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Encyclopedia > Follies
Follies
Original Broadway poster
Music Stephen Sondheim
Lyrics Stephen Sondheim
Book James Goldman
Productions 1971 Broadway
1985 Lincoln Center
1987 West End
2001 Broadway revival
2002 West End revival
2007 New York City Center
Awards New York Drama Critics' Award for Best Musical
Tony Award for Best Score
Drama Desk Award for Best Score
Drama Desk Award for Best Lyrics

Follies is a musical with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a book by James Goldman. The show is nostalgic in tone and has a generally melancholy atmosphere. Several of its songs have become standards, including "Broadway Baby," "I'm Still Here," "Too Many Mornings," "Could I Leave You," and "Losing My Mind." The play was nominated for eleven Tonys and won seven. For other uses, see Folly (disambiguation). ... Folly may mean: Folly, in architecture, an extravagant building Stupidity Folly (band), an American skacore band Folly, fictional character in The Praise of Folly The antonym of wisdom Category: ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... James Goldman (June 30, 1929 - October 28, 1998) was an American playwright, and screenwriter, and brother of William Goldman. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... This article is about the year. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... New York City Center Logo New York City Center is a 2,750-seat performing arts venue located on West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in Manhattan, New York City. ... The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical in that year. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ... James Goldman (June 30, 1929 - October 28, 1998) was an American playwright, and screenwriter, and brother of William Goldman. ...


The Broadway production opened on April 4, 1971, directed by Hal Prince and Michael Bennett, and with choreography by Bennett. The production, which ultimately lost money, ran for 522 performances. Nevertheless, the piece has enjoyed a number of major revivals. In December 2007, Sondheim told The New York Times that a film adaptation of Follies was in development, with the director Sam Mendes and the writer Aaron Sorkin. [1] For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Bennett on the cover of his 1990 biography by Kevin Kelly Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 - July 2, 1987) was a Tony Award-winning American musical theater director, writer, choreographer, and dancer. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Sam Mendes Samuel Alexander Mendes, CBE (born August 1, 1965) is an English stage and film director born in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... Aaron Benjamin Sorkin (born June 9, 1961) is an American screenwriter, producer and playwright. ...

Contents

Background and story

Originally entitled The Girls Upstairs, Follies is set in a crumbling Broadway theatre, scheduled for demolition, during a reunion for all the past members of the "Weismann's Follies," a musical revue (based on the Ziegfeld Follies) which played in that theatre between the World Wars. The musical focuses on two couples, Buddy and Sally Durant Plummer and Ben and Phyllis Rogers Stone, who are attending the reunion. Sally and Phyllis were both showgirls in the Follies as were many of the other guests. Both marriages are having problems because Buddy, a traveling salesman, is having an affair with a girl on the road, Sally is still in love with Ben as she was years ago, and Ben is so self-absorbed that Phyllis feels emotionally abandoned. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... This article is about the Ziegfeld Follies Broadway shows . ...


The two couples interact with each other and other partygoers, and throughout the first half, musical numbers from the old Follies are performed by the characters, sometimes accompanied by the ghosts of their former selves. Most of the songs are pastiches of songs by popular songwriters of the past. Losing My Mind is in the style of a George Gershwin ballad, The God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me Blues is in the style of Cole Porter and Loveland is akin to a 1920s Ziegfield Follies serenade. The last section of the show features a string of vaudeville-style numbers reflecting the leading characters' emotional troubles before returning to the theatre for the end of the reunion party. The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Gershwin redirects here. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... The Ziegfeld Follies were a series of elaborate theatrical productions on Broadway in New York City from 1907 through 1931. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ...


Productions

1971 Broadway premiere

Follies opened on Broadway on April 4, 1971 at the Winter Garden Theatre, directed by Hal Prince and Michael Bennett, with choreography by Bennett. It starred Alexis Smith (Phyllis), John McMartin (Benjamin), Dorothy Collins (Sally), Gene Nelson (Buddy), and Yvonne De Carlo, along with several veterans of the Broadway and vaudeville stage. Even though the production ran for well over a year (522 performances), it was not considered a success, and lost money. This was due partly to the rather bleak nature of the show itself, particularly Goldman's book. Frank Rich, for many years The New York Times's chief drama critic, wrote on the occasion of the 1985 concert performance that audiences at the original production were baffled and restless. [1] Goldman subsequently revised his work right up to his death, which occurred shortly before the 1998 Paper Mill production. Sondheim too has added and removed songs that he judged to be problematic in various productions. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Winter Garden Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... Hal Prince (born January 30, 1928), full name Harold Smith Prince, is a American theatrical producer and director associated with many of the best-known Broadway musical productions of the past half-century. ... Bennett on the cover of his 1990 biography by Kevin Kelly Michael Bennett (April 8, 1943 - July 2, 1987) was a Tony Award-winning American musical theater director, writer, choreographer, and dancer. ... Alexis Smith Alexis Smith (June 8, 1921 – June 9, 1993) was an actress. ... John McMartin is an American actor, born in Warsaw, Indiana and raised in Minnesota. ... The cast of Your Hit Parade (left to right) Russell Arms, Gisele Mackenzie, Dorothy Collins, and Snooky Lanson Dorothy Collins (November 18, 1926 - July 21, 1994) was a Canadian-born singer and actress. ... Gene Nelson (March 24, 1920 - September 16, 1996), born Leander Eugene Berg, was a dancer, film actor and director. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times who focuses on American politics and popular culture. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article is about the year. ...


The plum supporting role of Carlotta Campion, the seen-it-all ex-Follies girl who sings the showstopping "I'm Still Here," was created by Yvonne De Carlo in 1971, and has subsequently been given often to a celebrated veteran performer. ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ...


For commercial reasons, the cast album was cut from two LPs to one early in production. Most songs were therefore heavily abridged and several were left entirely unrecorded. ("One More Kiss" was omitted from the final release for time reasons, but was restored for CD release.)


1985 concert

The 1985 concert at Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, featured Carol Burnett in the role of Carlotta. A stellar cast was assembled for the other roles: Barbara Cook, George Hearn, Mandy Patinkin, Lee Remick, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Liliane Montevecchi, Elaine Stritch, Phyllis Newman and Licia Albanese. This article is about the year. ... , Avery Fisher Hall in Lincoln Center. ... The Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ... Barbara Cook (born October 25, 1927) is a Tony Award-winning American singer and actress who first came to prominence in the 1950s after creating roles in the Broadway musicals Candide and The Music Man, among others. ... With Angela Lansbury in Sweeney Todd George Hearn (born June 18, 1934, in St. ... Mandel Bruce Patinkin (born November 30, 1952) is a Tony Award winning and Emmy Award winning American actor of stage and screen, as well as a renowned tenor. ... Lee Remick Lee Remick (December 14, 1935 - July 2, 1991), was an American actress admired for her versality and her great beauty. ... Comden and Green was the writing duo of Betty Comden and Adolph Green. ... Adolph Green (December 2, 1914 – October 23, 2002) was an American lyricist and playwright who, with long-time collaborator Betty Comden, penned the screenplays and songs for some of the most beloved movie musicals, particularly as part of Arthur Freeds production unit at MGM, during the genres heyday. ... Liliane Montevecchi (born October 13, 1932) is a French-Italian actress, dancer, and singer. ... Elaine Stritch (born on February 2, 1925) is an Irish-American actress and singer. ... Phyllis Newman (born March 19, 1933 in Jersey City, New Jersey) is an actress and singer who was a frequent panelist on game shows such as Whats My Line? and Match Game. ... Licia Albanese, born July 22, 1913, in Bari, Italy, is a distinguished Italian soprano and chairman of The Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation, founded in 1974 and dedicated to assisting young artists and singers. ...


Among the reasons the concert was staged was to provide an opportunity to record the entire score. The resulting album was much more complete than the original cast album. However, director Herbert Ross took many liberties in adapting the book and score for the concert format--dance music was changed, songs were given false endings, new dialogue was spoken, reprises were added, and Patinkin was allowed to sing "The God-Why-Don't-You-Love-Me Blues" as a solo instead of a trio with two chorus girls. There is a videotape and DVD of the concert released in 1986 called Follies in Concert. [2] Herbert David Ross (May 13, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York - October 9, 2001 in New York City), also known as Herb Ross, was a prolific film director, producer, choreographer and actor from the 1950s to the 1990s. ...


1987 London production

The London production purple poster
The London production purple poster

Dolores Gray played Carlotta in the 1987 London production at the Shaftesbury Theatre. The production by Cameron Mackintosh was directed by Mike Ockrent and featured Diana Rigg (Phyllis), Daniel Massey (Ben), Julia McKenzie (Sally), David Healy (Buddy), Lynda Baron, Leonard Sachs, Maria Charles, Pearl Carr & Teddy Johnson. During the run, Eartha Kitt replaced Gray as Carlotta. Goldman wrote a completely new book for the production, and Sondheim wrote four new songs: "Country House" (replacing "The Road You Didn't Take"), "Loveland" (replacing the song of the same title), "Ah, But Underneath" (replacing "The Story of Lucy and Jessie", for the non-dancer Diana Rigg), and "Make the Most of Your Music" (replacing "Live, Laugh, Love"). The production was, in the opinion of critics who saw it in New York (such as Frank Rich), substantially more "upbeat" and lacking in the atmosphere it had originally possessed. This production was also recorded on two CDs. Follies was voted ninth in a BBC Radio 2 listener poll of the UK's "Nation's Number One Essential Musicals." [3] Dolores Gray (born 7th June 1924, Chicago) was a well-known Broadway star in the 1940s-1950s. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Shaftesbury Theatre is located on Shaftesbury Ave in London, England. ... Dame Enid Diana Elizabeth Rigg DBE (born 20 July 1938) is an English actress. ... Daniel Raymond Massey (October 10, 1933 - March 25, 1998) was a British-Canadian actor; he was educated at Eton College and Kings College, Cambridge. ... Julia McKenzie (born 17 February 1941, Enfield, Middlesex, England) is a British actor and theatre director. ... Lynda Baron with Ronnie Barker and David Jason in Open All Hours Lynda Baron (born 24 March 1942 in Urmston, Manchester, Lancashire) is an English actress. ... Leonard Sachs (born 26 September 1909 in Roodeport, Transvaal, died 15 June 1990) was a British actor. ... Maria Charles (born 22 September 1929 in London, England) is an actress who carved a niche for herself on television playing clingy Jewish mothers. ... Pearl Carr and Teddy Johnson were a popular British husband-and-wife team of entertainers during the 1950s and early 1960s. ... Eartha Kitt (born Eartha Mae Keith on January 17, 1927),[1] is an American actress, singer, and cabaret star. ... Dame Enid Diana Elizabeth Rigg DBE (born 20 July 1938) is an English actress. ... Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times who focuses on American politics and popular culture. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is by far the most popular station in the UK, reaching some 27% of the available audience in 2006[1]. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in... An opinion poll is a survey of opinion from a particular sample. ...


1995 and 1998 regional productions

This production ran at the Theatre Under the Stars, Houston, Texas and later at the Fifth Avenue Theatre, Seattle with Virginia Mayo, Denise Darcel, Edie Adams, Constance Towers and Karen Morrow in the cast. The 1998 Paper Mill Playhouse revival in Millburn, New Jersey featured the legendary MGM star Ann Miller in the role of Carlotta. Also in the cast were Donna McKechnie, Kaye Ballard, Eddie Bracken, and Laurence Guittard; Newman and Montevecchi reprised the roles they played in the Lincoln Center production. "Ah, But Underneath" was substituted for "The Story of Lucy and Jessie" in order to accommodate non-dancer Dee Hoty in the role of Phyllis. This production received a full-length recording on two CDs, including not only the entire score as originally written, but a lengthy appendix of songs cut from the original production in tryouts. Theatre Under the Stars or TUTS may refer to: Theatre Under the Stars (Vancouver) - musical theatre company in Vancouver, British Columbia Theatre Under The Stars (Houston) - musical theatre company in Houston, Texas Theatre Under the Stars (New Jersey) - musical theatre company in New Jersey Theatre in the Park - theatre company... Houston redirects here. ... The 5th Avenue Theatre, located in Seattle, Washington, USA, has hosted a variety of theatre productions and motion pictures since it opened in 1926. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... Virginia Mayo (November 30, 1920 – January 17, 2005) was an American film actress. ... Image:Darcel156. ... Edie Adams (born Elizabeth Edith Enke) is an American singer and light comedienne who was born on April 16, 1927, in Kingston, Pennsylvania. ... Constance playing Julianna Deschanel in Sunset Beach Constance Towers (b. ... Karen Morrow (born December 15, 1936 in Chicago) has had a long and varied career as a singer-actress specializing in musical theater. ... Paper Mill Playhouse is a regional theatre located in Millburn, New Jersey, less than 25 miles away from Manhattan. ... Millburn is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. ... MGM logo Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer or MGM, is a large media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of cinema and television programs. ... Ann Miller was born on April 12, 1923 and died on January 22, 2004. ... // Donna McKechnie (born November 16, 1940) is a Tony Award-winning American musical theater dancer, singer. ... Kaye Ballard, born Catherine Gloria Balotta on November 20, 1926, in Cleveland, Ohio to an Italian immigrant father, is an actress who has appeared on Broadway and on television. ... Eddie Bracken (born February 7, 1915; died November 14, 2002) was an American comic actor. ... Laurence Guittard is an actor and singer, mostly appearing on the Broadway stage. ...


1996 Dublin production

The 1996 Dublin Production starred Lorna Luft, Millicent Martin, Mary Millar and Enda Markey. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Millicent Mary Lillian Martin (born 8 June 1934) is an English actress, singer and comedienne. ... Mary Millar (July 26, 1936–November 10, 1998) was a British actress born in Doncaster, Yorkshire. ... Enda Markey (b. ...


2001 Broadway revival

Another former MGM star, Betty Garrett, played the role of Hattie in the 2001 Broadway revival at the Belasco Theatre, which ran for 117 performances. Directed by Matthew Warchus, with choreography by Kathleen Marshall, also starring were Blythe Danner (Phyllis), Judith Ivey (Sally), Treat Williams (Buddy), Marge Champion, Gregory Harrison (Benjamin), Polly Bergen (Carlotta), Joan Roberts (later replaced by Marni Nixon), Larry Raiken, and an assortment of famous names from the past. It was significantly stripped down (previous productions, especially the original, were most notable for their extravagant sets and costumes) and was not a success critically or financially. Betty Garrett (born May 23, 1919 in St. ... The Belasco Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... Matthew Warchus (Director), studied music and drama at Bristol University. ... Kathleen Marshall is a choreographer, director and creative consultant. ... Blythe Katherine Danner (born February 3, 1943) is a prolific two time Emmy-winning American actress who has appeared in numerous stage, screen, and film roles. ... Judith Ivey (born September 4, 1951 in El Paso, Texas) is an American actress. ... Treat Williams (born December 1, 1951) is an American film, stage and television actor. ... Marge Champion (September 2, 1919, Los Angeles, California) became a legend in Hollywood with her ex-husband, Gower Champion (June 22, 1921. ... As John Phillips in For Ladies Only Gregory Harrison Television actor, Gregory Harrison was born on May 31, 1950 in Avalon, Catalina Island, California. ... Polly Bergen (born Nellie Paulina Burgin on July 14, 1930, in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actress, singer, and entrepreneur. ... Joan Roberts (b. ... Marni Nixon (born February 22, 1930) is a singer whose renown for dubbing the singing voices of featured actresses in movies earned her the sobriquet The Ghostess with the Mostess. She was born Margaret McEathron in Altadena, California and began singing at a young age in choruses. ...


2002 London revival

London's Royal Festival Hall mounted a full production in August 2002, with Paul Kerryson from the Leicester Haymarket directing. The cast starred David Durham as Ben, Kathryn Evans as Sally, Louise Gold as Phyllis, and, Henry Goodman as Buddy. The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. ... Louise Gold is a British singer-actress and Spitting Image puppeteer, formerly a The Muppet Show puppeteer. ... Henry Goodman is a theatre actor. ...


2007 Encores! concert

New York City Center's Encores! "Great American Musicals in Concert" series featured Follies as its 40th production for 6 performances in February 2007 in a sold out semi-staged concert. The cast starred Donna Murphy (Phyllis), Victoria Clark (Sally), Victor Garber (Ben), and Michael McGrath (Buddy). Christine Baranski played Carlotta, and Lucine Amara sang Heidi. The cast also included JoAnne Worley, and Philip Bosco. The director and choreographer was Casey Nicolaw, the music director Eric Stern. One objective of the Encores! series is to use the full original instrumentation intended by the composer. Stephen Sondheim spoke from the stage at the post-matinee audience "talkback" session. New York City Center Logo New York City Center is a 2,750-seat performing arts venue located on West 55th Street between 6th and 7th Avenues in Manhattan, New York City. ... New York City Centers Encores!® Great American Musicals in Concert has been performing since 1994. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Soprano Victoria Clark won the Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical in 2005 for her performance in Adam Guettels The Light in the Piazza. ... Victor Joseph Garber (born on March 16, 1949 in London, Ontario, Canada) is a six-time Emmy Award-nominated Canadian film, stage and television actor and singer. ... Christine Baranski Christine Baranski (born 2 May 1952) is an American actress. ... Lucine Amara is a diva. ... Jo Anne Worley Jo Anne Worley (born on September 6, 1937) is an American actress. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... New York City Centers Encores!® Great American Musicals in Concert has been performing since 1994. ...


Song list

The original Broadway production of Follies was performed in one act; however, many later productions added intermissions.

  • Beautiful Girls - Roscoe and Company
  • Don't Look at Me - Sally and Ben
  • Waiting for the Girls Upstairs - Ben, Sally, Phyllis and Buddy, with Young Ben, Young Sally, Young Phyllis and Young Buddy
  • Rain on the Roof - Emily and Theodore
  • Ah, Paris! - Solange
  • Broadway Baby - Hattie
  • The Road You Didn't Take - Ben
  • Bolero d'Amour - Danced by Vincent and Vanessa; omitted from some productions
  • In Buddy's Eyes - Sally
  • Who's That Woman? - Stella and Company
  • I'm Still Here - Carlotta
  • Too Many Mornings - Ben and Sally
  • The Right Girl - Buddy
  • One More Kiss - Heidi and Young Heidi
  • Could I Leave You? - Phyllis
  • Loveland - Company
  • You're Gonna Love Tomorrow / Love Will See Us Through - Young Ben, Young Sally, Young Phyllis and Young Buddy
  • Buddy's Blues - Buddy
  • Losing My Mind - Sally
  • The Story of Lucy and Jessie - Phyllis; some productions substitute Ah, But Underneath...
  • Live, Laugh, Love - Ben
  • Finale - Company; varies by production, often a reprise of Beautiful Girls

Critical response

In the foreword to "Everything Was Possible", Frank Rich wrote: "From the start, critics have been divided about Follies, passionately pro or con but rarely on the fence. ...Is it really a great musical, or merely the greatest of all cult musicals..." (Chapin, p. xi) Ted Chapin wrote, "Taken as a whole, the collection of reviews Follies received was as rangy as possible." (Chapin, p. 300) Frank Rich (born June 2, 1949 in Washington, D.C.) is a columnist for The New York Times who focuses on American politics and popular culture. ...


In his New York Times review of the original Broadway production, Clive Barnes wrote: "...it is stylish, innovative, it has some of the best lyrics I have ever encountered, and above all it is a serious attempt to deal with the musical form." Barnes also called the story shallow and Sondheim's words a joy "...even when his music sends shivers of indifference up your spine." [2] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Clive Barnes (born May 13, 1927) is an English writer, journalist, and critic. ...


Walter Kerr wrote in the New York Times, "Follies is intermissionless and exhausting, an extravaganza that becomes so tedious... because its extravaganzas have nothing to do with its pebble of a plot."[3] On the other hand, Martin Gottfried wrote: "'Follies' is truly awesome and, if it is not consistently good, it is always great."[4] Walter Kerr (July 8, 1913 – October 9, 1996) was an American writer and Broadway theater critic. ... Martin Gottfried on the dust jacket of Balancing Act, his 1999 biography of Angela Lansbury Martin Gottfried is an American critic, columnist, and author. ...


Frank Rich, in reviewing the 1985 concert, wrote: "Friday's performance made the case that this Broadway musical... can take its place among our musical theater's very finest achievements."[5]


Ben Brantley, reviewing the 1998 revival, concluded that it was a "...fine, heartfelt production, which confirms Follies as a landmark musical and a work of art..."[6] Ben Brantley (born October 26, 1954) is the chief theatre critic of the New York Times. ...


Awards and nominations

Original 1971 Broadway

  • New York Drama Critics' Award for Best Musical

Tony Awards What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ...

  • Best Musical (nominee)
  • Best Book of a Musical (nominee)
  • Best Featured Actor in a Musical (Gene Nelson) (nominee)
  • Best Music and Lyrics (Stephen Sondheim) (winner)
  • Best Director (Harold Prince and Michael Bennett) (winners)
  • Best Actress in a Musical
Alexis Smith (winner)
Dorothy Collins (nominee)
  • Best Choreographer (Michael Bennett) (winner)
  • Best Scenic Design (Boris Aronson) (winner)
  • Best Costumes (Florence Klotz) (winner)
  • Best Lighting (Tharon Musser)(winner)

Drama Desk Award Created in 1955, the Drama Desk Award was created to recognize Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway shows in addition to Broadway shows. ...

  • Outstanding Choreography (winner)
  • Outstanding Lyrics (winner)
  • Outstanding Music (winner)
  • Outstanding Costume Design (winner)
  • Outstanding Set Design (winner)
  • Outstanding Performance - Starring- Alexis Smith (winner)
  • Outstanding Director Harold Prince, Michael Bennett - (winner)

2001 Broadway revival


Tony Awards

  • Best Revival of a Musical (nominee)
  • Best Actress in a Musical (Blythe Danner) (nominee)
  • Featured Actress in a Musical (Polly Bergen)(nominee)
  • Best Costume Design (nominee)
  • Best Orchestrations (nominee)

Drama Desk Award

  • Outstanding Revival of a Musical (nominee)
  • Outstanding Featured Actress in a Musical (Polly Bergen) (nominee)
  • Outstanding Orchestrations (nominee)

References

  1. ^ Green, Jesse. "Another Stab?", The New York Times, 2007-12-16. Retrieved on 2007-12-16.
  2. ^ New York Times, Clive Barnes, "Follies", April 5, 1971
  3. ^ (New York Times, "Yes, Yes, Alexis! No, No, Follies!" Walter Kerr, 4/11/71, p. D1
  4. ^ "Flipping Over 'Follies' ", April 25, 1971, New York Times
  5. ^ New York Times, Frank Rich, 9/9/85, p. C16
  6. ^ "Beguiled By the Past", Ben Brantley, May 8, 1998, New York Times
  • Ted Chapin, (2005). Everything Was Possible: The Birth of the Musical Follies. New York: Applause Books. ISBN 15-5783-653-1. 
  • Stephen Sondheim, James Goldman (2001). Follies (Playwrights Canada Press). New York, N.Y: Theatre Communications Group. ISBN 15-5936-196-4. 

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Awards
Preceded by
Tony Award for Best Original Score
Company
by Stephen Sondheim
Tony Award for Best Original Score
1972
by Stephen Sondheim
Succeeded by
A Little Night Music
by Stephen Sondheim
Preceded by
Tony Award for Best Lyrics
Company
by Stephen Sondheim

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sondheim.com - Putting it together since 1994. (453 words)
This musical, with a book by James Goldman, takes place at a reunion of the Weisman (pseudo-Ziegfeld) Follies girls, gathering at their old theatre on the eve of its leveling to become a parking lot.
The entire show is interspersed with ex-showgirls reprising their old big numbers, and the atmosphere is heightened by the presence of the ghosts of everyone's former selves, who sometimes sing along, sometimes reenact important events, and sometimes even interact with the present.
The final piece (in the original script) is "Live Laugh, Love" where Ben attempts to present the suave, man-about-town character, but is unable to continue the charade and breaks down as the chorus continues, highlighting the dichotomy between forms.
Parc de la Villette (615 words)
The grid of red follies create reference points and are non-contextual in their form and color, in favor of an intertextuality that leads to a dissolving of a priori meanings.
Although the follies are physically deconstructed, their intended lack of meaning relates his use of the philosophy to its essence, not stylistic applications.
The assertion that the follies lack any historical precedent is important to the idea of "non-meaning" and valid in terms of classical styles and their parts (columns, arches and so forth).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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