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Encyclopedia > Fordson tractor
Fordson Model F
Fordson Model F

The Fordson tractor by the Ford Motor Company was the first agricultural tractor to be mass produced. It was a lightweight, frameless tractor with a vapouriser-fed engine and four metal wheels, but lacking a cabin. Fordson Model F tractor This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Fordson Model F tractor This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Ford Motor Company is an American multinational corporation and the worlds third largest automaker after Toyota and General Motors, based on worldwide vehicle sales. ... Mass production is the production of large amounts of standardised products on production lines. ...

Contents

History

Henry Ford achieved success with the Model T Ford, but he was not content to limit himself to cars. He was the son of a farmer and started work on a tractor for farm use. A prototype, called an "automobile plow", was built in 1907 but did not lead to a production model due at least in part to opposition from the corporate board. Tractor design was headed by Eugene Farkas and József Galamb. Henry Ford (1919) Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production. ... 1908 Ford Model T advertisement The Model T (colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie and the Flivver) was an automobile produced by Henry Fords Ford Motor Company from 1908 through 1928. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


As a result Henry Ford set up a separate company, "Henry Ford and Son Company" referring to him and his son Edsel to produce tractors under the Fordson name. Later, when Ford assumed complete control of Ford Motor Company in 1920, the two companies were merged. Ford's hometown of Springwells, Michigan renamed itself Fordson in 1925, although three years later it merged with neighboring Dearborn. The name continues in the local school, Fordson High School, whose sports teams are called the Tractors. Edsel Bryant Ford (November 6, 1893 – May 26, 1943), son of Henry Ford, was born in Detroit. ... Location in Michigan Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Wayne County  - Mayor John B. O’Reilly, Jr. ... Fordson High School is a secondary school located in Dearborn, Michigan, USA. It was completed in 1928 on a fifteen-acre parcel of land which was then the village of Fordson. ...

The first Fordson, now owned by the Henry Ford Museum
The first Fordson, now owned by the Henry Ford Museum

Mass production of Fordson model F started in 1917. The Fordson came at the end of the First World War with its manpower shortages in agriculture, and utilizing Ford's assembly line techniques to produce a large number of inexpensive units, it quickly became the dominant model. Three-quarters of a million tractors were sold in the U.S. alone in the first ten years. Thousands were shipped to the United Kingdom and the Soviet Union where local production was soon started. Fordson had a 77% market share in the U.S. in 1923 before facing increased competition from International Harvester Corp. The first production Fordson tractor, given by Henry Ford to scientist Luther Burbank. ... The first production Fordson tractor, given by Henry Ford to scientist Luther Burbank. ... A Ford Model T, used for giving tourist rides, is shown above at Greenfield Village. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Modern car assembly line. ... Navistar (formerly International Harvester) started in Chicago, United States, which produced agricultural machinery, construction equipment and vehicles. ...


Fordson Model F's were made in the U.S. between 1917 and 1928. They were produced in Cork, Ireland between 1919 and 1932 before production was consolidated at the Dagenham, factory in England, which built Fordsons between 1933 and 1964. 480,000 Fordsons were built in Cork and Dagenham between 1919 and 1952. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 51. ... Dagenham is a town within the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. ...

1947 Fordson Stegamajor
1947 Fordson Stegamajor

Harry Ferguson made a handshake agreement with Henry Ford in 1938 to produce "Ferguson System" tractors. This lasted until 1946 when the Ford Motor Company parted from Ferguson and a protracted lawsuit followed over use of Ferguson's patents. Ford lost the suit, which enabled Ferguson to produce his own designs in his own business. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Henry George (Harry) Ferguson (1884-1960) was born at Growell, near Dromore, County Down in Northern Ireland, and was the son of an Irish farmer. ...


Tractors bearing the Fordson name were produced in England until 1964 when they became simply Fords. After U.S. Fordson production ceased in 1928, Irish-built and later English-built Fordsons were imported to the U.S. This arrangement ended in 1939 with the introduction of the line of "Ford" tractors made in the U.S. for domestic sales. In the early 1960's, two models of Fordson were again exported from England to the U.S., although they were rebadged as Fords.


Starting the Fordson tractor

The early Fordson tractor was a difficult to start and get going. In cold weather it was a chore to start because the oil congealed on the cylinder walls and on the clutch plates. It had to be hand cranked repeatedly with great effort. Strong men took turns cranking between intervals when individual ignition coils were adjusted. Sometimes farmers would build a fire under the tractor to warm up the crankcase and gear boxes to make it crank easier. The tractor, when in use, was fueled by kerosene, but gasoline was required to start it.


Once started, the trial was not over. To get it in motion, the gears had to be shifted and the clutch would not disengage fully from the engine to allow gear change. Once the gear change was accomplished by ramming the hand lever into position, and listening to the grating noise, the tractor would start forward immediately (there had better be clear space ahead). The clutch pedal had to be ridden for awhile until the oil warmed up and the clutch released.

Fordson discing field
Fordson discing field

Image File history File links FordsonFarmacp. ... Image File history File links FordsonFarmacp. ...

Using the Fordson in the field

The Fordson could pull discs and plows that would require at least four mules to pull, and it could work all day long, provided the radiator was continually filled, the fuel replenished, and the water in the air filter tank were changed. The carburetor air was filtered by bubbling it through a water tank. On dry days mud would build up in the water tank after a couple of hours of operation. The mud would then have to be flushed out and the tank refilled.


The whole tractor was without a frame and was essentially one large chunk of iron. Combustion heat from the cylinders would build up through the tractor making the iron seat hot, and the foot rests nearly unbearable. The exhaust pipe would glow. But the tractor would continue working till it wore out the rear wheel bearings, which had to be replaced after a few seasons of operation.


"Prepare to Meet Thy God"

Not only was the Fordson a challenge to start and operate, but it also quickly developed a bad reputation for its propensity to rear up on its hind wheels and tip over, which proved disastrous - and sometimes fatal - for its operator.


Ford Motor Company largely ignored the issue for a number of years as criticism mounted. One farm magazine recommended that Ford paint a message on each Fordson: "Prepare to Meet Thy God." Still another listed the names of over 100 drivers killed or maimed when their Fordsons turned over.


It wasn't until much later that Ford finally took heed of the critics and made modifications, such as extended rear fenders dubbed "grousers" intended to stop the tractor from turning over in a tipping situation, and a pendulum-type "kill switch" to cut power to the engine in such instances.


Fordson in the Soviet Union

A 1923 Soviet stamp featured the Fordson
A 1923 Soviet stamp featured the Fordson

In 1919 Ford signed a contract for a large consignment of Fordson tractors to the Soviet Union, which soon became the largest customer of the company. During 1921—1927 the Soviet Union purchased over 24,000 Fordsons. In addition, in 1924, the Leningrad plant "Red Putilovite" (Красный Путиловец) started the production of tractors Fordson-Putilovets (Фордзон-путиловец). These inexpensive and robust tractors (both American and Soviet models) became the major enticement for Soviet peasants towards collectivisation and were often seen on Soviet posters and paintings from these times. 1923 Soviet stamp showing a Fordson tractor File links The following pages link to this file: Fordson tractor Categories: Pre-1973 Soviet Union images ... 1923 Soviet stamp showing a Fordson tractor File links The following pages link to this file: Fordson tractor Categories: Pre-1973 Soviet Union images ... This a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of Russia. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... A 1923 Soviet stamp featured the Soviet Fordson Logo of Kirov Plant The Kirov Plant or Kirov Factory (Russian: ) is a major Russian machine-building plant in St. ... In the Soviet Union, collectivisation was a policy introduced in the late 1920s, of consolidation of individual land and labour into co-operatives called collective farms (Russian: , kolkhoz) and state farms (Russian: , sovkhoz). ... Categories: Stub | Paintings | Soviet culture ...


List of Fordson models

  • Fordson Model F (produced from 1917-1928 at Dearborn, Michigan and from 1919-1922 at Cork, Ireland)
  • Fordson Model N (produced from 1929-1932 at Cork, Ireland and from 1933-1945 at Dagenham, England)
  • Ford-Ferguson 9N
  • Fordson All-Around (also called Fordson Row Crop, produced 1937 - at Dagenham)
  • Fordson Major E27N (1945-1951, produced at Dagenham)
  • Fordson New Major (1952-1958, produced at Dagenham)
  • Fordson Dexta (1957-1961, produced at Dagenham)
  • Fordson Power Major (1958-1961, produced at Dagenham)
  • Fordson Super Major (1961-1964, produced at Dagenham, called the Ford 5000 in U.S.)
  • Fordson Super Dexta (1962-1964, produced at Dagenham, called the Ford 2000 Diesel in U.S.)

The first of the N Series of Ford tractors was the 9N. It included the first three-point hitch system on tractors, which is still utilized today. ...

Other Ford tractors

U.S. Fordson production ended in 1928. In 1938, Ford introduced the Ford 9N tractor using the Ferguson three-point hitch system. In 1942 Ford introduced the 2N model tractor. This was surprising because so much steel was being used to manufacture products for U.S. and allied troops during World War II. In 1948 the very popular 8N tractor was introduced. More than 500,000 8Ns were sold between 1948 and 1952. The 8N was replaced with the 1953 "Golden Jubliee" tractor. The After 1964, all tractors made by the company worldwide carried the Ford name. In 1986, Ford expanded its tractor business when it purchased the Sperry-New Holland skid-steer loader and hay baler, hay tools and implement company from Sperry Corporation and formed Ford-New Holland which bought out Versatile tractors in 1988. In 1991 Ford sold its tractor division to FIAT with the agreement that they must stop using the Ford name by 2000. In 1998 FIAT removed all Ford identification from their blue tractors and renamed them "New Holland" tractors. Henry George (Harry) Ferguson (1884-1960) was born at Growell, near Dromore, County Down in Northern Ireland, and was the son of an Irish farmer. ... The three-point hitch is a device used on farming tractors used for certain implements. ... CNH Global N.V. (short for Case-New Holland; NYSE: CNH-ADRs) is the second largest manufacturer of agricultural equipment and the third largest maker of construction equipment in the world. ... Versatile is a Canadian brand of agricultural tractor. ... Fiat Grande Punto Fiat Group, or Fiat S.p. ...


External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Fordson tractors

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fordson Tractor Covers (224 words)
Fordson Model F Tractors were produced at the Dearborn, Michigan plant from April 23, 1918 until 1928.
Fordson tractors were also produced from 1919 to 1923 in Ireland at their Cork facility.
In 1929, all Fordson tractor production was moved to the Cork, Ireland facility and Model N production continued there until 1932.
Fordson tractor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1227 words)
The Fordson tractor by the Ford Motor Company was the first agricultural tractor to be mass produced.
The Fordson came at the end of the First World War with its manpower shortages in agriculture, and utilizing Ford's assembly line techniques to produce a large number of inexpensive units, it quickly became the dominant model.
The Fordson could pull discs and plows that would require at least four mules to pull, and it could work all day long, provided the radiator was continually filled, the fuel replenished, and the water in the air filter tank were changed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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