FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fordham University

Fordham University

Latin: Universitas Fordhamensis

Motto Sapientia et Doctrina
(Wisdom and Learning)
Established 1841 (as St. John's College)
Type Private, Independent[1] , Catholic, Jesuit
Endowment $513 million[2]
President Joseph M. McShane, S.J.
Faculty 681 full time, 475 adjunct
Undergraduates 8,430
Postgraduates 7,579 (1,652 law)
Location Bronx, Manhattan, and Tarrytown, New York, USA
Campus Rose Hill (Bronx):
Urban, 85 acres
Lincoln Center (Manhattan):
Urban, 8 acres
Marymount (Tarrytown):
Suburban, 25 acres
Louis Calder Center (Armonk):
Rural, 114 acres (0.5 km²)
Athletics 22 NCAA Division I varsity teams, Atlantic 10 Conference, (except football, Patriot League)
Colors Maroon and White            
Mascot Ram
Website www.fordham.edu

Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. Though now officially an independent institution "in the Jesuit tradition",[4] it was originally founded by the Diocese of New York in 1841 as St. John's College. Fordham is one of the largest among the 28 member institutions in the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Father Joseph M. McShane became the President of Fordham University in the year 2003, after having served as the President of the University of Scranton. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... This article is about the state. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Armonk is a census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of North Castle in Westchester County, New York. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... This article is about the color. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Image File history File links Fordham_University_mascot. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... St. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ...


Enrollment at Fordham University includes more than 8,000 undergraduate students and 7,000 graduate students spread over three campuses in New York State: Rose Hill in the Bronx, Lincoln Center in Manhattan, and Marymount in Tarrytown. The University also maintains permanent programs in the People's Republic of China and the United Kingdom. Fordham awards bachelor's (BA, BFA, and BS), master's, and doctoral degrees.[5] In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... A graduate student (also, grad student or grad in American English, postgraduate student or postgrad in British English) is an individual who has completed a bachelors degree (B.A., B.S./B.Sc. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course that generally lasts three or four years. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... B.S. redirects here. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ...


Fordham University is composed of four undergraduate colleges and six graduate schools, including the tier-1 Fordham Graduate School of Social Service and the particularly selective tier-1 Fordham School of Law. The University offers a BA/BS engineering program in cooperation with Columbia University[6] and a BFA degree program for dance in partnership with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.[7] The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service is a graduate school within Fordham University, in New York. ... Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law or Fordham Law School, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in New York City. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is a modern dance company based in New York, New York. ...


The University is affiliated with the now-independent Fordham Preparatory School, with which it shares its founding. "The Prep", as it is known colloquially, also shares a geographic boundary with the University, in effect occupying a corner of the Rose Hill campus. Fordham Preparatory School (also known as Fordham Prep) is a private Jesuit all-boys high school located in the Bronx, New York City, with an enrollment of approximately 900 students. ... A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ...

Contents

History

1841-1900

The Administration Building at the Rose Hill campus, constructed circa 1841.
The Administration Building at the Rose Hill campus, constructed circa 1841.

Fordham University was founded as St. John's College in 1841 by the Irish-born Coadjutor Bishop (later Archbishop) of the Diocese of New York, the Most Reverend John Joseph Hughes. The College was the first Catholic institution of higher education in the northeastern United States. Bishop Hughes purchased Rose Hill Manor in the Bronx, then part of Westchester County, at $40,000 for the purpose of establishing the school. Rose Hill is the name given to the site in 1787 by Robert Watts, a wealthy New York merchant, in honor of his family's ancestral home of the same name in Scotland. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 558 KB) Summary The Administration Building of Fordham University, Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 558 KB) Summary The Administration Building of Fordham University, Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Archbishop Jerome Hanus of the Archdiocese of Dubuque, Dubuque, Iowa. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... John Hughes Archbishop John Joseph Hughes (June 24, 1797 - January 3, 1864) was the fourth bishop and first Archbishop of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the country. ...


St. John's College opened with a student body of six on June 24, 1841. The Reverend John McCloskey (later Archbishop of New York, eventually to become the first American Cardinal) was its president, and the faculty were secular priests and lay instructors. The College was paired with a seminary, St. Joseph's, which had been founded in 1839 and was in the separate charge of Italian Lazarists (also known as "Vincentians"). St. Joseph's Seminary closed in 1861. is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... John McCloskey, later John Cardinal McCloskey, (March 10, 1810 - October 10, 1885) born to Irish immigrants, in Brooklyn, was the fifth bishop (second archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In the Catholic Church, secular clergy are religious ministers, such as deacons and priests, who do not belong to a religious order. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... Lazarites (Lazarists or Lazarians) are the popular names of the Congregation of Priests of the Mission in the Roman Catholic Church. ... St. ...


On April 10, 1846 St. John's College received its charter from the New York state legislature to grant degrees in theology, arts, law, and medicine. Also in 1846, Bishop Hughes convinced a group of Jesuits working in Kentucky to move to New York and staff his new school. Part of the agreement between Hughes and the Jesuits was that they would also open a school in what was then the city proper, and they lost little time in doing so. In September of 1847, the first school in Manhattan with a connection to what would become Fordham University opened its doors on the Lower East Side of the city, on Elizabeth and Walker Streets, across the street from the border of the notorious "Five Points" neighborhood. A devastating fire five months later forced the new school to move to the basement of St. James Catholic Church to finish its first year of operation. From 1848 to 1850, the school operated out of rented space on Third Avenue in the East Village, until its first permanent home was constructed on West 15th Street, just off of Sixth Avenue. In 1861 this school was granted its own charter and became an independent institution under the new name of the College of St. Francis Xavier, although many ties remained with the Jesuits of St. John's College in the Bronx. is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The New York Legislature is the legislative branch of the U.S. state of New York, seated at the states capital, Albany. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Legal education in the United States generally refers to the education of lawyers, and that is the focus of this article. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. Medical education in the United States includes educational activities involved in the education and training of medical doctors in the United States, from entry-level training through to continuing education of qualified specialists. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... L.E.S. redirects here. ... Five Points (or The Five Points) was a notorious slum centered on the intersection of Worth St. ... Third Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the East Side of Manhattan in New York City, running in that borough from East 4th Street north for over 120 blocks. ... Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village. ... Sixth Avenue looking south from 18th Street Sixth Avenue is a major avenue in New York Citys borough of Manhattan. ...


1901-1950

Keating Hall at the Rose Hill campus circa February 1937.
Keating Hall at the Rose Hill campus circa February 1937.

With the addition in 1905 of a law school and a (now defunct) medical school, the name was changed to Fordham University in 1907 (despite the name of the original college, Fordham has never had any connection with St. John's University). The name Fordham ("ford by the hamlet") refers to the Fordham neighborhood of the Bronx in which the Rose Hill campus is located. This neighborhood was named either as a reference to the colonial settlement that was located near a shallow crossing of the Bronx River, or as a reference to Rev. John Fordham, an Anglican priest. Image File history File links Keatinghall. ... Image File history File links Keatinghall. ... St. ... A ford, with pedestrian footbridge, on a minor road near Weimar bei Kassel in Germany The ford at Brockenhurst, leading into the village centre, following heavy rain. ... A hamlet is (usually — see below) a small settlement, too small or unimportant to be considered a village. ... Fordham is a working class neighborhood in the New York City borough of The Bronx. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Bronx River in Westchester County, NY The Bronx River is a river, approximately 24 mi (38 km) long, in southeast New York in the United States. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


Fordham University Press, a member the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) since 1938, was established in 1907 not only to represent and uphold the values and traditions of the University itself, but also to further those values and traditions through the dissemination of scholarly research and ideas. The press publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences, with an emphasis on the fields of philosophy, theology, history, classics, communications, economics, sociology, business, political science, and law, as well as literature and the fine arts. Additionally, the press publishes books focusing on the metropolitan New York region and books of interest to the general public. The Fordham University Press is a publishing house, a division of Fordham University, that publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ...


In 1912, the university opened a College of Pharmacy, which offered a three-year program in pharmacy and did not require its students to obtain bachelor's degrees until the late 1930s. The College had a mainly Jewish student body, and in recognition of that, students were exempt from the then-required course in Catholic theology. The College's longtime dean, Jacob Diner, was also Jewish.[8] For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ...


In 1913 the decision was made to close the College of St. Francis Xavier (though leaving the associated Xavier High School intact), and Fordham began opening schools in Manhattan once again, then at the Woolworth Building in the Financial District (the tallest building in the world at the time). Due to the ornate lobby of this skyscraper, the students soon began referring to it as the "marble campus" of Fordham in contrast to the then rural nature of the Rose Hill campus. Various colleges flourished at the Woolworth Building over the years, including Fordham College–Manhattan Division, the College of Business Administration, and the Undergraduate School of Education. In the midst of World War II, Fordham moved its Manhattan schools to a new location a few blocks north of City Hall at 302 Broadway. The Fordham College of Liberal Studies traces its founding to this period, evolving from Ignatius College which held classes on both campuses. In the years following World War II, Fordham in Manhattan continued to flourish, and the University was soon looking for a larger space to house its "downtown" schools. Xavier High School is a premiere all-boys Jesuit Catholic high school located in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... The Woolworth Building, at sixty stories, is one of the oldest — and one of the most famous — skyscrapers in New York City. ... A view up Broad Street in the Financial District in Manhattan Federal Hall The Financial District of New York City is a neighborhood on the southernmost section of the borough of Manhattan which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the citys major financial institutions, including the New... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... City Hall in its modern setting New York City Hall is the center of New York Citys municipal government. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ...


First broadcast in 1947, WFUV 90.7 FM in New York City, is Fordham University's 50,000-watt radio station. It is now a National Public Radio affiliate, and still has a strong student-run news and sports department, though much of the other programming is staffed by professionals. The studios are located in Keating Hall on the Rose Hill campus, and the transmitter is located atop a building owned by the nearby Montefiore Medical Center. WFUV, 90. ... NPR redirects here. ... Montefiore Medical Center, in the Bronx, New York, the university hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, is one of the 50 largest employers in New York State[1]. Located in Norwood, it was founded in 1884 as the Home for Chronic Invalids, housing mainly tuberculosis patients. ...


1951-2000

The front of the Leon Lowenstein Building at the Lincoln Center campus.
The front of the Leon Lowenstein Building at the Lincoln Center campus.

Fordham's great opportunity came in the mid-1950s, when it was invited to be part of the Lincoln Square Renewal Project, seeking to replace substandard housing on Manhattan's west side with a new performing arts complex that would become known as Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. Fordham was the first of the city's institutions involved in the project to fully sign on, purchasing most of the property from West 60th Street to West 62nd Street between Columbus Avenue and Amsterdam Avenue. Part of the opening sequence of the movie West Side Story was filmed on Fordham's property before construction began (the story was set in the neighborhood), and in 1961 Fordham's Law School was the first building to open in the Lincoln Square Renewal Project. Later the Metropolitan Opera, the New York Philharmonic, the New York City Ballet, and the Juilliard School would join Fordham in the neighborhood as part of this project. As work on Fordham's Leon Lowenstein Building progressed, the University decided to phase out the various undergraduate colleges it conducted at 302 Broadway and replace them with a new school, "The Liberal Arts College." In January of 1969, its second semester of operation, the new college moved into its permanent home in the Lowenstein Building at the Lincoln Center campus. The Law School and the undergraduate college were soon joined by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Social Service. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 307 KB) Summary Description: The front of the Leon Lowenstein Building at Fordham University in Lincoln Center Source: Olympus Corporation C160,D395 Camera Date: March 6, 2006 5:44 PM Author: Brent Nycz Permission: Granted File links The following pages... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 307 KB) Summary Description: The front of the Leon Lowenstein Building at Fordham University in Lincoln Center Source: Olympus Corporation C160,D395 Camera Date: March 6, 2006 5:44 PM Author: Brent Nycz Permission: Granted File links The following pages... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Columbus Avenue is an avenue in New York Citys Upper West Side and is named after Christopher Columbus. ... Tenth Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Logo of the New York City Ballet The New York City Ballet is a ballet company founded in 1948 by choreographer George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein originally known as the American Ballet. ... The Juilliard School is one of the worlds premiere performing arts conservatory located in New York City, it is informally identified as simply Juilliard, and trains in the fields of Dance, Drama, and Music. ...


In 1969 the board of trustees was reorganized to include a majority of non-clergy members, and officially made the University an independent institution. The College of Pharmacy closed because of declining enrollment in 1972. After 133 years as a college for men, the Fordham College at Rose Hill became coeducational in 1974, as a result of the merger with Thomas More College (the University’s coordinate college for women opened in 1964). It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ...


Since its opening in 1968, the undergraduate college in Manhattan has had its name changed from "The Liberal Arts College" to "The College at Lincoln Center" and in 1996 to Fordham College at Lincoln Center. In 1993, a twenty-story residence hall was added to the campus to house 850 graduate and undergraduate students. A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ...


2001-present

Marymount College, an independent women's college founded in 1907 by the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary (R.S.H.M.) was consolidated into Fordham University in July of 2002. It had been steeped in financial hardship since the 1970s. Marymount College of Fordham University was a small private womens college in the United States, and part of Fordham University. ... In higher education, particularly in the United States, a womens college is a college (that is, a primarily undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institution) whose students are exclusively women. ...


In August of 2005, the University announced a multi-year, $1 billion proposed master plan to add 1.5 million square feet of academic, student activities, and dormitory space to the Lincoln Center campus. The development of the campus will begin with the expansion of Quinn Library and the construction of a new Law School building, a new student center, a dormitory, and additional parking. Future phases of the development plan include the construction of new space for Fordham College of Liberal Studies, Fordham College at Lincoln Center, the Graduate School of Business, the Graduate School of Social Service, and the Graduate School of Education.[9] In 2007, Fordham launched a "neighbors" site designed to answer community concerns about the Lincoln Center campus expansion.


The plans for the Lincoln Center campus are part of a university-wide plan to enhance the quality of education at Fordham in an effort to become the preeminent Catholic institution of higher learning in America.[10] The first part of the strategic plan is entitled Toward 2016, with intent to achieve significant goals by the University's 175th Anniversary. // This is meant to serve as a way of organizing the Catholic colleges and universities in the United States by affiliation. ...


In October of 2005, the University's Board of Trustees declared that Marymount College would be phased out of the Institution by June of 2007. The campus in Tarrytown, New York is now, in part, home to Fordham's Graduate School of Religion & Religious Education and no longer an undergraduate women's college. Officials cited financial infeasibility as the cause of the college's elimination. In September 2007 the administration announced that it was seeking a buyer for the Marymount campus, and that its programs would be moved to 400 Westchester Avenue in Harrison, New York by Fall 2008. University administration stated that the costs of operating the campus exceeded the University's needs. Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Harrison is a town/village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ...


Academics

Fordham University's academic ideals are drawn from its Jesuit influences. The University promotes a Jesuit principle known as cura personalis, which fosters a faculty and administration respect for the individual student and their uniqueness, and the Jesuit principle magis which intends to inspire service and strive for excellence in all aspects of life, even beyond the academic.[11] Cura Personalis is a Latin phrase that translates as Care of the Person. It is an expression commonly used by the Catholic Church religious order, the Society of Jesus. ... Magis [pronounced mah gís]] is a Jesuit phrase that means the more. It is taken from Ad majorem Dei gloriam, meaning for the greater glory of God. Magis referes to doing more for Christ. ...


Core Curriculum

All undergraduate colleges at Fordham share a Core Curriculum that consists of 17–21 courses drawn from nine disciplines and/or families of disciplines intended to provide a sound liberal arts education. In outline, the core includes: The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia Universitys Columbia College. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ...

Students are expected to complete the core (in their home school) by the end of sophomore year, with the exception of the Global, Pluralism, and Senior Values courses.[12] Composition Studies (also referred to as Composition and Rhetoric, College Composition, or simply Composition) is the professional field of writing instruction, especially at the college level in the United States. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Pluralism (political philosophy) This article is about pluralism in politics. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Value is a term that expresses the concept of worth in general, and it is thought to be connected to reasons for certain practices, policies or actions. ... This article is about the use of the moral in storytelling. ...


Colleges and schools

Fordham University comprises four undergraduate colleges and six graduate schools on three campuses.


Undergraduate colleges

Keating Hall with Edwards Parade in the foreground (Rose Hill campus).
Keating Hall with Edwards Parade in the foreground (Rose Hill campus).
  • Fordham College at Rose Hill (1841)
  • College of Business Administration (1920)
  • Fordham College of Liberal Studies (1944)
  • Fordham College at Lincoln Center (1968)

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x876, 321 KB) Summary Keating Hall, Rose Hill, Fordham University Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1222x876, 321 KB) Summary Keating Hall, Rose Hill, Fordham University Photograph by Chriscobar Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Fordham University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Fordham College of Liberal Studies is a degree-granting undergraduate college within Fordham University in the United States. ...

Graduate schools

  • School of Law (1905)
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1916)
  • Graduate School of Education (1916)
  • Graduate School of Social Service (1916)
  • Graduate School of Business Administration (1969)
  • Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education (1969)

Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law or Fordham Law School, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in New York City. ... The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service is a graduate school within Fordham University, in New York. ...

Libraries

Leo T. Kissam Memorial Law Library at Fordham Law School
Leo T. Kissam Memorial Law Library at Fordham Law School

The Fordham University libraries own more than 2 million volumes, subscribe to over 15,500 periodicals and 19,000 electronic journals, and serve as a depository for United States Government documents. The libraries own many special collections of rare books and manuscripts covering a variety of subjects including Americana, Jesuitica, the French Revolution, and Criminology. The libraries also provide access to more than 200 electronic databases and over 60,000 electronic books.[13] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 122 KB)[edit] Summary The author of this photo is me, David Shankbone. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 122 KB)[edit] Summary The author of this photo is me, David Shankbone. ... Fordham Law atrium from Lowenstein Plaza Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA approved law schools in New York City. ... A diner, a style of restaurant that notably began in the United States. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Criminology is the scientific study of crime as an individual and social phenomenon. ...

  • The William D. Walsh Family Library, which opened in 1997 at the Rose Hill campus, contains over 1 million volumes and 380,000 government documents. In its 2004 edition of The Best 351 Colleges, the Princeton Review ranked Fordham's Walsh Library fifth in the country.
  • The Gerald M. Quinn Library at the Lincoln Center campus (in the Lowenstein building) contains some 500,000 volumes. In addition to a general collection serving Fordham College at Lincoln Center, the Quinn Library also has strong collections in business, education, and social service serving the three graduate schools on that campus.
  • The Gloria Gaines Memorial Library at the Marymount campus houses over 130,000 volumes and primarily serves the graduate students in business, education, and social service programs located on the campus.
  • The Leo T. Kissam Memorial Law Library at the Lincoln Center campus (in the Law School building) contains over 326,000 volumes, 1 million microforms, and 5,270 periodicals. Subject strengths include American and international law, with many foreign legal sources including European Community law and international antitrust law.

The William D. Walsh Family Library, which opened in 1997, is located at Fordham Universitys Rose Hill Campus in the Bronx. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The European Union is unique among international organizations in having a complex and highly developed system of internal law which has direct effect within the legal systems of its member states. ... Antitrust is also the name for a movie, see Antitrust (movie) Antitrust or competition laws legislate against trade practices that undermine competitiveness or are considered to be unfair. ...

Honor societies and programs

  • Matteo Ricci Society: The Matteo Ricci Society is an honor society open to Fordham students who are likely candidates for academic fellowships. Students are invited to join based on academic success and other factors. Faculty assist members in preparing applications for fellowships. It can provide funding for certain approved summer research opportunities and prominent internships
  • Honors Study: All four undergraduate colleges at Fordham offer an honors program for matriculated students. Eligible students from any major (with the exception of the BFA degree program in Dance) may be selected.

Fordham College of Liberal Studies offers an honors program option tailored specifically for non-traditional students, which is unusual for institutions serving that student population. Matteo Ricci. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, or BFA, or B.F.A. is an undergraduate degree. ... Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age...


Specifics of the program differ among the four undergraduate colleges, but the program size is small in each case. Students are selected from the top percentile of each incoming freshmen class, based on their academic and extra-curricular achievements. Honors students are required to take specific Honors classes which replace the Core Curriculum. The Honors programs emphasize independent projects under faculty guidance. Successful completion of the program entitles the student to the designation in cursu honorum on the diploma and the transcript. In cursu honorum is a Latin phrase that translates to in a course of honors. ...

There are chapters of the Society of Sigma Xi, a national honorary scientific research organization established to recognize and foster the scientific spirit in American colleges and to provide both stimulus and acknowledgement for independent scientific research; Pi Sigma Alpha, the national honor society for political science students; Alpha Mu Gamma, the national honor society for foreign languages. Fordham also has chapters of Phi Delta Kappa and Kappa Delta Pi, both honor societies in education. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Phi Kappa Phi is one of the oldest, most prestigious and selective multi-disciplined honor societies in the United States. ... The Honor Society of Jesuit Colleges and Universities since 1915 What is Alpha Sigma Nu? Alpha Sigma Nu is the national honor society of Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States. ... Beta Gamma Sigma or ΒΓΣ is an honor society for business students and scholars. ... BAΨ (Beta Alpha Psi) is an honorary organization for accounting, finance and information systems students and professionals. ... Alpha Sigma Lambda is a national honor society for non-traditional undergraduate students (typically over the age of 24) who achieve and maintain outstanding scholastic standards and leadership characteristics while adroitly handling additional responsibilities of work and family. ... Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age... Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society, founded in 1886, is a non-profit honor society of about 62,000 scientists and engineers elected on the basis of their research achievements or potential. ... // Pi Sigma Alpha (Π Σ Α), National Political Science Honor Society, was founded in 1920 at the University of Texas for the purpose of bringing together students and faculty interested in the study of government and politics. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Kappa Delta Pi, International Honor Society in Education, is a dynamic learning community that recognizes and enhances growth in scholars and leaders as characterized by its three main goals: Recognizing and confirming the status of scholars and educators to achieve and sustain preeminence in teaching, scholarship, and service. ...


Fordham University has chapters of other honor societies which are major specific. An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ...

  • Office of Prestigious Fellowships: The University Office of Prestigious Fellowships helps guide student candidates through the various application processes. It has helped successful students compete for a broad range of scholarships and fellowships, including the Truman Fellowship, Rhodes Scholorship, British Marshall Fellowship, Fulbright, Goldwater, James Madison Fellowship, and Ford Foundation Fellowships, as well as the National Security Education Program (NSEP) and National Science Foundation (NSF) grants.[14]
  • Campion Institute Summer Fellowships: Each year, the Campion Institute (through the Office for Prestigious Fellowships) offers special competitive awards to students who will be competing for external scholarships and fellowships (such as the Rhodes, Marshall, Gates Cambridge, Fulbright, Truman, Goldwater, etc.). These special awards, presented at the end of the spring semester, are available to a select group of students as a way to enrich their intellectual endeavors, build more solid research histories, and help them gain experiences that will ultimately strengthen their applications for the major external competitions. These summer scholarships, available to undergraduate and graduate students, and the specific terms of each award are determined on an as-needed and case-by-case basis (stipend, summer housing, or a combination of both). All summer projects are subject to the approval of the Campion's Summer Fellowship Selection Committee.

The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...

Rankings

In 2008, U.S. News & World Report ranked Fordham 67th [37] among national universities in the United States, up three places from the previous year. U.S. News & World Report also ranked the College of Business Administration 71st in 2008, up nine spots from 2007. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Fordham University School of Law, the 15th most selective law school in the United States, is ranked 25th in the nation in the 2008 U.S. News & World Report law school rankings. Law School Rankings are a specific subset of College and university rankings deal specifically with law schools. ...


While not strictly a "ranking", the editors of Kaplan/Newsweek’s 2008 edition of How to Get Into College Guide included Fordham University as one of the “25 Hottest Schools in America”,[15] with the title "Hottest Catholic School." Kaplan, Inc. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


The Washington Monthly rankings, meant as a public-interest focused alternative to the U.S. News rankings, places Fordham at 41st in the nation, overall.[16] The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ...


In 2007, BusinessWeek magazine ranked Fordham's College of Business Administration 34th nationally and 5th in "Return on Investment." BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ...


In 2004, the Graduate School of Social Service was ranked 14th nationally by U.S. News & World Report.


Fordham grants degrees in the BIMBA program (Beijing International MBA) — the first foreign MBA degree to be approved by the Chinese Government and ranked #1 in China by Fortune Magazine.[17] Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ...


Campuses

Fordham University attracts students from around the world, and at the turn of the 21st century had registered students from approximately 90 countries in addition to every US state and territory.[18] To accommodate this student body, the university has two residential campuses: Rose Hill in the Bronx and Lincoln Center in Manhattan. The University also maintains programs at the Marymount campus in Tarrytown, a biological field station in Armonk, New York and two international locations: The Beijing International MBA (BIMBA) in Beijing, China, and the London Center in the United Kingdom, home to the London Drama Academy.[19] Tarrytown is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Armonk is a census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of North Castle in Westchester County, New York. ...


The undergraduate Fordham College of Liberal Studies holds classes on all three New York campuses, utilizing the same faculty and curriculum as the other colleges in the University. However, it provides options for both full-time and part-time study, unconventional scheduling, and the flexibility of multiple campuses in order to accommodate students who are employed full-time or otherwise unable to take advantage of the offerings at the other undergraduate colleges.


Rose Hill

The Southern Boulevard entrance to the Rose Hill campus.
The Southern Boulevard entrance to the Rose Hill campus.

The Rose Hill campus, established in 1841, is home to the undergraduate Fordham College at Rose Hill, the College of Business Administration, and a portion of the Fordham College of Liberal Studies as well as the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate School of Religion & Religious Education. Located on 85 acres in the north Bronx, it is among the largest "green campuses" in New York City. The campus is bordered by the New York Botanical Garden, the Bronx Zoo, and "Little Italy of the Bronx" on Arthur Avenue. Rose Hill's traditional collegiate Gothic architecture, cobblestone streets, and green expanses of lawn have been used as settings in a number of feature films over the years. Among the 15 campus dormitories are Fordham's three residential colleges: O'Hare Hall,[20] Tierney Hall,[21] and Queen's Court[22] (the last, with its notable Bishop's Lounge, dates back to the days of St. John's College).[23] Finlay Hall, now an upperclassman dormitory, was built in 1905 as home to the (since defunct) medical school,[citation needed]and later was home to the chemistry department for 47 years, until 1968. Another dormitory, Walsh Hall, was built facing the street as a condition of the loan Fordham received from New York City. If Fordham had defaulted on the loan, the city would have converted it into a housing project, however this did not occur, and the building's entrance still confusingly faces the street on the edge of the campus instead of the interior of the campus. Walsh Hall was formerly known simply as 555 due to its address: 555 E.191st Street. The campus is served by the Fordham station of the Metro-North Railroad (the tracks run along the boundary fence), with a southern terminus at Grand Central Station in Manhattan. Public transit buses stop adjacent to campus exits and New York City Subway stations are within walking distance. The University also provides a "Ram Van" shuttle service among the three residential campuses. About 6,284 undergraduates and graduates attend the Rose Hill campus, with 3,143 in residence. Image File history File linksMetadata Fordham_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fordham_800. ... One of the premiere botanical gardens in the United States, the New York Botanical Garden [located at East 200th Street & Kazimiroff Boulevard] spans some 240 acres (1 km²) in the borough of The Bronx, in New York City. ... The Bronx Zoo is a world-famous zoo located within the Bronx Park, in the Bronx borough of New York City. ... Arthur Avenue in the Bronx is the site of one of New York Citys Little Italies, in the Fordham section of the Bronx. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... A cobblestone-covered street Cobblestones are stones used in the pavement of early streets. ... A residential college system is a housing and educational aspect of certain universities across the world, most notably Oxford University and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom; Yale University, Rice University, and the California Institute of Technology in the United States. ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... The Fordham Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the Fordham neighborhood of the Bronx, New York via the Harlem Line and New Haven Line. ... The Metro-North Commuter Railroad Company, or MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by an authority of New York State, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or, more simply, the MTA. Metro-North runs service between New York... The clock in the Main Concourse © 2004 Metropolitan Transportation Authority Grand Central Terminal (often still called Grand Central Station, although technically that is the name of the nearby post office) is a train station at 15 Vanderbilt Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York, a borough of New York City, located... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ...


Lincoln Center

Peter, Fisher of Men statue at the Lincoln Center campus. This image has an uncertain copyright status and is pending deletion. You can comment on the removal.
Peter, Fisher of Men statue at the Lincoln Center campus.
This image has an uncertain copyright status and is pending deletion. You can comment on the removal.

The Lincoln Center campus, established in 1961, is home to the undergraduate Fordham College at Lincoln Center and a portion of Fordham College of Liberal Studies, as well as the School of Law, the Graduate School of Business Administration, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Social Service. The eight-acre campus occupies the area from West 60th Street to West 62nd Street between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues, in the cultural heart of Manhattan. Across the street is one of the world's great cultural centers, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; nearby are Central Park, Broadway, and Columbus Circle. The campus is served by public transit bus stops at the campus entrances, and by the New York City Subway station at 59th Street–Columbus Circle. The University also provides a "Ram Van" shuttle service among its three campuses. About 8,000 professional and undergraduate students attend, with approximately 853 in residence in apartment-style housing.[24] The Lincoln Center campus currently consists of the Leon Lowenstein Building, McMahon Hall dormitory, Gerald M. Quinn Library, and Fordham School of Law. Fordham offices are also housed at 33 W. 60th St and 888 W. 57th St. The Lincoln Center campus also has two outdoor basketball and tennis courts. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1025x768, 456 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1025x768, 456 KB) This image has been (or is hereby) released into the public domain by its creator, Omnibus. ... Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law or Fordham Law School, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in New York City. ... Columbus Avenue is an avenue in New York Citys Upper West Side and is named after Christopher Columbus. ... Tenth Avenue is a north-south thoroughfare on the West Side of Manhattan in New York City. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... View of Columbus Circle, looking east down Central Park South from inside the Time Warner Center. ... 59th Street-Columbus Circle is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line and the IND Eighth Avenue Line. ... Fordham University School of Law, commonly known as Fordham Law or Fordham Law School, is a part of Fordham University and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in New York City. ...


There are two open, grassy plazas at the Lincoln Center Campus, built over the Quinn Library, one level up from the street. The larger plaza is unnamed, but the smaller one is known as Robert Moses Plaza or St. Peter's Garden. A memorial to Fordham students and alumni who died on 9/11 stands in St. Peter's Garden. Ironically, according to Fordham's expansion plan, Robert Moses Plaza may be built over, just as Moses razed and built over the neighborhood where Fordham and Lincoln Center now stand. This is about the urban planner; for other uses, see Robert Moses (disambiguation). ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Marymount

The 25 acre Tarrytown campus was officially established in 2002 when Marymount College consolidated with Fordham University. Marymount College of Fordham University was a small private womens college in the United States, and part of Fordham University. ...


Located 25 miles (40 km) north of New York City in Tarrytown, New York, the campus is home to a branch of Fordham College of Liberal Studies, as well as extensions of the graduate schools of education, social service, and business administration. The campus is served by the Tarrytown station of the Metro-North Railroad, approximately 1-mile (2 km) away, and the Westchester County Bus System ("The Bee-Line"). Westchester County Airport is less than 15 miles (24 km) away. The University also provides a "Ram Van" shuttle among the residential campuses and, as a courtesy, service to The Westchester, The Source At White Plains and the Galleria at White Plains shopping centers. The Tarrytown Metro-North Railroad station serves residents of Tarrytown, New York via the Hudson Line. ... Typical Bee-line transit bus The Bee-Line Bus System is a bus system serving Westchester County, New York. ... FAA diagram of Westchester County Airport (HPN) Westchester County Airport (IATA: HPN, ICAO: KHPN, FAA LID: HPN) is a public airport located approximately 9 miles (14. ... The Westchester is an upscale mall located in White Plains, New York. ... The Source At White Plains is a large shopping complex in White Plains, New York. ... The Galleria at White Plains is an large enclosed urban shopping mall located in the downtown area of White Plains, New York, a large commercial and residential suburb, 20 miles north of New York City and the county seat of Westchester County, New York. ...


Marymount College graduated its final undergraduate class in May 2007, after Fordham University announced in 2005 that the college would be phased out. University administration announced that the campus would remain open for Fordham graduate programs in several disciplines.[25] However, in the fall of 2007 the University announced its intention to seek buyers for the Marymount campus and move its programs to less expansive facilities elsewhere in Westchester. University administration stated that the expenses required to support the programs on campus far exceeded their demand. University officials estimate that the revenue gained from the proposed sale would not be greater than the expenses the University incurred maintaining and improving the campus since its merger with Marymount College.[26] President Father McShane nonetheless stated that the University's decision was a "painful" one.[27] Fordham has since announced the intention to move the remaining programs from the Marymount campus to a new location at 400 Westchester Avenue in Harrison, New York by Fall 2008.[28] Marymount College of Fordham University was a small private womens college in the United States, and part of Fordham University. ... Marymount College of Fordham University was a small private womens college in the United States, and part of Fordham University. ... Harrison is a town/village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ...


Louis Calder Center

The Louis Calder Center is Fordham's biological field station for ecological research and environmental education. Located 30 miles (50 km) north of New York City in Armonk, New York, it is the only exclusively ecological research field station in the New York metropolitan area. The station consists of 113 forested acres with a 10 acre lake and 19 buildings, which are used for laboratory and office space, educational programs, equipment storage, and residences. The station's state-of-the-art equipment, research library, greenhouses, and housing are available for research and educational programs for students, faculty, and visiting scientists.[29] The Louis Calder Center (LCC) is the biological field station of Fordham University. ... Armonk is a census_designated place (CDP) located in the town of North Castle in Westchester County, New York. ... New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island is the most populous metropolitan area in the United States and is also one of the most populous in the world . ...


Beijing, People's Republic of China

Fordham's Beijing campus,[30] founded in 1998, is the site of the Beijing International MBA Program (BIMBA), which enrolls over 400 students a year in traditional part-time and full-time MBA programs, and in Executive MBA (EMBA) programs. Peking University is affiliated with the BiMBA program -- the first foreign MBA degree to be approved by the Chinese Government -- and ranked number 1 in China by Fortune Magazine . Peking redirects here. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is on the politics of Mainland China. ... Categories: Magazines stubs | Time Warner subsidiaries | Business magazines ...


London Center, United Kingdom

London Drama Academy (LDA) at Fordham's Bloomsbury-area London Center offers classes on British acting, using a primarily practical approach. The Academy was founded in the 1970s by Marymount College and a group of tutors from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). Today it offers semester- and year-long sessions, with classes taught by working RADA-trained theater professionals. Bloomsbury is an area of central London between Holborn and Euston station, developed by the Russell family in the 17th and 18th centuries into a fashionable residential area. ... RADAs theatre in London The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in Bloomsbury, London, is considered to be one of the most prestigious drama schools in the world. ...


During the summer, the College of Business Administration holds marketing classes in the Center.


Fordham as a filming location

Movies

Awake is a thriller/drama starring Hayden Christensen and Jessica Alba. ... A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American biographical film about John Forbes Nash, the Nobel Laureate (Economics) mathematician. ... This article is about the 1993 film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... Reverend William OMalley, is an Irish-American, Jesuit Priest,who is considered to be a celeberity of Fordham University. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... The Gambler is a 1974 movie starring James Caan, Lauren Hutton, and Paul Sorvino. ... Kinsey film poster Kinsey is a 2004 semi-biographical film written and directed by Bill Condon. ... Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... Quiz Show is a 1994 film which tells the true story of the Twenty One quiz show scandal of the 1950s. ... The Verdict is a 1982 film which tells the story of a down-on-his-luck lawyer who pushes a medical malpractice case in order to improve his own situation, but discovers along the way that he is actually doing the right thing. ...

Television

Naked City was a television series which aired from 1958 to 1963 on the ABC television network. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ...

Music videos

Ashanti Shequoiya Douglas (born October 13, 1980) is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, actress, dancer, model, and fashion designer who rose to fame in the early 2000s. ... Joseph Antonio Cartagena (born August 19, 1970 in The Bronx, New York, USA[1]), better known by his stage name Fat Joe, is a Puerto Rican-American rapper. ...

Student activities

There are many student activities at Fordham, including the following.[31]


Athletics

Main article: Fordham Rams
Fordham Rams logo
Fordham Rams logo

The Fordham varsity sports teams are known as the "Rams." Their colors are maroon and white. The 22 Fordham University varsity sports teams are known as the Rams. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... This article is about the color. ...


The University supports 22 men's and women's varsity teams and a number of club teams, plus a significant intramural sports program. The Fordham Rams are members of NCAA Division I and compete in the Atlantic 10 Conference in all sports except football. In football, the Rams play in the Patriot League of NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision. The Rams were the 2002 Patriot League co-champions.[32] The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Fordham athletics gained early fame for college football in the beginning of the 20th century, particularly with the success of the famous "Seven Blocks of Granite". In addition, the University launched the careers of dozens of professional baseball players, including a Hall of Fame inductee, Frankie Frisch, known by the further-alliterative nickname, "The Fordham Flash". A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... Francis Frankie Frisch (September 9, 1898 - March 12, 1973), nicknamed the Fordham Flash, was an American Major League Baseball player of the early 20th century and a Baseball Hall of Fame inductee. ...

Student publications

Note: This is not intended to be a comprehensive list

  • Fordham Law Review, the most widely-cited of the law school's six scholarly journals serving the legal profession and the public by discussing current legal issues.
  • Red Rover, a literary magazine published once a year from the Lincoln Center Campus. It provides students with an outlet for creativity and expression through fiction, personal essays, photography, cartoons, poetry, graphic arts, etc.
  • The Ampersand, Fordham's literary magazine
  • The CBA Business Journal, a source of business news and commentary written by and for Fordham University students, publishing three issues per semester.
  • The Fordham Ram (commonly known as The Ram), student newspaper, published from the Rose Hill campus since 1918. The Ram is the University's official journal of record.
  • The Observer, Fordham University's award-winning [38] student newspaper, published from the Lincoln Center campus since 1981.
  • The Paper, Fordham University's journal of news, analysis, comment, and review.
  • The Vagabond, The Ampersand's monthly supplement

Broadcasting

  • WFUV, 90.7 FM in New York City, is Fordham University's 50,000-watt radio station. First broadcast in 1947, the station serves approximately 280,000 listeners weekly in the New York area and thousands more globally on the Web (wfuv.org). The station is a National Public Radio affiliate, and mainly has an adult album alternative format, although it does carry programs which play music from other genres, such as folk music, jazz, and Celtic music.[33] It is staffed by 27 full-time employees and 70 student part-time enployees.[34] The station has strong student-run news and sports departments.
  • Fordham Nightly News (FNN), Fordham University's evening news program since 2004, was created by and is produced by students. FNN is a part of radio WFUV News, and its directors are part-time staff at NBC News, CBS News, CBS Radio. The program is produced 4 nights weekdays (no Wednesday broadcast), and has built up a management structure with about 35 staff -- from on-air talent to technical production. FNN is on a closed-circuit channel, EIC-TV10, and reports current topics including local and international news, entertainment, sports, and weather.[35]

Self-expression

  • The Fordham University Choir is a select mixed ensemble comprised of students from the University's Rose Hill and Lincoln Center campuses. The Choir's repertoire of sacred and secular music is representative of the finest choral tradition. The Choir keeps a full performance schedule that includes five campus concerts and an annual tour. The Choir often performs at various venues in the New York metropolitan area, including Carnegie Hall, the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, and St. Patrick's Cathedral. Highlights of each choir season include the Family Weekend Mass, the Festival of Lessons and Carols each December, and the Spring Concert, which features a major choral work with orchestra. Past performances include Handel's Messiah, Schubert's Mass in G, and Mozart's Requiem. The Choir has performed in many major U.S. cities, such as Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston, San Francisco, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. Internationally, the Choir has performed in Rome, Italy and completed a ten day concert tour through Spain in the spring of 2004.
  • "The Ampersand" is an umbrella organization that encompasses projects such as The Ampersand, Fordham's literary magazine; The Vagabond , The Ampersand's monthly supplement; On the Verge, a writer's workshop; and & What?!?, an open mic night series. The club's primary aim is to create, maintain, and promote a forum in which the Fordham student body can express itself through poetry, prose, short stories, spoken work, photography, and art work.
  • Fordham University Theatre Company: The Fordham Theatre department's training embraces a "company concept," which signifies that all theatre majors may participate in as many productions as they like and in any capacity they wish, as members of the Fordham University Theatre Company.[36] The department produces four "Mainstage" productions each season, and fifteen to twenty-five studio theatre productions. The Mainstage productions are directed and designed by full-time faculty and/or guests from the professional New York theater community. The studio productions are playwriting and directing projects that are completely student-driven, with the support of outside professional directors (playwriting) and mentors (directing). While participation in Mainstage productions is limited to theatre program students, attending performances is a popular activity for all students and the community, and auditions for studio productions are open to students of all majors. (A student may major in any subject and minor in Theatre, which does not require an audition.)
  • The Mimes & Mummers, housed in Collins Auditorium on the Rose Hill Campus, hire professional directors and choreographers to assist with their theatrical productions. "The Mimes" is one of the oldest traditions at the university, and currently produce two top-notch shows per semester, which could be either a comedy, a drama, a musical, or a classic. Students from all major concentrations are welcome to participate in Mimes & Mummers' productions.
  • Fordham Experimental Theatre (FET), located in the Blackbox Theatre in Collins Hall on the Rose Hill Campus, is an entirely student run theatre group, wherein students direct, produce, and perform two shows per semester. Additionally, FET produces two Playwrights' Festivals per year, in which students perform shows written and directed by club members. FET is also an umbrella organization, comprised of the Fordham Experimental Theatre itself, the Fordham Improv Comedy Troupe, and the Fordham Sketch Comedy Troupe. FET embraces an experimental viewpoint, constantly working toward producing shows that challenge the limits of traditional theatre.
  • Expressions Dance Alliance, located in the Keating Basement Dance Studio, was established in 2001 to fill the void of a dance ensemble at Fordham University's Rose Hill Campus. About twenty dancers comprise the dance company with a wide variety of training like hip-hop, ballet, tap, jazz, modern, contemporary, and other areas of dance. The student-run club's main focus is to produce an original show every semester. The members are responsible for every aspect of the show including original choreography, costumes, light designs, sets, budgeting, and publicity. Expressions also participates in community service projects and events around campus. Membership is by audition only. Expressions Dance Alliance also holds dance classes, open to the entire student body.

Rhetoric and debate

  • Fordham Debate Society: Founded in 1852, Fordham Debate Society is based at the Rose Hill Campus and is the oldest existing club in the university, as well the as eighth oldest collegiate debate society in the United States. The society frequently beat Oxford University and Cambridge University in debates during the early 20th century, and more recently was the first American university to host the World Universities Debating Championship (Princeton University and Yale University followed and remain the only other institutions to have the honor of hosting in the United States). Fordham Debate also had top 5 finishes at Nationals, North American Championships, and major tournaments such as those held at Princeton University and Columbia University, all within the first few years of the 21st century. In 1982, the society hosted a massive tournament called the "Fordham Fandango." There, representatives from Fordham, Yale, Princeton, Columbia, the University of Chicago, West Point, and other schools formed the American Parliamentary Debate Association, Inc. (APDA), a student-run intercollegiate debate league. Fordham is still very active on APDA, regularly placing in the top teams in the nation.
  • Gannon Speech & Debate: Based at the Lincoln Center Campus, the organization was constituted and formed by students for the purpose of advancing the social, intellectual and spiritual development of its members and the community of Fordham University, its reputation and image. The club accomplishes these purposes first, by studying colegiate forensics, and second, by preparing for and competing in intercolegiate forensic tournaments. As recently as 2004 members have been awarded prestigious fellowships.[39]

Global outreach

Global Outreach! (commonly known as GO!), is a student led, university sponsored organization dedicated to educating students about issues of social justice and individual responsibility through service trips to global and domestic locations. Separate programs on each campus currently sponsor 27 annual trips ranging from Thailand to East New York, and dealing with such diverse issues as public health, affordable housing, migrant labor, and disaster relief. A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ... The Ram is a student-staffed weekly newspaper of Fordham University - New York Citys Jesuit University. ... WFUV, 90. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... WWWs historical logo designed by Robert Cailliau The World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked, hypertext documents accessed via the Internet. ... NPR redirects here. ... Adult Album Alternative (also Triple-A, AAA, or adult alternative) is a radio format broadcast mostly on FM. A spin off of the Album-oriented rock format, its roots may have been established sometime during the 60s from what was called underground music and later progressive. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Celtic music is a term utilized by artists, record companies, music stores and music magazines to describe a broad grouping of musical genres that evolved out of the folk musical traditions of the Celtic peoples of Northern Europe. ... NBC News endcap, used from 2002 to present. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... CBS Radio Inc. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is found in New York Citys Rockefeller Center, and is lit every December, an event usually broadcast on national television in the United States. ... St. ... The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a format of Christian worship service celebrating the birth of Jesus and traditionally followed at Christmas. ... An Open Mike is a live show where anyone can be an audience member or a performer. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... The World Universities Debating Championship (WUDC) is the largest debating tournament, and one of the largest annual international student events in the world. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Yale redirects here. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The American Parliamentary Debate Association (APDA) is the oldest intercollegiate parliamentary debating association in the United States, and one of two in the nation overall, the other being the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA). ... A modern day speaker addressing an audience through microphones Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... Global Outreach (commonly known as GO!), is a student led organization sponsored by Fordham University and dedicated to educating students about issues of social justice and individual responsibility through service trips to global and domestic locations. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... East New York is a neighborhood in Brooklyn which has had a dramatic turn around prior to 15 years ago. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... A foreign worker (cf expatriate), is a person who works in a country other than the one of which he or she is a citizen. ... Emergency operations or Emergency preparedness is a set of doctrines to prepare civil society to cope with natural or man-made disasters. ...

Military science

Military Science is a program available to all undergraduate and graduate students, regardless of their college or major. The Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program qualifies students for appointment as officers of the US Army, US Army Reserve or US Army National Guard. Students (other than those with ROTC scholarships) attend the first two years of study without incurring any obligation to serve in the military. The regular course of study includes military science classes in addition to the Fordham Core Curriculum and the requirements for the student's chosen major. Additionally, a variety of challenging extracurricular activities are open to all students. These include the regional Ranger Challenge and the international Sandhurst Competitions - intercollegiate "extreme" sports; Color Guard; Pershing Rifles; Drill Team; the Association of the United States Army Ram Company; and an Army Ten-Miler Running Team. Additionally cadets have the opportunity to participate in a variety of military social events, including the annual military ball, called Dining in. New York City Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is hosted at Fordham University, but is available to a number of other academic institutions in New York City who participate at Fordham. ... Military science concerns itself with the study of the diverse technical, psychological, and practical phenomena that encompass the events that make up warfare, especially armed combat. ... ROTC links here. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Army reserves are a part of an army which is normally activated only during emergencies such as a war. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... This article is about various Extreme Sports. ... United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ... A Pershing Rifles color guard competing at the 2004 NATCON drill competition held at Fort Monroe, VA. The Pershing Rifles, a military drill team organization for college-level students, was founded by then 1st Lt. ... In the United States, a drill team is a marching unit that performs military style maneuvers in parades, at air shows, football half-time shows, and other ceremonies. ... The Army Ten-Miler is Americas largest ten-mile race, held every October in Washington, DC and sponsored by the U.S. Army Military District of Washington. ... Mess Night at Camp Lejeune Dining in is a formal military function for Harrison Burrows of a company or other unit. ...


Fordham University traces its history of training cadets for the United States Army to 1885,[37] and has since continued to produce officers from across the nation. Other area academic institutions have affiliations with the Fordham ROTC program, including City College, Columbia University, John Jay College, Lehman College, New School University, New York University, and Polytechnic University. The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... City College of The City University of New York The City College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as the City College of New York or simply City College) is a senior college of the City University of New York, in New York City. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The John Jay College of Criminal Justice is a criminal justice college in New York City which has about 12,000 FTE (full-time equivalent) students, including traditional, pre-career undergraduate students and those pursuing master’s degrees in several disciplines. ... Lehman College is one of the constituent colleges of the City University of New York, USA. Founded in 1931 as the Bronx campus of Hunter College, the school became an independent college within the City University in 1968. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... Polytechnic University (Brooklyn Poly, Poly, or Polytech), located in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City, is the United States second oldest private technological university, founded in 1854. ...


Fordham students may participate in the Air Force ROTC hosted at Manhattan College nearby the Rose Hill campus of Fordham, and the Navy ROTC hosted at Maritime College, State University of New York, also nearby the Rose Hill campus. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... NROTC officers being comissioned The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) program is a college-based, commissioned officers recruitment tool of the United States Navy. ... SUNY Maritime College SUNY Maritime College Seal SUNY Maritime College is located in the Bronx, New York City in historic Fort Schuyler on the Throggs Neck peninsula where the East River meets Long Island Sound. ... Not to be confused with University of the State of New York. ...

Philip H. McGrath House of Prayer

The Philip H. McGrath House of Prayer is located in Goshen, NY, and is used exclusively for Fordham's Retreat Ministries. The McGrath House is situated in a rural, residential area about seventy miles northwest of Fordham's Rose Hill campus. Goshen, New York is a village and a town in Orange County, New York in the USA. Town of Goshen Village of Goshen This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The McGrath House has facilities for a large group of students and retreat coordinators to stay overnight while participating in a Fordham Retreat. Fordham Campus Ministry regularly hosts non-compulsory retreats at the McGrath House, including Emmaus, Kairos, Charis, Global Outreach Retreats, and other specialized retreats. The term retreat has several related meanings, all of which have in common the notion of safety or temporarily removing oneself from ones usual environment. ... Kairos Kairos () is an ancient Greek word meaning the right or opportune moment. The ancient Greeks had two words for time, chronos and kairos. ...

Legacies

Notable alumni

For a more extensive sampling of notable alumni, see the List of Fordham University people.

Among the notable people who have attended Fordham are: Alan Alda, six-time Emmy Award and six-time Golden Globe Award-winning actor; William Casey, former United States Director of Central Intelligence; Mary Higgins Clark, best-selling suspense novelist; Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman Vice Presidential candidate of a major political party; Bob Keeshan, television's multiple award-winning "Captain Kangaroo"; G. Gordon Liddy, lawyer, political operative for President Richard Nixon, leader of the "White House Plumber's unit", political pundit and radio show host; Vince Lombardi, football coaching legend; Charles Osgood, three-time Emmy Award and two-time Peabody Award-winning journalist and Radio Hall of Fame inductee; Vin Scully, Emmy Award-winning sportscaster, Baseball Hall of Famer, and Radio Hall of Famer; and Denzel Washington, two-time Academy Award and two-time Golden Globe Award-winning actor. This is a list of notable alumni of Fordham University, a university in New York State in the United States. ... Alan Alda (born January 28, 1936) is a five-time Emmy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... An Emmy Award. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... William Joseph Casey (March 13, 1913 - May 6, 1987) was the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1981 to 1987. ... The Office of Director of Central Intelligence (DCI) was established on January 23rd 1946 with Adm. ... Mary Theresa Eleanor Higgins Clark Conheeney, best known as Mary Higgins Clark, (b December 24, 1927 in the Bronx, New York) is an American author of suspense novels. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Robert James Keeshan (June 27, 1927 – January 23, 2004) was an actor who was the original Clarabell the Clown on the Howdy Doody television program, but who is most famous as the star and title character of the childrens show Captain Kangaroo. ... Captain Kangaroo was a childrens television series which aired weekday mornings on the American television network CBS from 1955 until 1984, then moved to the American Program Service (now American Public Television, Boston) to air syndicated reruns of past episodes in 1992. ... George Gordon Battle Liddy (born November 30, 1930) was the chief operative for U.S. President Richard Nixons White House Plumbers unit. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Vincent Thomas Lombardi (June 11, 1913 – September 3, 1970) was one of the most successful head coaches in the history of American football. ... Charles Osgood For the American psychologist see Charles E. Osgood. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ... // The National Radio Hall of Fame and Museum, located in the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago, Illinois, is a museum dedicated to recognizing those who have contributed to the development of the radio medium throughout its history in the United States. ... For the American architecture historian, see Vincent Scully. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...

Alan Alda
Photo: Alan Light

A notable fictional alumnus is New York City Deputy Mayor Mike Flaherty (played by Michael J. Fox) from the American television sitcom Spin City (1995-2002). Image File history File links Alan_Alda_Emmys_1994_cropped. ... Alan Alda (born January 28, 1936) is a five-time Emmy Award-winning, six-time Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Public Domain image of Geraldine Ferraro from http://bioguide. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives. ... Image File history File links Denzel_Washington. ... Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. ... For other persons named Michael Fox, see Michael Fox (disambiguation). ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Spin City was an American sitcom television series that ran from 1996 to 2002 on ABC, and was created by Gary David Goldberg & Bill Lawrence, based on a fictional local government running New York City, originally starring Michael J. Fox as Mike Flaherty, the Deputy Mayor of New York. ...

Notable faculty

This list is intended as a sampling

University Presidents

  1. His Eminence John Cardinal McCloskey 1841-43
  2. Most Rev. James Roosevelt Bayley 1844-46
  3. Rev. Augustus J. Thebaud, S.J. 1846-51 and 1859-63
  4. Rev. John Larkin, S.J. 1851-54
  5. Rev. Remigius I. Tellier, S.J. 1854-59
  6. Rev. Edward Doucet, S.J. 1863-65
  7. Rev. William Moylan, S.J. 1865-68
  8. Rev. Joseph Shea, S.J. 1868-74
  9. Rev. William Gockeln, S.J. 1874-82
  10. Rev. Patrick F. Dealy, S.J. 1882-85
  11. Rev. Thomas F. Campbell, S.J. 1885-88 and 1896-1900
  12. Rev. John Scully, S.J. 1888-91
  13. Rev. Thomas Gannon, S.J. 1891-96
  14. Rev. George A. Pettit, S.J. 1900-04
  15. Most Rev. John J. Collins, S.J. 1904-06
  16. Rev. Daniel J. Quinn, S.J. 1906-11
  17. Rev. Thomas J. McCluskey, S.J. 1911-15
  18. Rev. Joseph A. Mulry, S.J. 1915-19
  19. Rev. Edward P. Tivnan, S.J. 1919-24
  20. Rev. William J. Duane, S.J. 1924-30
  21. Rev. Aloysius J. Hogan, S.J. 1930-36
  22. Rev. Robert I. Gannon, S.J. 1936-49
  23. Rev. Laurence J. McGinley, S.J. 1949-63
  24. Rev. Vincent T. O'Keefe, S.J. 1963-65
  25. Rev. Leo J. McLaughlin, S.J. 1965-69
  26. Rev. Michael P. Walsh, S.J. 1969-72
  27. Rev. James C. Finlay, S.J. 1972-84
  28. Rev. Joseph A. O'Hare, S.J. 1984-2003
  29. Rev. Joseph M. McShane, S.J. 2003-present

Fordham traditions

Fordham Maroon

There is as much myth as there is truth surrounding the history of Fordham's college color: Maroon was not the original color, magenta was. Magenta was used on the uniforms of Fordham's "base-ball nines." The color was also used by Fordham's archrival, Harvard.[39] Abbouds Threads book cover Joseph Abboud (born circa 1950) is an award-winning Lebanese-American menswear fashion designer and author who was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Bruce Andrews (born April 1, 1948) is an American poet who was one of the key figures associated with the Language poets (or L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets, after the magazine that bears that name). ... Daniel Berrigan at the Third Annual Staten Island Freedom & Peace Festival, Oct. ... The current version of the article or section is written like a magazine article instead of the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia. ... Joseph Campbell (1879 - 1944) was an Irish poet and lyricist. ... Fianna Fáil - The Republican Party (Pronounced fee-na fall.) (English: Soldiers of Destiny) is the largest political party in the Republic of Ireland. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 - March 7, 1274) was a Catholic philosopher and theologian in the scholastic tradition, who gave birth to the Thomistic school of philosophy, which was long the primary philosophical approach of the Roman Catholic Church. ... His Eminence Avery Robert Cardinal Dulles, S.J. (born August 24, 1918 in Auburn, New York) is currently the Laurence J. McGinley Professor of Religion and Society at Fordham University, a position he has held since 1988. ... For other uses, see Cardinal (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Victor Francis Hess (June 24, 1883 – December 17, 1964) was an Austrian-American physicist. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Steel framework Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (IPA: ) (August 27, 1770 – November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher and, with Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling, one of the representatives of German idealism. ... Paul Levinson, 2002 Paul Levinson (b. ... Basic Information The Plot To Save Socrates was published and copyrighted in 2006. ... The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... Marx is a common German surname. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... “McLuhan” redirects here. ... The media is the message is a phrase meaning that available media shape human activity, more so than what media are used for. ... Reverend William OMalley, is an Irish-American, Jesuit Priest,who is considered to be a celeberity of Fordham University. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted... Diana Mary Villiers Negroponte (born 1947) is trade lawyer and adjunct professor of law at Fordham University whose professional name is Diana Villiers Negroponte. ... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... The Obie Awards, short for Off-Broadway Theater Awards, are annual awards bestowed by the newspaper The Village Voice on theater artists performing in New York City. ... John McCloskey, later John Cardinal McCloskey, (March 10, 1810 - October 10, 1885) born to Irish immigrants, in Brooklyn, was the fifth bishop (second archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... James Roosevelt Bayley, D.D. (August 23, 1814 – October 3, 1877), was the first Bishop of Newark, New Jersey, and the eighth Archbishop of Baltimore. ... Rev. ... Father Joseph M. McShane became the President of Fordham University in the year 2003, after having served as the President of the University of Scranton. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... Magenta is a color made up of equal parts of red and blue light. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


Both institutions claimed prior right to use of magenta, and neither institution was willing to make concessions. Since it was "improper" for two schools to be wearing the same colors, the matter was to be settled by a series of baseball games. The winning team could lay claim to magenta. The losing team would have to find another color. Fordham won, but Harvard reneged on its promise.[39] College baseball is baseball as played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education, predominantly in the United States. ...


That was the situation in 1874 when the student body gathered at the college to meet Rev. William Gockeln, S. J., the newly installed College president. One of the matters discussed at this historic meeting was that of choosing an official college color that would belong to Fordham and Fordham alone. With matters at a standstill, Stephen Wall '75, suggested maroon, a color not widely used at the time.[39]


In a letter that Wall subsequently wrote to the editors of the Fordham Monthly in 1907, he stated, "I was asked what maroon was and the only way I could explain it was that it looked something like claret wine with the sun shining through it, but I said that, if I was given time, I would produce a piece of maroon ribbon. So I was accorded the privilege, and I wrote to my sister to send me a piece of maroon ribbon and velvet. These samples came in due course and were submitted to the committee. It received the unanimous approval of the committee, was adopted and has been the color that has carried Fordham through many a victory."[39] Claret is a name used in English for red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, along the valleys of the rivers Gironde, Garonne and Dordogne, including Medoc, Graves and St Emilion. ...


Ironically, Harvard has since abandoned its official color magenta in favor of crimson.[40] Magenta is a color made up of equal parts of red and blue light. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ...

The Ram

The ram evolved into Fordham's mascot and symbol from a slightly vulgar cheer that Fordham fans sang during an 1893 football game against the United States Military Academy at West Point. The students began cheering "One-damn, two-damn, three-damn...Fordham!" The song was an instant hit, but "damn" was later sanitized to "Ram" to conform to the university's image. [Schroth page 207] Binomial name Shaw, 1804 Synonyms Desmarest Cuvier[1] Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis)[2] is one of three species of mountain sheep in North America and Siberia; the other two species being Ovis dalli, that includes Dall Sheep and Stones Sheep, and the Siberian Snow sheep Ovis nivicola. ... USMA redirects here. ... dAmn (deviantART messaging network) is the name of the real-time chat system implemented on deviantART version 4. ...

The Victory Bell

The "Victory Bell", which is mounted outside the Rose Hill Gym, is from the Japanese aircraft carrier Junyō. According to the plaque below the bell, it was recovered near Saipan where it was "silenced by an aerial Bomb." It was given to Fordham as a gift by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz "as a Memorial to Our Dear Young Dead of World War II." It was blessed by Cardinal Spellman, and "was first rung at Fordham by the President of the United States, the Honorable Harry S. Truman on May 11, 1946, the Charter Centenary of the University." It is rung by each Fordham senior player after victorious home football games and its ringing also marks the start of the commencement ceremonies each May. A small group of students rang the bell on the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor in honor of the war dead. Junyō (Japanese: 隼鷹 junyō meaning peregrine falcon) was a Hiyō-class aircraft carrier of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... Saipan seen from the air A map of Saipan, Tinian & Aquijan Saipan (IPA: in English) is the largest island and capital of the United States Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a chain of 15 tropical islands belonging to the Marianas archipelago in the western Pacific Ocean (15°10... Fleet Admiral Chester William Nimitz GCB (February 24, 1885 – February 20, 1966) was the Commander in Chief of Pacific Forces for the United States and Allied forces during World War II. He was the United States leading authority on submarines, as well as Chief of the Navys Bureau of... Francis Joseph Spellman, later Francis Cardinal Spellman, (May 4, 1889 - December 2, 1967) was the ninth bishop (sixth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ...

The Rose Hill Gymnasium

The Rose Hill Gym
The Rose Hill Gym

The men's and women's basketball teams, as well as the volleyball squad, play in the Rose Hill Gymnasium, the oldest gym still in use at the NCAA Division I level. The 3,200 seat gym opened on January 16, 1925 and was one of the largest on-campus facilities at the time it was built, earning the nickname "The Prairie" because of its large floor space. The arena has been in continuous use by Fordham's basketball teams since its opening with the exception of the World War II years, when it was used as a barracks. Image File history File linksMetadata Fordham_court_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Fordham_court_800. ... Rose Hill Gym is a 3,470-seat multi-purpose arena on the campus of Fordham University in The Bronx, New York City. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ...

The Great Seal

The Great Seal of Fordham University bears the Society of Jesus coat of arms at the center. The shield bears the Greek letters of the name Jesus, IHS, with the cross resting in the horizontal line of the letter "H", three nails beneath (evoking those used in the crucifixion of Jesus), all in gold in a field framed in maroon, the color of the University, with silver fleurs-de-lis (reminiscent of the French origin of the first Jesuit instructors) on the edge of the maroon frame. Around the shield, a scroll with the University's motto in latin, Sapienta et Doctrina (Wisdom and Learning), is etched. The scroll rests on a field in which tongues of fire are displayed, recalling the outpouring of the Holy Spirit of Wisdom that marked the first Pentecost. A laurel above the shield has engraved the names of the disciplines that were taught when the school was granted university status in 1907: arts, science, philosophy, medicine, and law. Surrounding the entire seal is a heraldic belt, which has engraved the name of the school in Latin, Universitas Fordhamensis, and year of foundation.[41] A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... A Christogram is a monogram or combination of letters which forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, and is traditionally used as a Christian symbol. ... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ... Fleurs-de-lys on the flag of Quebec The fleur-de-lis (also spelled fleur-de-lys; plural fleurs-de-lis or -lys) is used in heraldry, where it is particularly associated with the France monarchy (see King of France). ... For other uses, see Scroll (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Laurel may refer to: // Lauraceae, the botanical laurel family, including Bay laurel Laurus nobilis, the original true laurel that is the source of bay leaves used as a seasoning California Laurel Umbellularia californica is a related tree or large shrub True Cinnamon or Ceylon Cinnamon Cinnamomum verum, the inner bark...

William Spain Seismic Observatory

Since 1910, when the Rev. Edward P. Tivnan, SJ, installed a seismograph in the basement of the administration building at the Rose Hill Campus, Fordham has been the site of the oldest seismic station in New York City. William Spain Seismic Observatory has since measured much of the world's natural and unnatural trembling, including earthquakes, China's first atomic explosion in 1964, and local subway trains. Seismographs (in Greek seismos = earthquake and graphein = write) are used by seismologists to record seismic waves. ... The William Spain Seismic Observatory is located in the Bronx, New York at the Rose Hill Campus of Fordham University. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998. ... A 23 kiloton tower shot called BADGER, fired on April 18, 1953 at the Nevada Test Site, as part of the Operation Upshot-Knothole nuclear test series. ... Times Square–42nd Street station entrance The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority , an affiliate of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. ...


The station opened in 1924 and sits at the edge of Edward's Parade in the center of the campus, next to Freeman Hall, home of the department of physics. It is named in honor of a physics student who died in 1922 and whose father donated the funds to build the station.

Songs

Fordham's school song is "Alma Mater Fordham":

O Alma Mater Fordham, How mighty is thy power
to link our hearts to thee in love that grows with every hour.
Thy winding walks, Thy hallowed halls
Thy lawns, Thine ivy-mantled walls;
O Fordham Alma Mater, what mem'ries each recalls.
O Alma Mater Fordham, while yet the life blood starts
Shined by thy sacred image within our heart of hearts.
And in the years that are to be,
May life and love be true to me,
O Fordham Alma Mater, as I am true to thee..[42]

Recordings and other songs

Affiliations

This is an introductory listing, and may reflect only a portion of the many affiliations the University maintains.[43]


Fordham University is affiliated with the following:

It is an accredited member of: The American Council on Education is a United States organization comprising over 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations. ... The National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an umbrella organization of more than 1,000 United States independent higher education institutions. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... The Fulbright Association is a U.S.-based membership organization of Fulbright Program alumni and supporters committed to fostering international awareness and understanding through: Advocating increased worldwide support for Fulbright exchanges; Enriching the Fulbright experience; and Facilitating lifelong interaction among alumni and current participants. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...

The University is also a member of: The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer-based, non-profit association dedicated to educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ... The American Psychological Association (APA) is a professional organization representing psychology in the US. It has around 150,000 members and an annual budget of around $70m. ... The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) was founded in 1954 to accredit teacher certification programmes at U.S. colleges and universities. ...

  • American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education
  • Collegiate Association for Development of Educational Administration (New York State)
  • Association of University Evening Colleges

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]
  3. ^ [3]
  4. ^ [4]
  5. ^ [5]
  6. ^ [6]
  7. ^ [7]
  8. ^ [8]
  9. ^ [9]
  10. ^ [10]
  11. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/Discover_Fordham/Fordhams_Jesuit_Trad/
  12. ^ [11]
  13. ^ [12]
  14. ^ [13]
  15. ^ [14]
  16. ^ [15]
  17. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/Campus_Resources/Public_Affairs/topstories_945.asp
  18. ^ [16]
  19. ^ [17]
  20. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/student_affairs/residential_life/rose_hill/residence_halls/ohare_hall_residenti_19848.asp
  21. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/student_affairs/residential_life/rose_hill/residence_halls/tierney_hall_residen_19851.asp
  22. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/student_affairs/residential_life/rose_hill/residence_halls/queens_court_residen_19849.asp
  23. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/bulletins/pdf/undrgrd_blltn_04_06/fordhm_undrgrd_bulltn_04_06_complete.pdf
  24. ^ [18]
  25. ^ [19]
  26. ^ [20]
  27. ^ [21]
  28. ^ [22]
  29. ^ [23]
  30. ^ [24]
  31. ^ http://www.fordham.edu/student_affairs/student_leadership__/index.asp
  32. ^ [25]
  33. ^ [26]
  34. ^ [27]
  35. ^ [28]
  36. ^ [29]
  37. ^ [30]
  38. ^ [31]
  39. ^ a b c d [32]
  40. ^ [33]
  41. ^ [34]
  42. ^ [35]
  43. ^ [36]

References

  • Fred C. Feddeck. Hale Men of Fordham: Hail!. Trafford Publishing, 2001. ISBN 1-55212-577-7
  • Fordham University Staff, Office of the Sesquicentennial. As I Remember Fordham: Selections from the Sesquicentennial Oral History Project. Fordham University Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8232-1338-2
  • Robert Ignatius Gannon, S.J. Up to the Present: the story of Fordham. Doubleday, 1967. ISBN not available
  • Raymond A. Schroth, S.J. Fordham: A History and Memoir. Jesuit Way, Chicago 2002. ISBN 0-8294-1676-5
  • Thomas Gaffney Taaffe. A History of St. John's College, Fordham, N.Y. The Catholic Publication Society Co., 1891. ISBN not available

External links

Coordinates: 40°51′39″N, 73°53′4″W The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Charlotte 49ers is the name for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. ... The University of Dayton is a private Catholic university operated by the Society of Mary located in Dayton, Ohio. ... The Flyers is the team name for the University of Daytons intercollegiate athletic teams. ... Duquesne University of the Holy Spirit is a private Catholic university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Founded by members of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit, Duquesne (IPA: ) first opened its doors as the Pittsburgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost in October 1878 with an enrollment of 40 students and... Duquesne Dukes is the name of the athletic teams of Duquesne University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... The 22 Fordham University varsity sports teams are known as the Rams. ... The George Washington University (GW), is a private, coeducational university located in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The school was founded in 1821 as The Columbian College in the District of Columbia by Baptist ministers using funds bequeathed by George Washington. ... La Salle University is a private, co-educational, comprehensive university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Named for St. ... La Salle Universitys 23 varsity sports teams, known as the Explorers, compete in the NCAAs Division I and are a member of the Atlantic Ten Conference. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The University of Rhode Island, commonly abbreviated as URI, is the principal public research university in the State of Rhode Island, with its main campus in Kingston, Rhode Island, and three other campuses located throughout the state. ... ... The University of Richmond is a private, nonsectarian, liberal arts university located on the border of the city of Richmond and Henrico County, Virginia. ... The University of Richmond is a member of the NCAAs Division I and is a member of the Atlantic 10 Conference for all sports except football and womens golf, which participate as members of the Colonial Athletic Association. ... St. ... This article is about the university in the United States. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Saint Louis University is a member of the Atlantic Ten Conference. ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... Logo Version - Temple Owl Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania has a prestigious and successful athletic division. ... Xavier University is a private, Jesuit, co-educational Catholic university in the United States located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... Bucknell University is a private university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... Colgate in fall. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... USMA redirects here. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... The Georgetown Hoyas are the athletics teams that officially represent Georgetown University in college sports. ... Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Albert Einstein College of Medicine logo For the engineering company, see AECOM The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. ... The Bank Street College of Education is located in upper Manhattan in New York City. ... For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Berkeley College is a private college specializing in business, with five campuses in New York and New Jersey. ... Boricua College is a post-secondary educational institution located in New York City. ... Bramson ORT College is an undergraduate college in New York City operated by the American branch of the Jewish charity World ORT. Its main campus is in Forest Hills, Queens, with a satellite campus in Brooklyn. ... Brooklyn Law School Brooklyn Law School (BLS) is a law school located in downtown Brooklyn, New York. ... The City University of New York (CUNY; acronym: IPA pronunciation: ), is the public university system of New York City. ... The main entrance of the College of Mount Saint Vincent The College of Mount Saint Vincent is a Catholic liberal arts college located in the Riverdale section of The Bronx, New York. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Barnard College, founded in 1889, is one of the four undergraduate divisions of Columbia University. ... The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is a privately funded college in Lower Manhattan of New York City. ... The General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church is located in Chelsea, Manhattan in New York. ... The Jewish Theological Seminary of America The Jewish Theological Seminary of America, known in the Jewish community simply as JTS, is one of the academic and spiritual centers of Conservative Judaism. ... The Juilliard School is one of the worlds premiere performing arts conservatory located in New York City, it is informally identified as simply Juilliard, and trains in the fields of Dance, Drama, and Music. ... The Kings College is a small Christian institution of higher education, founded by Percy Crawford in Briarcliff Manor, Westchester, in 1938. ... Long Island University (LIU) is a private university located on Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. ... The main entrance to Manhattan College Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City. ... The Manhattan School of Music is one of Americas leading music conservatories located in New York City that offers degrees on the bachelors, masters, and doctoral levels in the areas of classical and jazz performance and composition. ... Marymount Manhattan College is a liberal arts college located in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Founded in 1964,[1] Metropolitan College of New York is comprised of the School for Business, the Audrey Cohen School for Human Services and Education, and the School for Public Affairs and Administration. ... Monroe College is a private college with campuses in the Bronx and New Rochelle, New York. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... The New York Institute of Technology (also known as NYIT and New York Tech) is a private, co-educational college in New York in the USA. The college has three New York campuses, two on Long Island and one on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, as well as global... New York Law School is a private law school in Lower Manhattan in New York City. ... New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... This page is about a medical school in New York. ... Beth Israel Medical Center is a hospital in New York. ... Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university in the New York metropolitan area with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. ... Polytechnic University (Brooklyn Poly, Poly, or Polytech), located in the Borough of Brooklyn in New York City, is the United States second oldest private technological university, founded in 1854. ... Pratt Institute is a specialized, private college in New York City with campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn, as well as in Utica, New York. ... Founders Hall Rockefeller University is a private university focusing primarily on graduate and postgraduate education research in the biomedical fields, located between 63rd and 68th Streets along York Avenue, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan island in New York City, New York. ... St. ... St. ... Saint Josephs College, New York is a private Roman Catholic College in New York, with its main campus located in the borough of Brooklyn, and a branch campus located in Suffolk County, Patchogue, New York. ... The School of Visual Arts Main Building, circa 1992. ... Touro College is a Jewish-sponsored independent institution of higher and professional education, in New York City, New York, United States. ... The tower at Union Theological Seminary Birds-eye view at Claremont Ave. ... Formerly known as the College of Aeronautics, Vaughn College of Aeronautics & Technology is a specialized college located in Queens County, New York in New York City. ... Wagner College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located on Staten Island in New York City. ... The Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College is the medical school and biomedical research unit of Cornell University. ... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... A college (Latin collegium) can be the name of any group of colleagues; originally it meant a group of people living together under a common set of rules (con-, together + leg-, law). As a consequence members of colleges were originally styled fellow and still are in some places. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Westchester County is a primarily suburban county with about 940,000 residents located in the U.S. state of New York. ... This article is about the state. ... Berkeley College is a private college specializing in business, with five campuses in New York and New Jersey. ... Maura Lawn and Ursula Hall at the College of New Rochelles main campus in New Rochelle. ... The College of Westchester (abbreviated CW), located in White Plains, New York, is a career-focused institution that has been providing students with the skills they need for employment for over ninety years. ... Concordia College is a small, Christian liberal arts college, located in Bronxville, New York in Westchester County. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The architectural and administrative centerpiece of the Manhattanville campus, Reid Hall (1864), is named after Whitelaw Reid owner of the New York Tribune. ... Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry campus Mercy College is a private liberal arts college with its main campus in Dobbs Ferry, New York, and satellite locations throughout southeastern New York. ... Monroe College is a private college with campuses in the Bronx and New Rochelle, New York. ... The New York Medical College is a private professional school located in Valhalla, New York. ... Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university in the New York metropolitan area with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... The State University of New York at Purchase, also known as Purchase College and SUNY Purchase, is a public liberal, visual, and performing arts college in Purchase, New York, United States, a part of the State University of New York system. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation)#Education. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... Creighton University is a Jesuit, Catholic university located in Omaha, Nebraska, United States of America. ... University of Detroit Mercy is the largest and most comprehensive Catholic University in Michigan. ... Fairfield University is a private, co-educational undergraduate and masters level university located in Fairfield, Connecticut, in the New England region of the United States. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... Gonzaga University is a private Catholic university located in Spokane, Washington. ... John Carroll University is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area in the United States. ... Le Moyne College is a four-year Jesuit college of approximately 2,300 undergraduate students that uniquely balances a comprehensive liberal arts education with preparation for specific career paths or graduate study. ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... Loyola Marymount University (LMU) is a comprehensive co-educational private Roman Catholic Jesuit university in Los Angeles, California, USA. The University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and one of five Marymount institutions of higher education. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... This article is about Rockhurst University. ... This article is about the university in the United States. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Saint Peters College is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic college in the United States. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Jesuit and Catholic University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... The Santa Clara Mission is a notable on-campus landmark. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ... Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. ... Spring Hill College is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic Jesuit college in the United States. ... Wheeling Jesuit University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... Xavier University is a private, Jesuit, co-educational Catholic university in the United States located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Fordham University (439 words)
Fordham University developed out of Saint John's College, founded by Bishop Hughes upon the old Rose Hill Farm at Fordham, then in Westchester County, and formally opened on St. John the Baptist's Day, 24 June, 1841.
Mary's was practically transferred to Fordham, and, as it had been incorporated in 1820 with all the powers of a university, the history of the present college must be considered to begin with its foundation in that year.
On 21 June, 1904, with the consent of the regents of the University of the State of New York, the board of trustees of St. John's College, during the presidency of Father (now Bishop) John Collins, authorized the opening of a school of law and a school of medicine.
Fordham University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5226 words)
Fordham University was founded as St. John's College in 1841 by the Irish-born Coadjutor Bishop (later Archbishop) of New York, the Most Reverend John Joseph Hughes (nicknamed "Dagger John" because of his personality and the fact that he always drew a dagger-like cross next to his signature).
Fordham University Press, a member the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) since 1938, was established in 1907 not only to represent and uphold the values and traditions of the University itself, but also to further those values and traditions through the dissemination of scholarly research and ideas.
Fordham was the first of the city's institutions involved in the project to fully sign on, purchasing most of the property from West 60th Street to West 62nd Street between Columbus Avenue and Amsterdam Avenue.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m