as an open-air historical museum. For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Mackinaw City is a village in Emmet County, with a small portion lying within Cheboygan County, in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... The Great Lakes from space The Great Lakes are a group of five large lakes on or near the United States-Canadian border. ... North American redirects here. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Straits of Mackinac, spanned by the Mackinac Bridge, seen from the southern shore View of the Straits from Mackinac Island The Straits of Mackinac (pronounced , like MACK-in-aw, note the silent c) is the strip of water that connects two of the Great Lakes, Lake Michigan and Lake... Ipperwash Beach, Lake Huron. ... Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Mackinaw City is a village in Emmet County, with a small portion lying within Cheboygan County, in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...

Contents

History

The primary purpose of the fort was not military, but rather as a link in the French trading post system that stretched from the Mississippi River through the Illinois Country to the St. Lawrence River. The fort served as a supply for traders in the western Great Lakes. For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... French settlements and forts in the Illinois Country in 1763, showing U.S. current state boundaries. ... The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The French had first established a presence in the Straits of Mackinac in 1671 when Father Marquette established a Jesuit mission at present-day St. Ignace. In 1683, they augmented the mission with Fort de Buade. In 1701, Sieur de Cadillac moved the French garrison to Fort Detroit and closed the mission. By 1715, however, the French built Fort Michilimackinac to re-establish a presence along the Straits of Mackinac, with several modifications and expansions to the palisade walls over the decades. Father Jacques Marquette, S.J. (1636 - May 19, 1675) and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to see and map the Mississippi River. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Saint Ignace, usually written as St. ... Fort de Buade was a French fort operating at the present site of St. ... Statue of Cadillac commemorating his landing, in Detroits Hart Plaza Antoine Laumet, dit de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac (March 5, 1658 – October 15, 1730), a French explorer, was a colourful figure in the history of New France. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Year 1715 (MDCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The French relinquished the fort, along with their territory in Canada, to the British in 1761 following their loss in the French and Indian War. Although British continued to operate the fort as a major trading post, French civilians were allowed to live their normal lives with French traditions and worship their Roman Catholic beliefs at St. Anne's Church. The Ojibwe in the region resented British policies as harsh. On June 2, 1763, as part of the larger movement known as Pontiac's Rebellion, a group of Ojibwe staged a game of baaga'adowe (lacrosse) outside the fort as a ruse to gain entrance. After gaining entrance to the fort, they killed most of the British inhabitants and held the fort for a year before the British retook it with the provision to offer more and better gifts to the native inhabitants of the area. 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants France First Nations allies: Algonquin Lenape Wyandot Ojibwa Ottawa Shawnee Great Britain American Colonies Iroquois Confederacy Strength 3,900 regulars 7,900 militia 2,200 natives (1759) 50,000 regulars and militia (1759) Casualties 3,000 killed, wounded or captured 10,040 killed, wounded or captured The French and... For other uses of Chippewa, see Chippewa (disambiguation). ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants British Empire American Indians Commanders Jeffrey Amherst, Henry Bouquet Pontiac, Guyasuta Strength ~3,000 soldiers[1] ~3,500 warriors[2] Casualties 450 soldiers killed, 2,000 civilians killed or captured, 4,000 civilians displaced ~200 warriors killed, possible additional war-related deaths from disease Pontiacs Rebellion was a... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ...


The British eventually deemed the wooden fort on the mainland too vulnerable to attack, and in 1781 they built Fort Mackinac, a limestone fort on nearby Mackinac Island. The buildings were dismantled and moved piece by piece over water in the summer and ice in winter to the island over the course of two years. Patrick Sinclair, the lieutenant governor of Michilimackinac, ordered the remains of Fort Michilimackinac destroyed after the move. 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Fort Mackinac painting Fort Mackinac was a military outpost garrisoned from the late 18th century to the late 19th century on Mackinac Island in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... Mackinac Island (pronounced or MACK-in-aw) is an island covering 3. ... Patrick Sinclair, (1736 – 31 January 1820), was from Lybster, Scotland and joined the British army at about age 18 and was involved in a 1758 attack of Guadeloupe. ...


Today

The fort grounds were designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. It is a popular tourist attraction as part of Colonial Michilimackinac State Park in Mackinaw City, a major section of the Mackinac State Historic Parks. Interpreters, both paid and volunteer, help bring the history to life, with live demonstrations and reenactments, including musket and cannon firing demonstrations. The site has numerous restored historical wooden structures and is considered one of the most extensively excavated early French archaeological sites in the United States. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... Colonial Michilimackinac is a reconstructed 1715 French fur-trading village and military outpost that was later occupied by British military and traders. ... Mackinaw City is a village in Emmet County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ...


The fort grounds also contain the Old Mackinac Point Light, which is an 1892 lighthouse, and a day use park with a great view of the Mackinac Bridge and Mackinac Island. The Old Mackinac Point Light, built in Mackinaw City, Michigan, was a principal lighthouse of the Straits of Mackinac from 1892 until 1957. ... Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wavewashed lighthouses For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation). ...


References

  1. ^ National Register Information System. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service (2007-01-23).

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760  - Treaty... Flag History  - Established 1604  - English conquest 1713 Acadia (1754) Acadia (in the French language lAcadie) was the name given to a colonial territory in northeastern North America that included parts of eastern Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and modern-day New England, stretching as far south as Philadelphia. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... The History of Newfoundland and Labrador starts with two separate regions, the Colony of Newfoundland and the region of Labrador, then converge after 1946, with the creation of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... For other uses, see Cape Breton. ... Image File history File links LouisXIV.gif‎ Pavillon de Louis XIV File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): New France History of Quebec Monarchy in Quebec ... The Habitation at Port-Royal is a National Historic Site located at Port Royal in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... // Quebec City was founded on July 3, 1608 by Samuel de Champlain. ... Location City Information Established: January 1, 2002 Area: 228. ... View of Montreal from Mount Royal, 1784 Rue Saint-Dominique, 1866 Lachine Canal, 1875 The human history of Montreal, located in Quebec, Canada, spans some 8,000 years and started with the Algonquin, Huron, and Iroquois tribes of North America. ... French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac founded a fort and settlement at the site of Detroit in 1701. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Fortress of Louisbourg: Siege of 1758. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... The history of New Orleans, Louisiana traces its development from its founding by the French, through its period under Spanish control, then back to French rule before being sold to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. ... Panorama of Placentia. ... Fort Rouillé was a French trading post located in Toronto, Ontario, which was established around 1750 but abandoned in 1759. ... Fort de Chartres existed as a succession of three French fortifications built during the 1700s on the east bank of the Mississippi River in the area of upper Louisiana known as the Illinois Country. ... Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit or Fort Detroit was a fort established by the French officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac in 1701. ... Fort Ticonderoga is a large 18th century fort built at a strategically important narrows in Lake Champlain where a short traverse gives access to the north end of Lake George in the state of New York, USA. The fort controlled both commonly used trade routes between the English-controlled Hudson... 19th century illustration of Fort Duquesne, by Alfred Waud. ... This is a list of all Forts built by the French government or French Chartered companies in what later became Canada and the United States. ... Governor General of New France was the vice-regal post in New France from 1663 until 1763. ... New France was governed by three rulers: the governor, the bishop and the intendant, all appointed by the King, and sent from France. ... The Sovereign Council of New France was a political body appointed by the King of France and consisting of a Governor General, an intendant and a bishop of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Diocese of Quebec is the oldest Catholic see in the New World north of Mexico. ... This is a list of governors of Montreal. ... Categories: Canadian history | Acadia | Canadian historical figures ... This is a list of viceroys for the colony, dominion and province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... This is a list of the governors of Louisiana, from acquisition by the United Sates in 1803 to the present day; for earlier governors of Louisiana see List of colonial governors of Louisiana. ... The title of intendant (French: , Spanish intendente) has been used in a number of countries through history. ... Admiralty courts, also known as maritime courts, are courts exercising jurisdiction over all maritime contracts, torts, injuries and offences. ... Provost is from the Latin praepositus (set over, from praeponere, to place in front). It may mean: Provost (religion), a church official. ... An ecclesiastical court (also called Court Christian) is any of certain courts having jurisdiction mainly in spiritual or religious matters. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Bailiff (from Late Latin bajulivus, adjectival form of bajulus) is a governor or custodian (cf. ... Marshal (also sometimes spelled marshall in American English, but not in British English) is a word used in several official titles of various branches of society. ... The Code noir (French language: The Black Code), was a decree passed by Frances King Louis XIV in 1689. ... The seigneurial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land distribution used in the colonies of New France. ... The 1666 census of New France was the first census conducted in Canada (and indeed in North America). ... An Alberta fur trader in the 1890s. ... The Company of One Hundred Associates was a business enterprise created at a time when all territories explored by the French and seized as a part of the French colonial empire were the property of the King of France. ... Antoine Crozat, Marquis du Chatel (Toulouse, ca. ... For the later land company, see Mississippi Land Company. ... The Compagnie de lOccident was a French Crown corporation that existed from 1664 to 1667. ... Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852) Habitants is the name used to referred to the French settlers who established a colony in the Haudenosaunee First Nations territory along the shores of the St. ... The Kings Daughters (in French: filles du roi, filles du roy) were between 700 and 900 Frenchwomen (accounts vary as to the exact numbers) who immigrated to New France (now part of Canada) between 1663 and 1673 under the monetary sponsorship of Louis XIV, as an attempt to rectify... A coureur de bois was an individual who engaged in the fur trade without permission from the French authorities. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mestizo. ... For other uses, see Native Americans (disambiguation). ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ... The French and Iroquois Wars (also called the Iroquois Wars or the Beaver Wars) commonly refer to a brutal series of conflicts fought in the mid-17th century in eastern North America. ... Deportation of Acadians order, read by Winslow in Grand-Pré church The Great Upheaval, also known as the Great Expulsion, The Deportation, the Acadian Expulsion, or to the deportees, Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced population transfer or ethnic cleansing of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755... The Great Peace of Montreal was a peace treaty between New France and 39 First Nations of North America. ... Early in 1690, a party of over 200 French and Sault and Algonquin Indian raiders set out from Montreal to attack English outposts to the south. ... The Deerfield massacre occurred during Queen Annes War on February 29, 1704, when joint French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English (predominantly puritan) settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts at dawn, razing the town and killing fifty-six colonists. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... -1... Quebec has played a special role in Canadian history; it is the site where French settlers founded the colony of Canada (New France) in the 1600s and 1700s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Flag In 1803, the United States concluded the Louisiana Purchase (green area) with France. ... The term French West Indies (see also Antilles françaises) refers to the two French overseas departments of Guadeloupe and Martinique. ... The Carib Expulsion took place in 1660. ... The slave trade in Africa has existed for thousands of years. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The History of the National Register of Historic Places began in 1966 when the United States government passed the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), which created the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). ... Clockwise from bottom left: a site, a building, a structure and an object. ... Helvenston House, part of the Ocala Historic District, in Ocala, Florida. ... Broadly defined, a contributing property is any property, structure or object which adds to the historical intergrity or architectural qualities that make a historic district, listed locally or federally, significant. ... Image File history File links US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo. ... This is a list of entries on the National Register of Historic Places. ... The National Park System of the United States is the collection of physical properties owned or administered by the National Park Service. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fort Michilimackinac - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (426 words)
Fort Michilimackinac was an 18th century French, and later British, fort and trading post in the Great Lakes of North America.
The primary purpose of the fort was not military, but rather as a link in the French trading post system that stretched from the Mississippi River through the Illinois Country to the St.
By 1715, however, the French built Fort Michilimackinac to re-establish a presence along the Straits of Mackinac.
Fort Mackinac - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2054 words)
Fort Mackinac was a military outpost garrisoned from the late 18th century to the late 19th century on Mackinac Island in the U.S. state of Michigan.
During the mid 19th century, the fort became an important staging area for exploration of the northern Michigan Territory, including the 1832 expedition under the command of Lewis Cass to explore the headwaters of the Mississippi River.
The post of Indian agent at the fort was held for a time in the 1830s by Henry Schoolcraft, who conducted pioneering studies of the Native American languages and culture of the region.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m