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Encyclopedia > Fork
Assorted forks. From left to right: dessert fork, relish fork, salad fork, dinner fork, cold cuts fork, serving fork, carving fork.
Assorted forks. From left to right: dessert fork, relish fork, salad fork, dinner fork, cold cuts fork, serving fork, carving fork.

As a piece of cutlery or kitchenware, a fork is a tool consisting of a handle with several narrow tines (usually two, three or four) on one end. The fork as an eating utensil was a feature primarily of the West, whereas in East Asia chopsticks were more prevalent. Today, however, forks are increasingly available throughout East Asia as well. Look up fork in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1872x1660, 454 KB) Summary Assorted forks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1872x1660, 454 KB) Summary Assorted forks. ... Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. ... This is a list of food preparation utensils, also known as kitchenware. ... Look up tine in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Chopsticks (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geographical region. ...


The utensil (usually metal) is used to lift food to the mouth or to hold food in place while cooking or cutting it. Food can be lifted either by spearing it on the tines, or by collecting it on top of the tines, and holding it atop the tines horizontally. To allow for this spoon-like use, the tines are often curved slightly upward. This article is about metallic materials. ... For other uses, see Mouth (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

The word fork is derived from the Latin furca, meaning "pitchfork". Although the Greeks used [1] the fork as an apparent serving utensil, it is also mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, in the Book of I Samuel 2:13 ("The custom of the priests with the people was that when any man offered sacrifice, the priest’s servant came, while the flesh was boiling, with a fork of three teeth in his hand..."), it wasnt commonly used in Western Europe until the 10th century.


Before the fork was introduced, Westerners were reliant on the spoon and knife as the only eating utensils. Thus, people would largely eat food with their hands, calling for a common spoon when required. Members of the aristocracy would sometimes be accustomed to manners considered more proper and hold two knives at meals and use them both to cut and transfer food to the mouth, using the spoon for soups and broth. For other uses, see Spoon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the tool. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The earliest forks usually had only two tines, but those with numerous tines caught on quickly. The tines on these implements were straight, meaning the fork could only be used for spearing food and not for scooping it. The fork allowed meat to be easily held in place while being cut. The fork also allowed one to spike a piece of meat and shake off any undesired excess of sauce or liquid before consuming it. First introduced to Western Europe in the 10th century by Theophanu, Byzantine wife of Emperor Otto II, the table fork had, by the 11th century, made its way to Italy. In Italy, it became quite popular by the 14th century, being commonly used for eating by merchant and upper classes by 1600. It was proper for a guest to arrive with his own fork and spoon enclosed in a box called a cadena; this usage was introduced to the French court with Catherine de' Medici's entourage. Long after the personal table fork had become commonplace in France, at the supper celebrating the marriage of the duc de Chartres to Louis XIV's natural daughter in 1692, the seating was described in the court memoirs of Saint-Simon:"King James having his Queen on his right hand and the King on his left, and each with their cadenas." In Perrault's contemporaneous fairy tale of La Belle au bois dormant (1697), each of the fairies invited for the christening is presented with a splendid "Fork Holder" As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Otto II and Theophano Theophanu (960 – June 15, 991) (Greek: Θεοφανώ Theophano), also spelled Theophania, was born in Constantinople, and was the wife of Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor. ... Otto II ( 955 – December 7, 983, Rome), was the third German ruler of the Saxon or Ottonian dynasty. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519 – January 5, 1589) was born in Florence, Italy, as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici. ... Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 – December 23, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674–1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701–1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. ... Louis de Rouvroy, duc de Saint-Simon (January 16, 1675 - March 2, 1755), French soldier, diplomatist and writer of memoirs, was born at Versailles. ... James II and VII (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701)[2] was King of England, King of Scots,[1] and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685 to 11 December 1688. ... Louis XIV redirects here. ... This article is about the French author. ... Sir Edward Burne-Jones painted The Sleeping Beauty. ...


The fork's arrival in northern Europe was more difficult. Its use was first described in English by Thomas Coryat in a volume of writings on his Italian travels (1611), but for many years it was viewed as an unmanly Italian affectation. Some writers of the Roman Catholic Church expressly disapproved of its use, seeing it as "excessive delicacy": "God in his wisdom has provided man with natural forks — his fingers. Therefore it is an insult to Him to substitute artificial metallic forks for them when eating."[2][3] It was not until the 18th century that the fork became commonly used in Great Britain. It was around this time that the curved fork used today was developed in Germany. The standard four-tine design became current in the early nineteenth century. Thomas Coryat (also Coryate) (c. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ...

A 1998 design patent drawing for a spork, from U.S. Patent D388,664 
A 1998 design patent drawing for a spork, from U.S. Patent D388,664 

The 20th century also saw the emergence of the "spork", a utensil that is half fork and half spoon. With this new "fork-spoon", only one piece of cutlery is needed when eating (so long as no knife is required). The back of the spork is shaped like a spoon and can scoop food while the front has shortened tines like a fork, allowing spearing of food, making it convenient and easy to use. It has found popularity in fast food and military settings. A spork. ... A titanium spork. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ...


Types of forks

  • Beef fork
A fork used for picking up very thin slices of meat. This fork is shaped like a regular fork, but it is slightly bigger and the tines are curved outward. The curves are used for piercing the thin sliced beef.
  • Berry fork
  • Carving fork
A two-pronged fork used to hold meat steady while it is being carved. They are often sold with carving knives or slicers as part of a carving set.
  • Cheese fork
  • Chip fork
A two-pronged disposable fork, usually made out of sterile wood (though increasingly of plastic), specifically designed for the eating of chips, used predominantly in the United Kingdom, and to a lesser extent all over the world.
  • Cold meat fork
  • Crab fork
A short, sharp and narrow three-pronged or two-pronged fork designed to easily extract meat when consuming cooked crab.
  • Dessert fork (or Pudding fork in Great Britain)
Any of several different special types of forks designed to eat desserts, such as a pastry fork. They usually have only three tines and are smaller than standard dinner forks.
  • Dinner fork
Fish fork
Fish fork
A narrow fork, usually having two tines, long shaft and an insulating handle, typically of wood, for dipping bread into a pot containing sauce
A utensil combining characteristics of a knife and a fork
  • Meat fork
  • Olive fork
  • Oyster fork
  • Pastry fork
  • Pickle fork
A long handled fork used for extracting pickles from a jar
A utensil combining characteristics of a spoon and a fork
  • Tea fork
  • Toasting fork
A fork, usually having two tines, very long metal shaft and sometimes an insulating handle, for toasting food over coals or an open flame

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Chips redirects here. ... For other uses, see Crab (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (201x800, 28 KB) created this image myself I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (201x800, 28 KB) created this image myself I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Fondue refers to several French Swiss communal dishes shared at the table in an earthenware pot (caquelon) over a small burner (rechaud). The term fondue comes from the French fondre (to melt), referring to the fact that the contents of the pot are kept in a liquid state so that... A mechanized knork is demonstrated on Snowflake Day: A Very Special Holiday Episode of Clone High. ... Categories: Stub ... Splayds are a combination of knife, fork and spoon in one utensil. ... A titanium spork. ...

See also

For other uses, see Pitchfork (disambiguation). ... A garden fork differs from a pitchfork because it is designed for digging rather than for lifting. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Table setting refers to the way to set a table with tableware—such as eating utensils and dishware—for serving and eating. ... In software engineering, a project fork or branch happens when a developer (or a group of them) takes a copy of source code from one software package and starts to independently develop a new package. ...

References

  1. ^ Forks
  2. ^ A History of the Table Fork
  3. ^ The Irrational Exhuberance of American Dining Etiquette
  • A history of the evolution of fork design can be found in: Henry Petroski, The Evolution of Useful things (1992); ISBN 0-679-74039-2

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Image File history File links Fork. ... Image File history File links Sound-icon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
fork (2269 words)
Since the fork() call can be considered as atomic from the application's perspective, the set would be initialized as empty and such signals would have arrived after the fork(); see also .
The fork() function is thus used only to run new programs, and the effects of calling functions that require certain resources between the call to fork() and the call to an exec function are undefined.
The fork handlers may attempt to execute portions of the implementation that are not async-signal-safe, such as those that are protected by mutexes, leading to a deadlock condition.
Fork - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (685 words)
As a cutlery or kitchenware, a fork is a tool consisting of a handle with several narrow tines (usually two to four) on one end.
The fork is sometimes referred to as the "king of utensils." Originally, the fork was used as an eating utensil primarily in the West, whereas in East Asia chopsticks were more prevalent.
It is a myth that the fork was introduced to West during the Middle Ages, as the Romans used forks for serving.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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