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Encyclopedia > Footlight Parade
Footlight Parade
Directed by Lloyd Bacon
Produced by Robert Lord
Written by James Seymour
Manuel Seff
Robert Lord (story)
Peter Milne (story)
Starring James Cagney
Joan Blondell
Ruby Keeler
Dick Powell
Music by Harry Warren
(music)
Al Dubin
(lyrics)[1]
Sammy Fain
(music)
Irving Kahal
{lyrics)[2]
Cinematography George Barnes
Editing by George Amy
Release date(s) September 30, 1933
(premiere)
October 21, 1933
(general)
Running time 104 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $703,000 (est.)
IMDb profile

Footlight Parade (1933) is a Warner Bros. musical film starring James Cagney, Joan Blondell, Ruby Keeler and Dick Powell (whose character is almost autobiographical) and featuring Frank McHugh, Guy Kibbee, Hugh Herbert and Ruth Donnelly. The movie was written by Manuel Seff and James Seymour from a story by Robert Lord and Peter Milne. It was directed by Lloyd Bacon. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (427 × 640 pixel, file size: 54 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Footlight Parade poster from Library of Congress Fair Use Rationale: Low Resolution Used for Informational Purposes This image is of a poster, and the copyright for... Lloyd Bacon (1889-1955) was a screen, stage, and vaudeville actor and a film director. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Blondell in Nightmare Alley (1947) Rose Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 - December 25, 1979) was an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Harry Warren (December 24, 1893 - September 22, 1981) was a music composer of many different styles. ... Al Dubin (June 10, 1891 - February 11, 1945) was a Swiss-born lyricist. ... Sammy Fain (Samuel Feinberg, June 17, 1902 - December 6, 1989) was an Jewish-American composer of popular music. ... Irving Kahal, [b 5 March 1903 in Houtzdale, d 7 February 1942 in New York] was a popular lyricist active in the 1920s and 30s. ... Sir George Barnes (1904-1960) was a British broadcasting executive, who was a station Controller of both BBC Radio and later BBC Television in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Starting as a film editor at age 17, George Amy (1903 - 1986) found his niche at Warner Brothers in the 1930s. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... “WB” redirects here. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Blondell in Nightmare Alley (1947) Rose Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 - December 25, 1979) was an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Francis Curray McHugh (May 23, 1898 - September 11, 1981) was an American film and television actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hugh Herbert (b. ... Lloyd Bacon (1889-1955) was a screen, stage, and vaudeville actor and a film director. ...


The spectacular Busby Berkeley musical numbers, written by Harry Warren (music) and Al Dubin (lyrics)[1] and Sammy Fain (music) and Irving Kahal (lyrics),[2] include "By a Waterfall", "Honeymoon Hotel", and "Shanghai Lil". Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... Harry Warren (December 24, 1893 - September 22, 1981) was a music composer of many different styles. ... Al Dubin (June 10, 1891 - February 11, 1945) was a Swiss-born lyricist. ... Sammy Fain (Samuel Feinberg, June 17, 1902 - December 6, 1989) was an Jewish-American composer of popular music. ... Irving Kahal, [b 5 March 1903 in Houtzdale, d 7 February 1942 in New York] was a popular lyricist active in the 1920s and 30s. ...


In 1992, Footlight Parade was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...

Contents

Plot

Footlight Parade tells the story of Chester Kent (James Cagney), who replaces his failing career as a director of Broadway musicals with a new one as the creator of musical numbers called "prologues," short live stage productions presented in movie theaters before the main feature is shown. He faces pressure from his business partners to constantly create a large number of marketable prologues to service theaters throughout the country, but his job is made harder by a rival who is stealing his ideas, probably with assistance from someone working inside his company. Kent is so overwhemed with work that he doesn't that realize his secretary, Nan (Joan Blondell), has fallen in love with him, and is doing her best to protect him. James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Blondell in Nightmare Alley (1947) Rose Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 - December 25, 1979) was an Oscar-nominated American actress. ...


Kent's business partners announce that they have a big deal pending with the Apolinaris theater circuit, but getting the contract depends on Kent impressing Mr. Apolinaris with three spectacular prologues, presented on the same night, one after another at three different theatres. Kent then stages "Honeymoon Hotel", "By a Waterfall", featuring the famous 'Human Waterfall', and "Shanghai Lil", featuring Cagney and Ruby Keeler dancing together. Honeymoon Hotel is a cartoon in the Warner Bros Merrie Melodies series produced in 1934. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ...


Cast

  • James CagneyChester Kent, creator of musical prologues
  • Joan BlondellNan Prescott, his secretary
  • Ruby KeelerBea Thorn, dancer turned secretary turned dancer
  • Dick PowellScott 'Scotty' Blair, juvenile lead, former protege of Mrs. Gould
  • Frank McHughFrancis, dance director
  • Ruth Donnelly – Harriet Bowers Gould, the producer's nepotistic wife
  • Guy KibbeeSilas 'Si' Gould, producer
  • Hugh HerbertCharlie Bowers, Mrs. Gould's brother, the censor
  • Claire DoddVivian Rich, Nan's friend, a gold digger
  • Gordon Westcott – Harry Thompson, Kent's assistant
  • Arthur Hohl – Al Frazer, the other producer
  • Renee Whitney – Cynthia Kent, Kent's ex-wife
  • Barbara Rogers – Gracie, a dancer
  • Paul Porcasi – George Apolinaris, owner of a chain of movie theaters
  • Philip Faversham – Joe Barrington, juvenile lead, protege of Mrs. Gould
    James Cagney and Ruby Keeler in"Shanghai Lil" from Footlight Parade 1933
    James Cagney and Ruby Keeler in
    "Shanghai Lil" from Footlight Parade 1933
    Busby Berkeley's 'By a Waterfall"
    production number from
    Footlight Parade 1933
  • Herman Bing – Fralick, the music director
  • Billy BartyMouse and Little Boy
  • Hobart CavanaughTitle-Thinkerupper
Cast notes
  • Dorothy Lamour and Ann Sothern were among the many chorus girls in the film. It was Lamour's film debut.
  • It is often written that John Garfield made his (uncredited) film debut in this film, but experts were divided if it was actually him in the very quick (5/6ths of a second) shot.[3][4] According to the 2003 Turner Classic Movies documentary The John Garfield Story, it is not Garfield.

James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Blondell in Nightmare Alley (1947) Rose Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 - December 25, 1979) was an Oscar-nominated American actress. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ... Richard Ewing Dick Powell (November 14, 1904 – January 2, 1963) was an American singer, actor, producer, and director. ... Francis Curray McHugh (May 23, 1898 - September 11, 1981) was an American film and television actor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hugh Herbert (b. ... Claire Dodd on the cover of Picturegoer Magazine Claire Dodd (December 29, 1908 - November 23, 1973) was a successful film actress. ... James Francis Cagney, Jr. ... Ruby Keeler, born Ethel Hilda Keeler, (August 25, 1909 – February 28, 1993), was an actress, singer, and dancer most famous for her on-screen coupling with Dick Powell in a string of successful early musicals at Warner Brothers. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ... Hobart Cavanaugh (September 22, 1886 – April 27, 1950) was an American character actor in film. ... Dorothy Lamour (December 10, 1914 – September 22, 1996) was an American motion picture actress. ... Ann Sothern Ann Sothern (January 22, 1909 – March 15, 2001) was an American film actress. ... John Garfield (March 4, 1913 – May 21, 1952) was an Academy Award nominated American actor. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ...

Musical numbers

  • "Honeymoon Hotel" – by Harry Warren (music) and Al Dubin (lyrics)
  • "Shanghai Lil" – by Harry Warren (music) and Al Dubin (lyrics)
  • "By a Waterfall" – by Sammy Fain (music) and Irving Kahal (lyrics)
  • "My Shadow" – by Sammy Fain (music) and Irving Kahal (lyrics)
  • "Ah, the Moon Is Here" – by Sammy Fain (music) and Irving Kahal (lyrics)
  • "Sitting on a Backyard Fence" – by Sammy Fain (music) and Irving Kahal (lyrics)[5]

Honeymoon Hotel is a cartoon in the Warner Bros Merrie Melodies series produced in 1934. ...

Production

Early casting had Stanley Smith playing the juvenile lead eventually played by Dick Powell, and Dorothy Tennant playing Mrs. Gould instead of Ruth Donnelly. Other actors considered for various roles included Eugene Pallette, George Dobbs and Patricia Ellis. Remarkably, consider that his musical numbers are the highlight of the film, Busby Berkeley was not the original choice to choreograph - Larry Ceballos was signed to direct the dance numbers, and sued Berkeley and the studio for $100,000 for breach of contract when he was not allowed to do so. (Ceballos also claimed to have created a number later used in the Warner Bros. film Wonder Bar, which was credited to Berkeley.) Stanley Smith was a NASCAR driver. ... Dorothy Tennant (1855-1926), was a Victorian Neoclassicist painter born in London, UK. In 1890, she married the African explorer Henry Morton Stanley, and became known as Lady Stanley. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Wonder Bar is a 1934 movie adaptation of a Broadway musical of the same name. ...


Cagney's character, Chester Kent, was modelled after Chester Hale, a well-known impresario at the time, and the offices he worked in were based on the Sunset Boulevard offices of the prologue production company "Fanchon and Marco" in Los Angeles.[3]


Footlight Parade was shot at the Warner Bros. studio in Burbank, California, and cost an estimated $703,000 to make. It premiered on 30 September 1933, and was released generally on 21 October.[6][7][8] For the community in Santa Clara County, California, see Burbank, Santa Clara County, California. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1932 in film 1933 1934 in film 1930s in film years in film film // Events British Film Institute founded. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Pre-code era

The film was made during the Pre-Code era, and its humor is sometimes quite risqué, with multiple references to prostitution and suggestions of profanity largely unseen in studio films until the 1960s, when the Production Code collapsed. Pre-Code films were created before the Motion Picture Production Code or Hays Code took effect on 1 July 1934 in the United States of America. ... The Production Code (also known as the Hays Code) was a set of industry guidelines governing the production of American motion pictures. ...


One character in the film, played by actor Hugh Herbert acts as the censor for Kent's productions, constantly telling Kent certain parts of his production numbers have to be changed. His character is portrayed as buffoonish and comical, saying disagreeable lines to Kent such as "You must put brassieres on those dolls..." (referring to actual dolls) "...uh uh, you know Connecticut." This character foreshadows the coming Production Code, which was in full force less than a year later. Hugh Herbert (b. ... Bra - front Bra - back A brassiere ( ; , commonly referred to as a bra, ) is an article of clothing that covers, supports, and elevates the breasts. ...


Quotes

Chester Kent: "Aw, talking pictures, it's just a fad."


Notes

  1. ^ a b All Movie Guide Overview
  2. ^ a b TCM Full Credits
  3. ^ a b TCM "Footlight Parade" notes
  4. ^ IMDB Trivia for "Footlight Parade"
  5. ^ TCM Music
  6. ^ IMDB Business Data for "Footlight Parade"
  7. ^ IMDB Release Dates for "Footlight Parade"
  8. ^ TCM Overview for "Footlight Parade"

External links

For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Kaleidoscopic Choreography from Footlight Parade, 1933 Busby Berkeley (November 29, 1895 – March 14, 1976), born William Berkeley Enos in Los Angeles, California, was a highly influential Hollywood movie director and musical choreographer. ... A Connecticut Yankee was a 1927 musical by Rogers and Hart, based upon A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthurs Court, a novel by American humorist Mark Twain. ... Present Arms is a Broadway musical comedy that opened April 26, 1928, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart and book by Herbert Fields. ... Earl Speedo Carroll (Born November 2, 1937[1]) is the lead vocalist for the doo wop group The Cadillacs. ... A rainbow is an optical or meteorological phenomenon. ... The Street Singer was a 1912 short silent film drama. ... Whoopee! is a Broadway musical comedy which debuted on 4 December 1928. ... Look up Kiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Palmy Days is a 1931 movie starring Eddie Cantor. ... Girl Crazy is a theater musical with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin and book by Guy Bolton and John McGowan. ... 42nd Street is a 1933 musical film, set on the famous Manhattan street of that name, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. ... Gold Diggers of 1933 is an American musical film directed by Mervyn LeRoy with choreography by Busby Berkeley. ... Roman Scandals Roman Scandals is a 1933 film starring Eddie Cantor, Ruth Etting, and Gloria Stuart. ... A statue of an armoured knight of the Middle Ages For the chess piece, see knight (chess). ... Wonder Bar is a 1934 movie adaptation of a Broadway musical of the same name. ... Gold Diggers of 1935 is a Warner Bros. ... Bright Lights may refer to: The Bright Lights Film Journal Bright Lights Records Bright Lights, a 1986 My Little Pony serial Bright Lights, a 2004 song by Matchbox Twenty I Want to See the Bright Lights Tonight, a 1974 album by Richard and Linda Thompson Turn on the Bright Lights... In Caliente, also known as Viva Señorita, is a 1935 film written by Ralph Block, directed by Lloyd Bacon, and starred Dolores del Río. ... This page may refer to: Stage Struck (album), a live album by Rory Gallagher released in 1980. ... Varsity Show is a 1937 feature film from Warner Brothers about a group of students at Winfield College who butt heads with their faculty advisor while producing an annual stage show. ... The Wizard of Oz (film) redirects here. ... Strike Up The Band may refer to: Strike Up The Band, a 1927 song by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin written for a Broadway musical by the same name Strike Up the Band, a 1940 MGM musical directed by Busby Berkeley and starring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney Strike Up... For the aircraft of this name, see Lady be Good (aircraft). ... Ziegfeld Girl is a 1941 American film starring James Stewart, Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr and Lana Turner. ... Babes on Broadway is a 1941 musical movie starring Judy Garland, Mickey Rooney, Fay Bainter, and Virginia Weidler and directed by Busby Berkeley. ... For Me and My Gal is a 1942 American musical directed by Busby Berkeley. ... ... The Gangs All Here is a 1943 musical film produced and released by Twentieth Century Fox. ... Annie Get Your Gun is a 1950 American musical film loosely based on the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. ... Call Me Mister was a Broadway revue with sketches by Arnold Auerbach and words and music by Harold Rome. ... The Blue Veil is a 1951 film which tells the story of a child torn between the competing claims of her birth mother versus his adoptive mother. ... Rose Marie is an operetta with music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart, and a libretto by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II. The work was first produced on Broadway on September 2, 1924, running for a very successful 557 performances. ... No, No, Nanette is an English musical comedy with lyrics by Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach, music by Vincent Youmans, and a book by Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. ...

 
 

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