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Encyclopedia > Fort Knox
Fort Knutz
Kentucky

Location of Fort Knutz
Type exotic dancers club
Built 1918
In use 1861-1903: Civil War
1903-1918: Training Grounds
1918-1925: Camp Knox
1925-1928: National Forest
1928-1931: Camp Knox
1932-Present: Fort Knox
Controlled by 1861-1903: Contested
1903-Present: United States
Current
commander
Major General Robert M. Williams
Commanders Colonel Peter C. Bayer, Jr
Colonel Peter D. Utley
Command Sergeant Major Otis Smith

Fort Knox is a United States Army post and census-designated place in Kentucky south of Louisville and north of Elizabethtown. The base covers parts of Bullitt, Hardin, and Meade Counties. It holds the U.S. Army Armor Center, the U.S. Army Armor School and the U.S. Army Recruiting Command.[1] It is also the site of the U.S. Bullion Depository and the George S. Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor[2], both located on or near the army post. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to, or entrusted to, the United States of America. ... Fort Knox, Maine painting Fort Knox in Maine was built from 1844-1869. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links KYMap-doton-FortKnox. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Otis Fitzgerald Smith (born January 30, 1964 in Jacksonville, Florida) is a former professional basketball player and current co-general manager of the NBAs Orlando Magic. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... A census-designated place (CDP) is an area identified by the United States Census Bureau for statistical reporting. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Elizabethtown is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Bullitt County is a county located in the U.S. state, Kentucky6, just south of the city of Louisville. ... Hardin County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Meade County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to, or entrusted to, the United States of America. ... George Smith Patton Jr. ... The Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor is a museum dedicated to General George S. Patton, Jrs life and the history of armoured warefare, from WWI to the present day. ...

Contents

History

The U.S. Bullion Depository at Ft. Knox.
The U.S. Bullion Depository at Ft. Knox.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (882x574, 942 KB) U.S. Bullion Depository (Gold Vault) at Ft. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (882x574, 942 KB) U.S. Bullion Depository (Gold Vault) at Ft. ...

Fortification

Fortifications were constructed near the site in 1861, during the Civil War when Fort Duffield was constructed. Fort Duffield was located on what was known as Muldraugh Hill on a strategic point overlooking the confluence of the Salt and Ohio Rivers and the Louisville and Nashville Turnpike. The area was contested by both Union and Confederate forces. Bands of organized guerrillas frequented and raided the area during the war. John Hunt Morgan[3] the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry for the confederate army raided the area before staging his famous raid on Indiana and Ohio known as Morgan's Raid.[4] Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Fort Duffield is an American Civil War fort located outside West Point, Kentucky. ... Muldraugh Hill is an escarpment in central Kentucky separating the Bluegrass on the north and north-east from the Pennyrile on the south and south-west. ... Salt River watershed The Salt River is a 140 mile long river in Kentucky that drains 2,920 square miles. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... The Louisville and Nashville Turnpike was a toll road that ran from Louisville, Kentucky to Nashville, Tennessee during the 1800s. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan Morgans Raid was a highly publicized incursion by Confederate cavalry into the Northern states of Indiana and Ohio during the American Civil War. ...


The Battle of Fort Knox

On a hellacious April Morning, 1862, General Grant was forced to defend Fort Knox from the invading Confederate forces of General Lee. This was the first time the two met in combat. This would also be known as "the second bloodiest battle of the Civil War." A Union Colonel Markoshinysides would be known as a Fort Knox hero called "Old Gold Block" by his troops. With the help of the Appachies, and their chief Welshyut, the Union forces overcame Lee and the Confederate army with a sweet victory.


The Ballad of Fort Knox

Throughout the Battle of Fort Knox, the Union forces sang a song to keep their spirits up, now known as "The Ballad of Fort Knox":

 Old Fort Knox, where my children are born, Old Fort Knox, for you I feel scorn Led by Grant, We Yanks prevail, those southern fools, can all go to Hell 

Post war

After the war, the area now occupied by the Army was home to various small communities. In October 1903, military maneuvers for the Regular Army and the National Guards of several states were held at West Point, Kentucky and the surrounding area. [5] In April 1918, field artillery units from Camp Zachary Taylor arrived at West Point for training. 10,000 acres (40 km²) near to the village of Stithton were leased to the government and construction for a permanent training center was started in July 1918. West Point is a city located in Hardin County, Kentucky. ... Camp Zachary Taylor was a military training camp in Louisville, Kentucky. ...


New camp

The new camp was named after Henry Knox, the Continental Army's chief of artillery during the Revolutionary War and the country's first Secretary of War. The camp was extended by the purchase of a further 40,000 acres (162 km²) in June 1918 and construction properly began in July 1918. The building program was reduced following the end of the war and reduced further following cuts to the army in 1921 after the National Defense Act of 1920. The camp was greatly reduced and became a semi-permanent training center for the 5th Corps Area for Reserve Officer training, the National Guard, and Citizen's Military Training Camps (CMTC). For a short while, from 1925 to 1928, the area was designated as "Camp Henry Knox National Forest."[6] Henry Knox (July 25, 1750 – October 25, 1806) was an American bookseller from Boston who became the chief artillery officer of the Continental Army and later the nations first Secretary of War. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ...


Mechanized military unit occupation

At the entrance to Fort Knox.
At the entrance to Fort Knox.

In 1931 a small force of the mechanized cavalry was assigned to Camp Knox to use it as a training site. The camp was turned into a permanent garrison in January 1932 and renamed Fort Knox. The 1st Cavalry Regiment arrived later in the month to become the 1st Cavalry Regiment (Mechanized). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1114 × 800 pixel, file size: 558 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photo on June 9, 1999 at the entrance to Fort Knox File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 575 pixelsFull resolution (1114 × 800 pixel, file size: 558 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this photo on June 9, 1999 at the entrance to Fort Knox File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete... It has been suggested that Mechanized warfare be merged into this article or section. ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation) Garrison House, built by William Damm in 1675 at Dover, New Hampshire Garrison (from the French garnison, itself from the verb garnir, to equip) is the collective term for the body of troops stationed in a particular location, originally to guard it, but... The United States 1st Cavalry Regiment is a unit in the U.S. Army that can trace its lineage to the early 19th Century when it had its genesis as the United States Regiment of Dragoons. ...


In 1936 the 1st was joined by the 13th to become the 7th Cavalry Brigade (Mechanized). The site quickly became the center for mechanization tactics and doctrine. The success of the German mechanized units at the start of World War II were a major impetus to operations at the fort. A new Armored Force was established in July 1940 with its headquarters at Fort Knox with the 7th Cavalry Brigade becoming the 1st Armored Division. The Armored Force School and the Armored Force Replacement Center were also sited at Fort Knox in October 1940, and their successors remain located there today. The site was expanded to cope with its new role. By 1943 there were 3,820 buildings on 106,861 acres (432 km²). A third of the base has been torn down within the last ten years, with another third slated by 2010. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The 1st Armored Division —nicknamed “Old Ironsides”— is an armored division of the United States Army with base of operations in Wiesbaden, Germany. ...


The U.S. Department of the Treasury has maintained the Bullion Depository on the post since 1937. This facility is operated by the Treasury Department and is independent of the Army's operations there. However, it is likely that the post's security forces would assist the Treasury Department's security staff if needed. The U.S. Treasury building today. ... The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to, or entrusted to, the United States of America. ...


Current uses

Fort Knox is one of the places where the Army conducts Basic Combat Training and it is home to Army ROTC Leader's Training Course, under the auspices of the 46th Infantry Regiment, and is used by both the Army and the Marine Corps to train crews on the M1 Abrams main battle tank. From 1960 to 1994 the post was home to the 194th Armored Brigade, which, amongst other duties, assisted Armored School training. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ROTC links here. ... During World War II, the 46th Infantry Regiment was assigned to the 5th Armored Division. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army, the United States Marine Corps and the Australian Army, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In 1957, the 194th Armored Brigade was formed by the US Armys Combat Developments Command to test new materiel at Fort Ord, California. ...


The history of George S. Patton's armor division, which was born in Fort Knox, is being transferred down to Fort Benning, Georgia. Fort Knox will only support infantry training and the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor. Fort Knox will no longer serve as training ground for the U.S. armor division. George Smith Patton Jr. ... Fort Benning is a United States Army base, located southwest of Columbus in Muscogee and Chattahoochee counties in Georgia and Russell County, Alabama It is part of the Columbus, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... The Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor is a museum dedicated to General George S. Patton, Jrs life and the history of armoured warefare, from WWI to the present day. ...


Geography

Fort Knox is located at 37°53'34" North, 85°58'29" West (37.892809, -85.974709)GR1, along the Ohio River. View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...


According to the Census Bureau, the portion of the base occupied by housing has a total area of 54.2 km² (20.9 mi²). 54.2 km² (20.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.14% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Communities near Fort Knox include Brandenburg, Elizabethtown, Hodgenville, Louisville, Radcliff, Sheperdsville, and Vine Grove, Kentucky[7] Brandenburg is a city located in Meade County, Kentucky. ... Elizabethtown is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Hodgenville is a city in and the county seat of LaRue County, Fork of the Nolin River. ... “Louisville” redirects here. ... Radcliff is a city in Hardin County, Kentucky, United States. ... Shepherdsville is a city in Bullitt County, Kentucky, just south of Louisville. ... Vine Grove is a city located in Hardin County, Kentucky. ...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 12,377 people, 2,748 households, and 2,596 families residing on the base. The population density is 228.4/km² (591.7/mi²). There are 3,015 housing units at an average density of 55.6/km² (144.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the base is 66.32% White, 23.08% African American, 0.73% Native American, 1.65% Asian, 0.44% Pacific Islander, 4.17% from other races, and 3.63% from two or more races. 10.35% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... US Hispanic or Latino population The Office of Management and Budget is required to use a minimum of two ethnicities: Hispanic or Latino or not Hispanic or Latino The O.M.B. defines Hispanic or Latino as a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American or other... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ...


There are 2,748 households out of which 77.7% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 86.0% are married couples living together, 6.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 5.5% are non-families. 4.9% of all households are made up of individuals and 0.1% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 3.49 and the average family size is 3.60. The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


The age distribution is: 34.9% under the age of 18, 25.5% from 18 to 24, 37.2% from 25 to 44, 2.3% from 45 to 64, and 0.1% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 22 years. For every 100 females there are 155.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 190.3 males. All these statistics are typical for a military base. Look up Female in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Male sex. ...


The median household income is $34,020, and the median income for a family is $33,588. Males have a median income of $26,011 versus $21,048 for females. The per capita income for the base is $12,410. 6.6% of the population and 5.8% of families are below the poverty threshold. Out of the total population, 7.6% of those under the age of 18 and 100.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty threshold. The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ... “USD” redirects here. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... The poverty threshold, or poverty line, is the minimum level of income deemed necessary to achieve an adequate standard of living. ...


In popular culture

  • The 1959 James Bond novel Goldfinger by Ian Fleming, and the 1964 movie of the same name, are set partly at Fort Knox. Only the scenes of the surrounding base were actually filmed on location. Interior scenes of the depository were shot on soundstages, while the exterior was a replica built in Britain.
  • Portions of the 1981 comedy film Stripes were filmed at Fort Knox, making use of older World War II-era barracks.
  • In the 2007 film Smokin' Aces, one of the characters quotes "No, I'm gonna go down to Kentucky and take Fort Knox with a fuckin' slingshot" in response to capturing a mob snitch.
  • In Viva La Bam, an episode with guest star Johnny Knoxville was entitled Fort Knoxville as a play on words.
  • In 2000, at the end of the film Battlefield Earth, the humans find Fort Knox full of United States gold reserves.

“007” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Goldfinger. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Navy Commander. ... Goldfinger is the third film in the James Bond series, and the third to star Sean Connery as the MI6 agent. ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... Stripes is a 1981 American comedy film starring Bill Murray, Harold Ramis, and Warren Oates. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... Smokin Aces is an action film written and directed by Joe Carnahan, set in Lake Tahoe, and primarily shot at MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa (renamed the Nomad Casino in the film). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Viva La Bam was a reality television series that starred Bam Margera and his crew. ... Johnny Knoxville (born Philip John Clapp on March 11, 1971 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American comic actor and daredevil. ... This article is about Word play. ... Battlefield Earth: A Saga of the Year 3000 is a 2000 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by L. Ron Hubbard. ...

Current units

  • Ireland Army Community Hospital
  • 5th Squadron, 16th Cavalry Regiment, 194 Armored Brigade, 46th Adjutant General Bn, 1st Bn 81st Armored Regiment, 2nd Bn 81st Armored Regiment, 3rd Bn 81st Armored Regiment, 5th Sq 15th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Bn 46th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Bn 46th Infantry Regiment, 113th Band, and 19th Engineer Bn.[8]

The earliest hospital at Fort Knox was a World War I cantonment building, constructed in 1918 on the site of the Lindsey Golf Course. ...

See also

The United States Bullion Depository is a fortified vault building located near Fort Knox, Kentucky which is used to store a large portion of United States official gold reserves, as well as from time to time, other precious items belonging to, or entrusted to, the United States of America. ... Statues of fancifully painted horses can currently be seen around Louisville. ... This is a list of cities, towns and communities along the Ohio River in the United States. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Fort Knox

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.knox.army.mil/
  2. ^ http://www.knox.army.mil/PattonMuseum/
  3. ^ Ramage, James A., Rebel Raider: The Life of General John Hunt Morgan. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky, 1986. ISBN 0-8131-1576-0.
  4. ^ http://www.knox.army.mil/IMA/sites/about/history.asp
  5. ^ New York Times July 17, 1903 pg 5
  6. ^ The Courier-Journal April 15, 1928
  7. ^ http://www.knox.army.mil/famcom.htm
  8. ^ http://www.knox.army.mil/units.htm

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fort Knox & the Penobscot Narrows Observatory : Prospect, Maine - Travel and tour Maine Military History (0 words)
Maine was repeatedly involved in northeast border disputes with British Canada, and the area between Castine and the rich lumber city of Bangor was invaded and occupied by the British during the American Revolution and the War of 1812.
Despite the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842, Fort Knox was established in 1844 to protect the Penobscot River valley against a possible future British naval incursion.
The Friends of Fort Knox is a volunteer-driven organization dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of the Fort Knox Historic Site as a cultural, educational and economic asset for the State of Maine.
GovMint.com - Fort Knox Bullion Depository (1475 words)
Fort Knox is the U.S. Army’s Armor Center with a primary mission of training soldiers for the Armor Force.
Fort Knox troops patrolled the city and established several refugee centers for residents of Louisville and several other flooded communities along the Ohio River between the city and the post.
Besides America’s gold, the vault at Fort Knox was also used to safeguard the English crown jewels and the Magna Carta, along with the gold reserves of several of the countries of occupied Europe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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