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Encyclopedia > Foreign affairs
Foreign Affairs
Type Bi-monthly Journal
Format Scholarly Journal

Owner Council on Foreign Relations
Publisher {{{publisher}}}
Editor James F. Hoge, Jr.
Founded 1922
Political position  
Ceased publication   {{{ceased publication}}}
Price {{{price}}}
Headquarters  

Website: http://www.foreignaffairs.org
This article is about a journal. See foreign affairs (disambiguation) for other uses.

Foreign Affairs is an American journal of international relations published by the Council on Foreign Relations, a private sector group established in New York City in 1921 with the goal of keeping the United States involved in world affairs. Image File history File links FA_(magazine). ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Academic publishing describes a system of publishing that is necessary in order for academic scholars to review work and make it available for a wider audience. ... Academic publishing describes a system of publishing that is necessary in order for academic scholars to review work and make it available for a wider audience. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a think tank which describes itself as dedicated to increasing Americas understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Foreign affairs is a synonym for international relations, that is, the activities of a government concerned with foreign relations, foreign policy, diplomacy, and international representation, and the academic study of these activities. ... A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) is a daily record of events or business. ... International Relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs of and relations among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a think tank which describes itself as dedicated to increasing Americas understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents


History

The Council on Foreign Relations was founded in 1921 and was originally composed of 75 members of mainly academic and professional backgrounds. For the first year the Council sought discourse mainly in meetings at their headquarters in New York City. However the members of the Council wished to to seek a wider audience and in 1922 began publishing Foreign Affairs. The Council named Professor Archibald Cary Coolidge of Harvard University as the journal's first editor. As Coolidge was unwilling to move from Boston to New York, Hamilton Fish Armstrong a Princeton alumnus and a European correspondent of the New York Evening Post (now known as the New York Post) was appointed as a co-editor and was sent to work in New York to handle the mechanical work of publishing the journal. Armstrong chose the light blue color to be the cover of the journal and had his two sisters, Margeret and Helen, design the logo (the man on the horse on the upper left hand side of each cover) and the lettering respectively. Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... An Editor is a person who prepares text—typically language, but also images and sounds—for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. ... Boston is a town and small port c. ... Hamilton Fish Armstrong (1893 - 1973) was a U.S. diplomat and editor. ... Princeton University, incorporated as The Trustees of Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is the fourth-oldest institution to conduct higher education in the United States. ... The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ...


Pre-World War II

The lead article in the first issue of Foreign Affairs was written by former Secretary of State under Theodore Roosevelt's Administration Elihu Root. In the initial article Root wrote that the United States had become a World power and as such that the general population needed to be better informed about international matters. John Foster Dulles, then a lawyer from New York who would later become Secretary of State under Dwight D. Eisenhower, also wrote an article on the initial issue of Foriegn Affairs regarding the difficulties surrounding war reparations placed on Germany after the First World War. [1] Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Elihu Root Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman, the son of Oren Root and Nancy Whitney Buttrick. ... In the context of international relations and diplomacy, power (sometimes clarified as international power, national power, or state power) is the ability of one state to influence or control other states. ... John Foster Dulles John Foster Dulles (February 25, 1888 – May 24, 1959) was an American statesman who served as Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from (1953 - 1959). ... Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969, popularly known as Ike) was an American soldier and politician. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


Foreign Affairs was also unique in being one of only few prominent publications to allow, in a series of five issues in 1925, prominent African-American intellectual W.E.B. DuBois. DuBois, a personal friend of Armstrong, wrote mainly about race issues and imperialism. Though from the early days of publication the journal did not have many female authors, in the late 1930s American journalist for Time Magazine Dorothy Thompson would contribute articles. [2] 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... An African American (also Afro-American or Black American, or black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist, sociologist, historian, writer, editor, poet, freemason, and scholar. ... 1930 (MCMXXX) is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Disambiguation:- (Dorothy Thompson (nee Towers) (1923- ) is also the historian wife of the late E. P. Thompson; she is a leading expert on the Chartist movement. ...


Cold War Era

George F. Kennan published his doctrine of containment in a July 1947 issue of Foreign Affairs.
George F. Kennan published his doctrine of containment in a July 1947 issue of Foreign Affairs.

The journal rose to its greatest prominence after World War II when foreign relations became central to United States politics, and the United States became a powerful actor on the global scene. Several extremely important articles were published in Foreign Affairs, including the reworking of George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram", which first publicized the doctrine of containment that would form the basis of American Cold War policy. Image File history File links Source: http://moscow. ... Image File history File links Source: http://moscow. ... George Frost Kennan (February 16, 1904 – March 17, 2005) was an American advisor, diplomat, political scientist, and historian, best known as the father of containment and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War. ... Containment refers to the foreign policy strategy of the United States in the early years of the Cold War. ... Combatants Allies: • Poland, • UK & Commonwealth, • France/Free France, • Soviet Union, • USA, • China, ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Italy, • Japan, ...and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total: 50 million Full list Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total: 12 million Full list World War II... The term is used to describe the interaction taking place among governments, when striving to establish mutual contacts, another word for diplomacy. ... The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... George Frost Kennan (February 16, 1904 – March 17, 2005) was an American advisor, diplomat, political scientist, and historian, best known as the father of containment and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War. ... The X Article, formally titled The Sources of Soviet Conduct, was published in Foreign Affairs in 1947. ... Containment refers to the foreign policy strategy of the United States in the early years of the Cold War. ... The Cold War was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their respective and emerging alliance partners. ...


Eleven different Secretaries of State have written essays in Foreign Affairs. The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ...


Post-Cold War Era

Since the end of the Cold War, and especially after September 11, 2001, the journal's readership has grown significantly. It was in Foreign Affairs that Samuel P. Huntington published his influential "Clash of Civilizations" article. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Samuel Phillips Huntington (born April 18, 1927) is a political scientist known for his analysis of the relationship between the military and the civil government, his investigation of coup detats, and his thesis that the central political actors of the 21st century will be civilizations rather than nation-states. ... Cover of The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order The Clash of Civilizations is a controversial theory in international relations. ...


In November/December 2003 issue of Foreign Affairs, Kenneth Maxwell wrote a review of Peter Kornbluh's book The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability, which gave rise to a controversy about Henry Kissinger's relationship to the regime of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet and to operation Condor. Maxwell claims that key Council on Foreign Relations members, acting at Kissinger's behest, put pressure on Foreign Affairs editor, James Hoge, to give the last word in a subsequent exchange about the review to William D. Rogers, a close associate of Kissinger's, rather than to Maxwell; this went against established Foreign Affairs policy. Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth R. Maxwell (born 1941) is an English historian resident in the United States who specializes in Iberia and Latin America. ... Peter Kornbluh is director of the National Security Archives Chile Documentation Project. ... Henry Kissinger circa 1970s. ... General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military dictatorship that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is a think tank which describes itself as dedicated to increasing Americas understanding of the world and contributing ideas to U.S. foreign policy. ... William D. Rogers (born 1927) is an American lawyer. ...


In September 2004 after Foreign Affairs had published an article by Wang Zhongwen, a Chinese economist, critical of North Korea and calling for a change in North Korean-Chinese relations. The Chinese authorities reacted by closing down Foreign Affair's operations in China. [3] Look up September in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2006 the journal gained some noterity when it published an article by Paul Pillar, a 28-yr veteran of the CIA, who was the senior analyst on the Middle East for the agency in the run up to the War in Iraq. In the article Pillar argued that the Bush Administration had "cherry-picked" intelligence in order to fulfill a predetermined goal to invade Iraq. Pillar also attacks the attempts by the Administration to connect Al-Qaida and Iraq. [4] [5] [6] 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul R. Pillar is a 28-year veteran of the CIA. From 2000-2005, he worked as the national intelligence officer for the Near East and South Asia where he was considered the agencys lead analyst in counterterrorism. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... This article covers invasion specifics. ...


The immediate past Managing Editor of Foreign Affairs was Fareed Zakaria, now the Editor of Newsweek International. The current Managing Editor is Gideon Rose, an expert on international conflict and the Middle East. Fareed Zakaria (born January 20, 1964) is a conservative writer and journalist specializing in international relations. ...


Book review

Since its inception Foreign Affairs has had a fairly long book review section. The section originated after Coolidge asked his colleague at Harvard William L. Langer, a historian and World War I veteran, to run the section. Langer initially had full control over the section and did the reviews entirely by himself. A month before the reviews were due the office in New York would ship approximately one hundred books to Langer to be reviewed and within approximately two weeks he would return the reviews for the section. By the late 1930s however this process was changed with the review section broken down into several subsections. As of March 2005 with a few longer reviews beginning the section, usually written by well-known figures in the field of foreign policy. Then this is followed by a subsection titled "Recent Books on International Relations" with shorter half-page long reviews written by staff writers and broken down into further subsections to account for geographical regions and other issues. Lastly the section's final page shows the top fifteen best selling books on American foreign policy and international affairs. [7] William Leonard Langer Ph. ... Combatants Allies: • Serbia, • Russia, • France, • Romania, • Belgium, • British Empire and Dominions, • United States, • Italy, • ...and others Central Powers: • Germany, • Austria-Hungary, • Ottoman Empire, • Bulgaria Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 8 million Full list Military dead: 3 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total: 6 million Full... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Foreign Affairs - definition of Foreign Affairs in Encyclopedia (286 words)
Foreign Affairs is the foremost American journal of international relations.
The journal is published by the Council on Foreign Relations, a private sector group established in New York City in 1920 with the goal of keeping the United States involved in world affairs even as the government turned to isolationism.
Eleven different Secretaries of State have written essays in Foreign Affairs, and today its articles are still considered to be an important indicator of the line of thinking in the United States Department of State.
Minister of Foreign Affairs (New Zealand) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (438 words)
The Minister of Foreign Affairs is a major portfolio in the Cabinet of New Zealand.
In terms of actual political power, however, the Minister of Foreign Affairs is not as prominent as in other countries (such as Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States), with the Minister of Finance being considerably more influential.
The first New Zealand foreign minister was James Allen, appointed to the post of "Minister of External Affairs" by William Massey in 1919.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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