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Encyclopedia > Fort George

Fort George is a historic military structure at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, that was the scene of several battles during the War of 1812. The fort consists of earthworks and palisades, along with internal structures. The opposing fortifications of Fort Niagara in New York can be seen from the ramparts. Categories: Canada geography stubs | Ontario communities | Coastal towns of Canada ... The War of 1812 was a conflict fought on land in North America and at sea around the world between the United States and United Kingdom from 1812 to 1815. ... In civil engineering, earthworks are engineering works created through the moving of massive quantities of soil or unformed stone. ... Palisade and Moat A palisade is a Medieval wooden fence or wall of variable height, used as a defensive structure. ... Historical recreation actors at Old Fort Niagara Fort Niagara is a 300 year old fortification built to protect the interests of New France, located near Youngstown, New York on the eastern bank of the Niagara River at its mouth on Lake Ontario. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Rampart may mean: A type of defensive wall consisting of a low earthen embankment topped by a parapet or palisade. ...


Fort George was built by the British after the 1783 Treaty of Paris handed Fort Niagara to the Americans. The new fort was completed in 1802 and became the headquarters for the British Army and the local militia. 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Painting by Benjamin West depicting John Jay, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Henry Laurens, and William Temple Franklin. ...


Fort George was captured by the Americans in May 1813 at the Battle of Fort George. They used the fort as a base to invade Upper Canada but they were repulsed at the Battles of Stoney Creek and Beaver Dams. The fort was retaken by the British in December. The Americans attacked the fort again in 1814 but were unsuccessful. 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Battle of Fort George was a battle fought during the War of 1812, in which the Americans captured the British fort on western Lake Ontario. ... Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario Upper Canada is an early name for the land at the upstream end of the Saint Lawrence River in early North America – the territory south of Lake Nipissing and north of the St. ... The Battle of Stoney Creek was a battle fought on June 6, 1813 during the War of 1812 near Stoney Creek, Ontario. ... The Battle of Beaver Dams was a small battle in 1813 during the War of 1812. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The fortification was abandoned by the military in 1965 and is now maintained by Parks Canada. The fort is open to visitors from April to October. The staff maintains the image of the fort as it was during the early 19th century, with period costumes, exhibits, and displays of that time. Nakhal Fort, one of the best-preserved forts in Oman. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Parks Canada is a Canadian government agency whose purpose is to protect and present nationally significant examples of Canadas natural and cultural heritage and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Every year scouts from both the United States and Canada meet on and near the grounds of the fort and reenact the battle that took place nearly two hundred years ago. This event has happened since 1984 and has grown from a small group of 300 "troops" to over 1800.


External links

  • Fort George information
  • The Scout Brigade of Fort George

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fort George - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (316 words)
Fort George is a historic military structure at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada, that was the scene of several battles during the War of 1812.
Fort George was built by the British after the 1783 Treaty of Paris handed Fort Niagara to the Americans.
Fort George was captured by the Americans in May 1813 at the Battle of Fort George.
Fort St George - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (425 words)
Fort St George is the name of the first British fortress in India, built in 1644 at the coastal city of Madras (modern city of Chennai.) The construction of the fort provided the impetus for further settlements and trading activity, in what was originally a barren land.
Fort St. George was also the name of the military fort built by the British in Bombay around the Casa da Orta, the old castle or keep of the Ortas, the Jewish tenants of the Portuguese king.
Fort St. George was also the name of a fort built by the British in St.
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