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Encyclopedia > Football in England

Football is the national sport of England, and as such has an important place within English national life. The sport is almost always referred to simply as football; it is unusual for it to be called soccer and it is only referred to as "association football" in very limited circumstances. Any unqualified reference to football in an English context should be read as a reference to association football rather than to any other member of the football family of sports. The only other members of this family played to any great extent in England belong to the rugby football sub-family, and are usually referred to as rugby. The title and remainder of this article refers to football in its English sense. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 515 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,775 × 1,786 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 515 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,775 × 1,786 pixels, file size: 3. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... A national sport is a sport or game that is considered to be a popularly intrinsic part of the culture or is the most popular sport of a country or nation. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Culture of England is sometimes difficult to separate clearly from the culture of the United Kingdom, so influential has English culture been on the cultures of the British Isles and, on the other hand, given the extent to which other cultures have influenced life in England. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ...


Kicking ball games are described in England since at least 1280. England can boast the earliest ever documented use of the English word "football" (1409) and the earliest reference to football in French (1314). A description of an exclusively kicking ball game from Nottinghamshire in the fifteenth century bears similarity to football. There is good evidence for refereed, team "foteball" games being played in English public schools since at least 1581.[1] The modern global game of football was first codified in 1863 in London by the English Football Association, the oldest football association in the world. The modern passing game is believed to have been innovated in London in the early 1870s.[2][3] England is home to the oldest association football clubs in the world (dating from at least 1857), the world's oldest competition (the FA Cup founded in 1871) and the first ever football league (1888). For these reasons England is considered the home of the game of football. [4] Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ... Sheffield F.C. are an amateur English football club, whose main claim to fame is the fact that they are the worlds oldest club, having been established in 1857. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ...

Contents

League system

The Football League, established in 1888 by Aston Villa director William McGregor, was the first professional football league in the world. Since its founding, however, many other leagues have been founded in England. Over recent years there has been an increasing effort to link all these leagues together in a Pyramidal structure allowing promotion and relegation between different levels. The primary motivation for this drive is to maintain the possibility that any club in England may dream of one day rising to the very top, no matter what status they currently hold. There are around 40,000 clubs registered with the FA - this is 11,000 more than any other country; even without taking relative population into account, England has more football clubs than any other country in the world.[5] The English football league system, otherwise known as the football pyramid, is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in England (although for historical reasons a small number of Welsh clubs also compete). ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ... Aston Villa Football Club play at Villa Park in Birmingham, England. ... For the Canadian businessman and political figure, see William McGregor (politician) William McGregor (1847 – 1911) was Director of Aston Villa. ... The English football league system, otherwise known as the football pyramid, is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in England (although for historical reasons a small number of Welsh clubs also compete). ...


Premier League

The Premier League was founded in 1992 after England's top clubs broke away from the Football League in a successful effort aimed at increasing their income at the expense of clubs in the lower divisions. Links with The Football League were maintained, and each season the bottom three clubs are relegated from the Premier League and replaced by three from the Championship. For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ...


The Football League

Although the oldest league in the world, The Football League now ranks second in the hierarchy of English football after the split of England's top clubs in 1992 to form the FA Premier League. The Football League has 72 member clubs evenly divided among three divisions, currently named the Championship, League One and League Two. The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... Football League One (often referred to as League One for short or Coca-Cola Football League 1 for sponsorship reasons) is the second-highest division of The Football League and third-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... Football League Two (often referred to as League Two for short or Coca-Cola Football League 2 for sponsorship reasons) is the third-highest division of The Football League and fourth-highest division overall in the English football league system. ...


English football league system

Below the Football League is what is commonly known as "non-League football". This term is confusing, as it refers to those clubs outside the (Football) League, although they still play in organised league competitions. In recent years, the top few levels have been consolidated into the National League System, operated by the FA. Most clubs in the Conference National division are fully professional, the remainder are semi-professional. The English football league system, otherwise known as the football pyramid, is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in England (although for historical reasons a small number of Welsh clubs also compete). ... Non-league football refers to football in England played at a level below that of the FA Premier League and The Football League. ... The National League System comprises the seven levels of the English football league system immediately below the level of the FA Premier League and The Football League. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ...


There is automatic promotion and relegation between League Two and Conference National, and for several levels below the Conference, although this becomes more irregular further down the league system. The non-League system is often known as the "pyramid", because the number of leagues at each level begins to increase as you go down through the levels, with each league covering a smaller geographic area.


Amateur football

Although the Football Association abandoned a formal definition of "amateur" in the early 1970s, the vast majority of clubs still effectively play as amateurs, with no financial reward. The Amateur Football Alliance is the largest organised of such competitions, being particularly strong in the London area. One view of the split. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Smaller-sided versions of the game such as five-a-side and Futsal are becoming increasingly popular too. These are often played informally, but there are many competitive small-sided leagues running across the country.


Reserve leagues

Many teams operate reserve teams in separate leagues; in some lower levels of the pyramid, reserve teams play against first teams. The top division for reserve teams of professional clubs is the FA Premier Reserve League. Beneath that operate the Central League, and the Football Combination, which cover the north and south of England respectively. The FA Premier Reserve League is the top reserve team league for the top English football teams in the FA Premier League. ... The Central League (more commonly known as the Pontins League after its main sponsor) is a football league in England for reserve teams of Football League clubs. ... The Football Combination (commonly referred to as the Pontins Holidays Combination for sponsorship reasons, and formerly known as the Avon Insurance Combination) is a football competition for the reserve teams of English Football League clubs from Southern England and Wales. ...


Youth leagues

Many club sides have Academy (youth) teams; the top level of youth football is the FA Premier Academy League, consisting of Premier League and Football League club's Academy sides, which operates at U18 and U16 levels (although the latter is non-competitive). The next level below the Academy League is the Football League Youth Alliance, in which the remainder of Football League clubs field their youth teams. There is also the FA Youth Cup, a nationwide cup competition for U18 teams. The FA Premier Academy League is the top level of youth football in England. ... The Football League Youth Alliance (known sometimes as the Puma Youth Alliance after its sponsors, Puma) is the second tier of youth football competition in England, beneath the FA Premier Academy League. ... The Football Association Youth Challenge Cup is an English football competition run by The Football Association for under-18 sides. ...


Beyond organised football

Football in England is not just a spectator sport or the preserve of official leagues and clubs, but a sport attracting mass participation at many different levels and in a wide variety of forms, including Sunday league football and five-a-side football. It has been suggested that Pub team be merged into this article or section. ... Five-a-side football is a variation of football (soccer) in which each team fields five players (four outfield players and a goalkeeper), rather than the usual eleven. ...


Cup competitions

The two most important cup competitions in England are the FA Cup and the League Cup, but several other national cups are targeted at clubs at different levels.


The FA Cup, first held in 1872, is the oldest and most respected national cup competition in the world. It is open to around 600 clubs in the higher levels of the pyramid. The FA Community Shield is played each August as a one-off match between the FA Cup winners and the Premier League champions. This article is about the English FA Cup. ... For the rugby league competition, see Charity Shield (rugby league) The Football Association Community Shield (formerly the Charity Shield) is an English association football trophy contested in an annual match between the champions of the FA Premier League and the winners of the FA Cup. ...


The League Cup (currently known as the Carling Cup) is England's second major cup competition, and is contested by the 92 Premier League and Football League clubs. The winners of both main cup competitions qualify for the UEFA Cup, and both are considered as important tournaments. The Football League Cup, commonly known as the League Cup, is an English football competition. ...


The Football League Trophy is a competition for clubs in Football League One and Football League Two. The Football League Trophy is the generic name of an English football competition for clubs in the two lower divisions of The Football League and, in some seasons, the leading sides in the Conference National. ...


The FA Trophy is open to clubs in the top four levels of the National League System, and the FA Vase is for clubs in the next couple of levels below that. These competitions replaced the FA Amateur Cup, which was the leading competition for amateur non-League teams for many years. Representative teams from leagues lower still, mostly at county level, contest the FA National League System Cup, and the FA Sunday Cup is for Sunday league football teams. The Football Association Challenge Trophy is an English football competition for clubs playing in the Football Conference, Southern League, Isthmian League, and Northern Premier League. ... The Football Association Challenge Vase is an annual football competition for teams playing in the lower regional leagues of England. ... The FA Amateur Cup was an English football competition. ... The FA National League System Cup is a new football competition run by The Football Association. ... About the FA Sunday Cup Prior to 1955, The Football Association did not permit clubs or players under its jurisdiction to take part in competitive football played on Sunday. ... It has been suggested that Pub team be merged into this article or section. ...


Defunct national cup competitions include:

The Full Members Cup was an English football cup competition held from 1985 to 1992. ... The Super Cup (known under its sponsored name as the ScreenSport Super Cup) was a one-off football competition held in England in the 1985-86 season. ... The Anglo-Italian Cup was a football cup competition held between clubs in England and Italy. ... The Anglo-Scottish Cup was a tournament arranged for eight of the best teams in English and Scottish football leagues during the summer for several years during the 1970s. ... The Texaco Cup was a cup competition that involved clubs from the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland that had not qualified for European competions. ... The Watney Mann Invitation Cup (normally referred to as simply the Watney Cup) was a short-lived English football tournament held in the early 1970s. ...

Qualification for European competitions

See also: English clubs in European football

Clubs who do well in either the Premier League, FA Cup or League Cup can qualify to compete in various UEFA-organised Europe-wide competitions in the following season (as well as continuing to play in domestic competitions). The number of English clubs playing in Europe in any one season can range from seven to eleven, depending on the qualification scenarios. Currently, England is awarded the following places in European competitions: The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ...

Competition Who Qualifies Notes
UEFA Champions League Club finishing 1st in the Premier League
Club finishing 2nd in the Premier League
UEFA Champions League Third Qualifying Round Club finishing 3rd in the Premier League
Club finishing 4th in the Premier League Ordinarily, the fourth-place Premier League club automatically earns a spot in the Champions League qualifying rounds. However, a fourth-place performance will not grant the fourth-place finisher a place in the Champions League competition should another, below-fourth-place-finishing Premier League club have also been the previous season's Champions League winner. This is because winners of the Champions League competition earn automatic qualification for the following season's Champions League event, regardless of their performance in their club league. Therefore, in such a case, the fourth-place Premier League club would qualify only for the UEFA Cup.
UEFA Cup Club finishing 5th in the Premier League If the fifth-placed club has already qualified for Europe through the FA Cup or League Cup, then the next-highest Premier League finishers get this place
FA Cup winners If the FA Cup winners have already qualified for Europe by a high Premier League finish or by winning the League Cup, then the FA Cup runners-up receive this place; if the runners-up have also already qualified, then the highest-finishing Premier League club to have not qualified for Europe gets the place
League Cup winners If the League Cup winners have already qualified for Europe by a high Premier League finish, then the next highest-finishing Premier League club gets this place
Any English club that wins the UEFA Cup and has not already qualified for the Champions League or UEFA Cup By the UEFA Cup regulations (Regulation 1.07), this club's entry into the UEFA Cup will not be at the expense of any other entries to which its national federation is entitled
UEFA Cup First Qualifying Round FA Premier League club with the best UEFA Fair Play ranking that has not already qualified for Europe, but only if England has the best fair play ranking or has a fair play score of above 8 and is one of the two countries drawn out of the hat
UEFA Intertoto Cup Final Round Club finishing highest in the Premier League to have entered and not qualified for any other European competition If the club finishes lower than four places below the last club to have qualified for the UEFA on the basis on league position, this place will be reallocated to another country; conversely, if another country does not take up their Intertoto Cup allocation, England may receive two places in the competition

In addition, once in a European competition, it becomes possible to qualify for others: European Cup redirects here. ... For the current season, see UEFA Cup 2007-08. ... The UEFA Fair Play ranking is used by UEFA to grant three berths for the first qualifying round of the UEFA Cup. ... The UEFA Intertoto Cup, also abbreviated as UI Cup, is a summer football competition for European clubs that have not qualified for one of the two major UEFA competitions, the Champions League and the UEFA Cup. ...

  • All the winners of the Champions League Third Qualifying Round go forward to the Champions League
  • All the losers of the Champions League Third Qualifying Round go forward to the UEFA Cup
  • All the winners of the UEFA Cup Second Qualifying Round go forward to the UEFA Cup
  • All the winners in the Intertoto Cup Final Round go forward to the UEFA Cup Second Qualifying Round
  • Any clubs playing in the Champions League that finish third in the group stage go into the UEFA Cup Third Round

England national team

First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in...

Women's football

The first recorded women's football match in England was more than 100 years ago but it is only in recent years that women's football has begun to receive some serious attention, in the form of televised matches (such as the FA Women's Cup final and matches of the national team), international games being held at larger stadia and, to a lesser extent, the comedy film Bend It Like Beckham. Association football is the unofficial national sport of England. ... The Football Association Women’s Challenge Cup Competition, commonly referred to as the FA Womens Cup, is the top cup competition for womens football clubs in England - designed as an exact equivalent to the FA Cup. ... First International Scotland 2-3 England (Greenock, Scotland; November 19, 1972) Largest win Hungary 0-13 England (Tapolca, Hungary; October 27, 2005) Worst defeat Norway 8-0 England (Moss, Norway; June 4, 2000) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1995) Best result Quarter-finals, 1995 Olympic Games Appearances None; not... Bend It Like Beckham is a British film released in 2002 in the UK and released in the United States in March 2003. ...


Burton Brewers' 57-0 loss against Willenhall Town on March 4, 2001 in the West Midland Regional Women's Football League, Division One North may be a British record for the biggest defeat in a football match [1]. is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


History of English football

For more details on this topic, see History of English football.

The modern global game of Football was first codified in 1863 in London. The impetus for this was to unify English public school and university football games. There is evidence for refereed, team football games being played in English schools since at least 1581. An account of an exclusively kicking football game from Nottinghamshire in the fifteenth century bears similarity to association football. England can boast the earliest ever documented use of the English word "football" (1409) and the earliest reference to the sport in French (1314). The modern passing game is believed to have been innovated in London [6][7] and England is home to the oldest football clubs in the world (dating from at least 1857), the world's oldest competition (the FA cup founded in 1871) and the first ever association football league (1888). For these reasons England is considered the home of the game of football. The History of English football is a long and detailed one, as it is not only the national sport but England was where the game was developed and codified. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ...


Football was played in England as far back as medieval times, with the first account of a football-like game coming in 1280, and references to "foot balls" dating as far back as 1314. By the 16th centuries references to organised teams and goals had appeared. The 19th century saw the origins of codification of the game, by members of the nation's public schools and universities//. The Cambridge Rules were created in 1848[citation needed], the Sheffield rules in 1857 and the Football Association was founded in 1863. That led to the foundation of the FA Cup in 1871, and the England team played the world's first international match, against Scotland, the following year. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A football is used to play one of the different sports known as football or Rugby. ... Look up goal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... The Cambridge Rules, were a code of football drawn up at Cambridge University in 1848 by H. de Winton and J. C. Thring. ... The Sheffield Rules were a code of football devised and played in the English city of Sheffield between 1857 and 1878. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... First international Scotland 0–0 England  (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win Scotland 11–0 Ireland  (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 February 1901) Biggest defeat  Uruguay 7–0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First...


The late nineteenth century was dominated by the growing split between the amateur and professional teams, which was roughly aligned along a North-South divide; northern clubs were keen to adopt professionalism as workers could not afford to play on an amateur basis, while Southern clubs by the large part stuck by traditional "Corinthian" values of amateurism. Eventually, in 1885 the FA legalised professionalism, which led in turn to the foundation of the Football League by twelve clubs in 1888. Preston North End were inaugural winners in 1888-89, and also were the first team to complete the Double. Aston Villa repeated the feat in 1896-97. In the United Kingdom the term North-South divide refers to an economic and cultural divide between the relatively wealthy South East of England and the less affluent industrial areas of Scotland, Wales, Northern England and the Midlands of England. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Amateur. ... The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ... Preston North End Football Club are an English professional football club located in the Deepdale area of the city of Preston, Lancashire, currently playing in the second tier of English league football, The Championship. ... The 1888-1889 season was the 18th season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The Double is a term in football, which refers to winning a countrys top division and its main cup competition in the same season. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


The League expanded over the next 25 years as football boomed in England, from one division of twelve teams in 1888, to two divisions of 40 by 1914; during this time sides from the North and Midlands dominated, with Aston Villa, Sunderland, The Wednesday and Newcastle United all winning three or more league titles in the period leading up to World War I. During hostilities, competitive football was suspended but games were still played at a regional and less official level. Sunderland Association Football Club is a professional football club, based at the Stadium of Light in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, in North-East England. ... SWFC redirects here. ... For the Australian club, see Newcastle United Jets. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The inter-war years were dominated by Huddersfield Town, Everton and Arsenal, who won 11 of the 18 league titles contested between them, with Huddersfield and Arsenal each grabbing a hat-trick, and Arsenal taking five in total, as well as two FA Cups. The national stadium at Wembley was opened in 1923, with the "White Horse Final" being the first FA Cup final to be played there. By the turn of the thirties, the League expanded to include two whole new divisions and 88 clubs, and the national side started to play sides from outside the British Isles. However, the FA's resignation from FIFA in 1928 meant that England did not contest any of the first three World Cups. Huddersfield Town Football Club is an English football club formed in 1908 and based in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire. ... Everton Football Club is an English football club located in the city of Liverpool. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... For the new stadium, see Wembley Stadium. ... Crowds define the edges of the pitch and watch from the roof. ... This article describes the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... This article is about an international football organization. ... The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football (soccer) competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA...


The post-war years were dominated first by Manchester United (three titles and an FA Cup) and Wolverhampton Wanderers (two titles and two FA Cups), although the former's progress was halted by the 1958 Munich air disaster. However, during this time English football was being outstripped abroad; England lost 1-0 to the United States at the 1950 World Cup, and then 6-3 to Hungary at Wembley in 1953. English clubs had little success in the European club competitions set up; The Football Association and the Football League persuaded the 1955 English champions Chelsea from participating in the first European Cup competition (1955/56). Chelsea's successors as English champions, Manchester United ignored such advice and reached the semi-final of the 1957 European Cup, where they lost to the eventual winners Real Madrid. The following season, United defeated Red Star Belgrade in the quarter final only to be decimated in the Munich Air Disaster when returning from Belgrade. Their patched-up team proved no match for A.C. Milan in the semi-finals. Subsequent European Cup campaigns by Wolverhampton Wanderers in 1959 and 1960 ended in the first round and the quarter finals respectively. A London XI and Birmingham City did reach the finals of the first two Inter-Cities Fairs Cup tournaments. Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club are an English professional football club based in Wolverhampton, West Midlands. ... A plaque at Old Trafford Football Ground remembering the Munich air disaster The Munich air disaster took place on February 6, 1958, when the British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at the Munich-Riem airport in Germany. ... Joe Gaetjens held aloft after scoring the winning goal On June 29, 1950, at the 1950 World Cup in Brazil, the United States national football team defeated the English team 1–0 in group play. ... Qualifying countries The 1950 FIFA World Cup was the only one not decided by a knockout final. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ... The Football League is a league competition featuring professional football clubs from England and Wales, and is the oldest such competition in world football. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish sports club most widely known for its professional football team based in Madrid. ... The name Crvena zvezda can also be applied to KK Crvena zvezda, VK Crvena zvezda, RK Crvena zvezda. ... A plaque at Old Trafford Football Ground remembering the Munich air disaster The Munich air disaster took place on February 6, 1958, when the British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at the Munich-Riem airport in Germany. ... Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to by the abbreviation AC Milan or simply Milan, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club are an English professional football club based in Wolverhampton, West Midlands. ... The London XI was an association football representative team, specially created to take part in a Europe-wide competition, the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, the precursor of todays UEFA Cup. ... Birmingham City Football Club are an English professional football club based in the city of Birmingham. ... The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was a European football competition played between 1955 and 1970. ...


Modernisation followed in the 1960s, with revolutions in the game such as the George Eastham case allowing players greater freedom of movement, and the abolition of the maximum wage in 1961. Tottenham Hotspur became the first club to win The Double in the 20th century in 1960-61, and the first English club to win a European trophy, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup in 1962-63. The most marked success of the era, however, was Alf Ramsey's England side, which won the 1966 FIFA World Cup on home soil after controversially beating West Germany 4-2 after extra time, the first and only time the national side has won the trophy. George Edward Eastham OBE (born September 23, 1936) is an English former footballer. ... A maximum wage is a state enforced limit on how much income an individual can earn. ... Current season Tottenham Hotspur Football Club is an English professional football club which currently plays in the Premier League. ... The Double is a term in football, which refers to winning a countrys top division and its main cup competition in the same season. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The UEFA Cup Winners Cup (also known as the European Cup Winners Cup) was a football club competition contested annually by the most recent winners of all European domestic cup competitions. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Sir Alfred Ernest Alf Ramsey (born 22 January 1920 in Dagenham, England; died 28 April 1999). ... Qualifying countries The 1966 FIFA World Cup, the eighth staging of the World Cup, was held in England from July 11 to July 30. ... Extra time is an additional period played at the end of some games of football (soccer) if the score is tied after the two standard periods (halves) of play. ...


Two years later Manchester United became the first English club to win the European Cup, while Leeds United and Arsenal both enjoyed success in the late sixties and early seventies. However, it was Liverpool who came to dominate the game from the early seventies onwards, for nearly two decades; they won 11 titles and four European Cups between 1972 and 1990. Other successful sides in the 1970s and 1980s included their rivals Nottingham Forest, who won a title and two European Cups in the late seventies, and Everton, with two titles in the mid eighties, and Aston Villa with a European Cup in 1982. However while club sides thrived in European competition, the national team struggled, failing to qualify for both the 1974 and 1978 World Cups, Leeds United Association Football Club are an English professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... Liverpool Football Club are an English professional football club based in Liverpool, Merseyside, who play in the Premier League; they are historically the most successful club in the history of English football, having won more trophies than any other English club. ... Nottingham Forest Football Club is an English professional football club based at The City Ground in Nottingham, England. ... Qualifying countries The 1974 FIFA World Cup, the tenth staging of the World Cup, was held in West Germany from June 13 to July 7. ... The 1978 FIFA World Cup, the 11th staging of the World Cup, was held in Argentina between June 1 and June 25. ...


By this time serious problems had surfaced. The rise of hooliganism marred the game throughout the seventies and eighties, with attendances dipping. The nadir came in 1985, when Liverpool fans' hooliganism, combined with poor policing and infrastructure, led to the deaths of 39 Juventus fans before the European Cup final, in the Heysel Stadium disaster; English clubs were banned from Europe for five years as a result. England's own ancient and poorly-built stadiums were responsible, along with other factors, for two disasters, one at Bradford in 1985 and the other at Hillsborough in 1989, killing 56 and 96 people respectively. Hooligan redirects here. ... Juventus redirects here. ... The Heysel Stadium disaster occurred due to football hooliganism in which a retaining wall of the Heysel Stadium in Brussels collapsed on May 29, 1985 during a football match between Liverpool F.C. from England and Juventus F.C. from Italy. ... ... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ...


The post-Hillsborough Taylor Report forced the conversion of stadiums to all-seater; at the same time, the money from television coverage was increasing rapidly. These, combined with England's relative success at the 1990 World Cup, reaching the semi-finals only to lose on penalties to West Germany, and a concerted effort to drive out hooliganism reinvigorated the national game. In the spring of 1992, the top 22 clubs resigned en masse from The Football League, forming a new top-level competition overseen by The FA and named The FA Premier League (from 2007, simply the Premier League). The Premier League came to be dominated by Manchester United in its first decade, who won eight titles and four FA Cups (including two Doubles) and a Champions League title between 1993 and 2003. The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ... The 1990 FIFA World Cup, the 14th staging of the World Cup, was held in Italy from June 8 to July 8. ...


Although this boom brought wealth to the game, clubs' financial success also became more polarised, particularly after the collapse of ITV Digital in 2002, which led to lower-division clubs being put into administration and one or two facing near-bankruptcy. This polarisation has occurred even within the Premier League, with it becoming dominated by Manchester United, Arsenal (winning two doubles in 1998 & 2002, and a league title unbeaten in 2004), and Chelsea (who were bought by Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich in 2003 and won back-to-back titles in 2005 and 2006). This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Roman Arkadyevich Abramovich (IPA: ) (Russian: ) (born 24 October 1966 in Saratov, Russian SFSR, USSR) is a Russian billionaire and the main owner of private investment company Millhouse Capital, referred to as one of the Russian oligarchs. ...


Despite the success of the domestic game, and a resurgence in fortunes for English clubs in Europe (Liverpool won the Champions League again in 2005), the national team's fortunes have been decidedly mixed, with them missing the '94 World Cup enitrely. They had their best post-1990 performance coming in Euro 96, where they were knocked out in the semi-finals on penalties by Germany; penalty shoot-out defeats went on to haunt England at the 1998 World Cup, Euro 2004 and the 2006 World Cup as well. Most recently England failed to reach the finals of the European Football Championships to be held in 2008 following a laclustre display throughout the qualifying campaign, with manager Steve McClaren being sacked from his position of head coach as a result. Qualifying countries The 1994 FIFA World Cup, the 15th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in the United States from June 17 to July 17, 1994. ... The 1996 UEFA European Football Championship (Euro 96) was hosted by England. ... 1998 World Cup redirects here. ... The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between June 12 and July 4, 2004. ... 2006 World Cup redirects here. ...


Stadia of English football

For more details on this topic, see List of English football stadia by capacity.

This is a partial list of English football stadia, ranked in descending order of capacity. ...

Seasons in English football

The following articles detail the major results and events in each season since 1871-72, when the first organised competition, the FA Cup, was created. Seasons in italics are wartime seasons, when official national competition was suspended, although regional football continued.

1870s:   1871-72 1872-73 1873-74 1874-75 1875-76 1876-77 1877-78 1878-79 1879-80
1880s: 1880-81 1881-82 1882-83 1883-84 1884-85 1885-86 1886-87 1887-88 1888-89 1889-90
1890s: 1890-91 1891-92 1892-93 1893-94 1894-95 1895-96 1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 1899-00
1900s: 1900-01 1901-02 1902-03 1903-04 1904-05 1905-06 1906-07 1907-08 1908-09 1909-10
1910s: 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15 1915-16 1916-17 1917-18 1918-19 1919-20
1920s: 1920-21 1921-22 1922-23 1923-24 1924-25 1925-26 1926-27 1927-28 1928-29 1929-30
1930s: 1930-31 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 1934-35 1935-36 1936-37 1937-38 1938-39 1939-40
1940s: 1940-41 1941-42 1942-43 1943-44 1944-45 1945-46 1946-47 1947-48 1948-49 1949-50
1950s: 1950-51 1951-52 1952-53 1953-54 1954-55 1955-56 1956-57 1957-58 1958-59 1959-60
1960s: 1960-61 1961-62 1962-63 1963-64 1964-65 1965-66 1966-67 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70
1970s: 1970-71 1971-72 1972-73 1973-74 1974-75 1975-76 1976-77 1977-78 1978-79 1979-80
1980s: 1980-81 1981-82 1982-83 1983-84 1984-85 1985-86 1986-87 1987-88 1988-89 1989-90
1990s: 1990-91 1991-92 1992-93 1993-94 1994-95 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00
2000s: 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08

The 1871-1872 season was the first season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1872-1873 season was the second season of competitive football in England. ... The 1873-1874 season was the third season of competitive football in England. ... The 1874-1875 season was the fourth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1875-1876 season was the fifth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1876-1877 season was the sixth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1876-1877 season was the seventh season of competitive football in England. ... The 1877-1878 season was the eighth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1879-1880 season was the ninth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1880-1881 season was the tenth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1881-1882 season was the eleventh season of competitive football in England. ... The 1882-1883 season was the twelfth season of competitive football in England. ... The 1883-1884 season was the thirteen competitive season of football in England. ... The 1884-1885 season was the fourteenth season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1885-1886 season was the fifteenth season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1886-1887 season was the sixteenth season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1887-1888 season was the seventeenth season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1888-1889 season was the 18th season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1899-00 season was the 29th season of competitive football in England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1903-04 season was the 33rd season of competitive football in England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1912-13 season was the 42nd season of competitive football in England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1915-16 season was the first season of special wartime football in England during World War I. Between 1915 and 1919 competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1916-17 season was the second season of special wartime football in England during World War I. Between 1915 and 1919 competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1917-18 season was the third season of special wartime football in England during World War I. Between 1915 and 1919 competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1918-19 season was the fourth and final season of special wartime football in England during World War I. Between 1915 and 1919 competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1919-1920 season was the 45th season of competitive football (soccer) in England, and the first following the end of World War I. Honours Category: ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1939-1940 season was the 65th season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... The 1940-41 season was the second season of special wartime football in England during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1941-42 season was the third season of special wartime football in England during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in England. ... ŐÃę ... The 1943-44 season was the fifth season of special wartime football in England during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1944-45 season was the fifth season of special wartime football in England during World War II. Between 1939 and 1946 normal competitive football was suspended in England. ... The 1945-1946 season was the 66th season of competitive football in England. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1954-1955 season was the 75th season of competitive football in England, from August 1954 to May 1955: // Overview Chelsea win the League Championship for the first time. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1963-1964 season was the 84th season of competitive football in England, from August 1963 to May 1964: // Overview Liverpool won the League Championship. ... // Overview After a three-way tussle for the League title between Manchester United, Leeds United and Chelsea, Manchester United came out on top and were crowned champions. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1967-68 season the 88th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1968-69 season the 89th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1969-70 season the 90th season of competitive football in England. ... // First Division Arsenal won the league championship at the end of a season which would soon be followed by their FA Cup final tie with Liverpool. ... // First Division Brian Clough, 37, won the first major trophy of his managerial career by guiding Derby County to their first ever league championship. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The 1973-74 season the 94th season of competitive football in England. ... // First Division David Mackay guided Derby County to their second league title in four years having overcome strong competition from Liverpool, Ipswich Town, Everton, Stoke City, Sheffield United and Middlesbrough in a title race which went right to the wire. ... The 1975-76 season was the 96th season of competitive football in England. ... // First Division Liverpool retained their league championship trophy and won their first European Cup to confirm Bob Paisley as a successful replacement for Bill Shankly in his third season at the helm. ... The 1977-1978 season was the 98th season of competitive football (soccer) in England, from August 1977 to July 1978: // Overview Wimbledon play their first season in the Football League, replacing Workington. ... // First Division Bob Paisley won his third league title in Liverpool and his conquering side fought off competition from the likes of Nottingham Forest and West Bromwich Albion to achieve their triumph. ... The 1979-80 season was the 100th season of competitive football (soccer) in England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... The 1981-82 season was the 102nd season of competitive football in England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... // First Division Liverpool had a great first season under the management of Joe Fagan as they wrapped up their third successive league title and the 15th in their history. ... // First Division Howard Kendalls world class Everton side beat neighbours Liverpool to the league championship, while Tottenham Hotspur and Manchester United followed closely behind. ... The 1985-86 season was the 106th season of competitive football in England. ... // First Division The 1986-87 First Division championship went to Everton in their final season under the management of Howard Kendall before his departure to Atletico Bilbao. ... // First Division Liverpool won the league title with a comfortable nine-point margin and just two defeats all season. ... The 1988-89 season was the 109th season of competitive football in England. ... // First Division Liverpool overhauled a greatly improved Aston Villa side to win their 18th league championship trophy and their fifth major trophy in as many seasons under Kenny Dalglishs management. ... The 1990-91 season was the 111th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1991-92 season was the 112th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1992-1993 season was the 113th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1993-1994 season was the 114th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1994-1995 season was the 115th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1995-1996 season was the 116th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1996-1997 season was the 117th season of competitive football in England. ... // Premier League Arsenal overhauled Manchester Uniteds lead during the final weeks of the season to win the Premiership title. ... The 1998-1999 season was the 119th season of competitive football in England. ... The 1999-2000 season was the 120th season of competitive football in England. ... The 2000-2001 season was the 121st season of competitive football in England. ... The 2001-2002 season was the 122nd season of competitive football in England. ... The 2002-2003 season was the 123rd season of competitive football (soccer) in England, from August 2002 to July 2003: // England national team Key: ECQ = 2004 European Championship qualifiers, F = Friendly; scores are written England first European club competitions UEFA Champions League Manchester United - Quarter finals Arsenal - Second group phase... The 2003-2004 season was the 124th season of competitive football in England. ... The 2004-2005 season was the 125th season of competitive football in England. ... The 2005–06 season was the 126th season of competitive football in England. ... The new Wembley Stadium was completed in time for the 2006-07 seasons FA Cup Final. ... The 2007–08 season is the 128th season of competitive football in England. ...

References

  1. ^ Mulcaster, Richard (1581)‘Positions Wherein Those Primitive Circumstances Be Examined, Which Are Necessarie for the Training up of Children’
  2. ^ Wall, Sir Frederick (2005). 50 Years of Football, 1884-1934. Soccer Books Limited. ISBN 1-8622-3116-8. 
  3. ^ History of Football
  4. ^ Corporate
  5. ^ FIFA Big Count 2006, p12
  6. ^ [Cox, Richard (2002) The encyclopaedia of British Football, Routledge, United Kingdom]
  7. ^ History of Football
  • A history of English football

See also

English football Portal 
The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ...

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