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Only downtown San Francisco and Sutro tower are free from fog
Only downtown San Francisco and Sutro tower are free from fog

Fog is a cloud in contact with the ground. Fog differs from other clouds only in that fog touches the surface of the Earth. The same cloud that is not fog on lower ground may be fog where it contacts higher ground such as hilltops or mountain ridges. Fog is distinct from mist only in its density. Fog is defined as cloud which reduces visibility to less than 1 km, whereas mist is that which reduces visibility to less than 2 km. Look up fog in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Sutro Tower as viewed from the east Sutro Tower is a three-pronged antenna tower on Mount Sutro in the western part of San Francisco, California at 37°4519. ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... Dramatic morning mist Mist is a phenomenon of a liquid in small droplets floating through air. ... In Meteorology, ability is a measure of the nothingness at which an object or light can be seen. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ...


The foggiest place in the world is the Grand Banks off the island of Newfoundland, Canada. Fog is frequent there as the Grand Banks is the meeting place of the cold Labrador Current from the north and the much warmer Gulf Stream from the south. The foggiest land areas in the world are Point Reyes, California, and Argentia, Newfoundland and Labrador, both with over 200 foggy days a year. Map showing the Grand Banks Historic map of the Grand Banks. ... Newfoundland —   IPA: [nuw fÉ™n lænd] (French: , Irish: ) is a large island off the east coast of North America, and the most populous part of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... The Labrador Current is a cold current in the north Atlantic Ocean which flows from the Arctic Ocean south along the coast of Labrador and passes around Newfoundland, continuing south along the east coast of Nova Scotia. ... For the album by Ocean Colour Scene, see North Atlantic Drift (album) The Gulf Stream is orange and yellow in this representation of water temperatures of the Atlantic. ... Point Reyes Point Reyes is a prominent cape on the Pacific coast of northern California in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Argentia, Newfoundland Argentia on the Avalon Peninsula Argentia is a community on the island of Newfoundland in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ...

Contents

Characteristics

Part of the Nature series on
Weather
 
Seasons

Spring · Summer
Autumn · Winter The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... This article is about the temperate season. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ...

Dry season
Wet season The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A wet season or rainy season is a season in which the average rainfall in a region is significantly increased. ...

Storms

Thunderstorm · Tornado
Tropical cyclone (Hurricane)
Extratropical cyclone
Winter storm · Blizzard
Ice storm For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... A shelf cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... This article is about the weather phenomenon. ... Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... A fictitious synoptic chart of an extratropical cyclone affecting the UK & Ireland. ... A typical view of a winter storm. ... This article is about the winter storm condition. ... Ice storm could refer to: A type of winter storm characterized by freezing rain. ...

Precipitation

Fog · Drizzle · Rain
Freezing rain · Ice pellets
Hail · Snow · Graupel Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ... This article is about precipitation. ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... Sleet can refer to at least two different forms of precipitation. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... Graupel can be any of the following types of solid-ice precipitation: hail - large chunks of ice such as from a strong or severe thunderstorm sleet - small pellets of raindrops that have frozen in mid-air, in winter or a thunderstorm snow pellets - when freezing fog forms 2-5mm balls...

Topics

Meteorology
Weather forecasting
Climate · Air pollution This page has a list of meteorology topics. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... Modern weather predictions aid in timely evacuations and potentially save lives and property damage Human beings have attempted to predict the weather since time immemorial. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ...

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Fog forms when the difference (Δ) between temperature and dewpoint is (5 °F) 3 °C, or less. Look up delta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... The dew point or dewpoint of a given parcel of air is the temperature to which the parcel must be cooled, at constant barometric pressure, for the water vapor component to condense into water, called dew. ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ...


Fog begins to form when water vapor (a colorless gas) condenses into tiny liquid water droplets in the air. Conversely, water vapor is formed by the evaporation of liquid water or by the sublimation of ice. Since water vapor is colorless, it is actually the small liquid water droplets that are condensed from it that make water suspended in the atmosphere visible in the form of fog or any other type of cloud. Fog normally occurs at a relative humidity around 100%. This can be achieved by either adding moisture to the air or dropping the ambient air temperature. Fog can form at lower humidities, and fog can sometimes not form with relative humidity at 100%. A reading of 100% relative humidity means that the air can hold no additional moisture and the air will then become supersaturated if additional moisture is added. Fog formation does require all of the elements that normal cloud formation requires with the most important being condensation nuclei. When the air is saturated, additional moisture tends to condense rather than staying in the air as vapor. Condensation nuclei must be present in the form of dust, aeresols, pollutants, etc. for the water to condense upon. When there are exceptional amounts of condensation nuclei present, especially hydroscopic (water seeking such as salt, see below) then the water vapor may condense below 100% relative humidity. Water vapor or water vapour (see spelling differences), also aqueous vapor, is the gas phase of water. ... For other uses, see Condensation (disambiguation). ... Vaporization redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A hygrometer used to measure the humidity of air. ... In physics, the term supersaturation or oversaturation refers to a solution that contains more of the dissolved material than could be dissolved by the solvent under existing circumstances. ... Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh - NASA Cloud condensation nuclei or CCNs (also known as cloud seeds) are small particles (typically 0. ... Hygroscopy is the ability of a substance to attract water molecules from the surrounding environment through either absorption or adsorption. ...


Fog can form suddenly, and can dissipate just as rapidly, depending what side of the dewpoint the temperature is on. This phenomenon is known as flash fog. The dew point or dewpoint of a given parcel of air is the temperature to which the parcel must be cooled, at constant barometric pressure, for the water vapor component to condense into water, called dew. ...


Another type of formation also common is sea fog (also knows as salt fog or salty Fog). This is due to the peculiar effect of salt. Clouds of all types require minute hygroscopic particles upon which water vapor can condense. Over the ocean surface, the most common particles are salt from salt spray produced by breaking waves. Except in areas of storminess, the most common areas of breaking waves are located near coastlines, hence the greatest densities of airborne salt particles are there. Condensation on salt particles has been observed to occur at humidities as low as 70%, thus fog can occur even in relatively dry air in suitable locations such as the California coast. Typically, such lower humidity fog is preceded by a transparent mistiness along the coastline as condensation competes with evaporation, a phenomenon that is typically noticeable by beachgoers in the afternoon. This article is about common table salt. ... Hygroscopy is the ability of a substance to attract water molecules from the surrounding environment through either absorption or adsorption. ...



Fog occasionally produces precipitation in the form of drizzle. Drizzle occurs when the humidity of fog attains 100% and the minute cloud droplets begin to coalesce into larger droplets. This can occur when the fog layer is lifted and cooled sufficiently, or when it is forcibly compressed from above. Drizzle becomes freezing drizzle when the temperature at the surface drops below the freezing point. Drizzle is fairly steady, light precipitation. ...


The thickness of fog is largely determined by the altitude of the inversion boundary, which in coastal or oceanic locales is also the top of the marine layer, above which the airmass is warmer and drier. The inversion boundary varies its altitude primarily in response to the weight of the air above it which is measured in terms of atmospheric pressure. The marine layer and any fogbank it may contain will be "squashed" when the pressure is high, and conversely, may expand upwards when the pressure above it is lowering.


Fog as a visibility hazard

Light fog reducing visibility in suburban street. Cyclist is very hazy at about 200m (219 yards). Zero visibility occurs before the end of this street, which is at about 400m (437 yards).
Light fog reducing visibility in suburban street. Cyclist is very hazy at about 200m (219 yards). Zero visibility occurs before the end of this street, which is at about 400m (437 yards).

Fog reduces visibility. Although most sea vessels can penetrate fog using radar, road vehicles have to travel slowly and use low-beam headlights. Localised fog is especially dangerous, as drivers can be caught by surprise. In Meteorology, ability is a measure of the nothingness at which an object or light can be seen. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ...


At airports, some attempts have been made to develop methods (such as using heating or spraying salt particles) to aid fog dispersal. These methods enjoy some success at temperatures below freezing.


Accidents

Fog contributes to accidents, particularly with modes of transportation. Ships, trains, cars and planes cannot see each other and collide. Notable examples of accidents due to fog include the July 28, 1945 crash of a B-25 Mitchell into the Empire State Building, and the July 25, 1956 collision of the ocean liners the SS Andrea Doria and MS Stockholm. is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The North American B-25 Mitchell (NA-62) was an American twin-engined medium bomber manufactured by North American Aviation. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The SS Andrea Doria was an ocean liner for the Italian Line (Società di navigazione Italia) home ported in Genoa, Italy. ...


The worst accident in aviation history occurred in the fog when 2 Boeing 747s collided in 1977 in Tenerife. One 747 had clearance to taxi down a foggy runway and the other could not see any distance down the runway when the captain decided to take off without proper clearance. The Tenerife collision took place on March 27, 1977, at 17:06:56 local time (also GMT), when two Boeing 747 airliners collided at Los Rodeos (TCI) on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, killing 583 people. ...


Types

Fog can form in a number of ways, depending on how the cooling that caused the condensation occurred: Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Water vapor or water vapour (see spelling differences), also aqueous vapor, is the gas phase of water. ...

Early morning radiation fog on a cool morning in Texas. Temperature is 45°F or 7°C.
Minute particles of water constitute this after dark radiation fog in Oregon with the ambient temperature -2 °C.
Minute particles of water constitute this after dark radiation fog in Oregon with the ambient temperature -2 °C.
High speed photo of the above.
High speed photo of the above.
Minus 25 degree Celsius air temperature produces immense steam fog over Lake Ontario which is still 2 to 5 degrees Celsius above freezing.
Minus 25 degree Celsius air temperature produces immense steam fog over Lake Ontario which is still 2 to 5 degrees Celsius above freezing.

Radiation fog is formed by the cooling of land after sunset by thermal radiation in calm conditions with clear sky. The cool ground produces condensation in the nearby air by heat conduction. In perfect calm the fog layer can be less than a meter deep but turbulence can promote a thicker layer. Radiation fogs occur at night, and usually does not last long after sunrise. Radiation fog is common in autumn, and early winter. Examples of this phenomenon include the Tule fog. http://www.nwas.org/ej/pdf/2007-FTT1.pdf For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self made. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 1024 pixel, file size: 133 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Self made. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The degree Celsius (°C) is a unit of temperature named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who first proposed a similar system in 1742. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (525 × 700 pixel, file size: 287 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken from Samuel Smith Park in Toronto looking south over Lake Ontario. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (525 × 700 pixel, file size: 287 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken from Samuel Smith Park in Toronto looking south over Lake Ontario. ... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... Radiant heat redirects here. ... For other uses, see Sky (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Condensation (disambiguation). ... Heat conduction or thermal conduction is the spontaneous transfer of thermal energy through matter, from a region of higher temperature to a region of lower temperature, and acts to equalize temperature differences. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by chaotic, stochastic property changes. ... A typical sunrise, in New Zealand A sunrise through clouds over Oakland, California. ... This article is about the temperate season. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... Tule fog (IPA: ) is a thick ground fog that settles in the San Joaquin Valley and Sacramento Valley areas of Californias Great Central Valley. ...


Ground fog is fog that obscures less than 60% of the sky and does not extend to the base of any overhead clouds. However, the term is sometimes used to refer to radiation fog.


Advection fog occurs when moist air passes over a cool surface by advection (wind) and is cooled. It is common as a warm front passes over an area with significant snowpack. It's most common at sea when tropical air encounters cooler waters, or in areas of upwelling, such as along the California coast. The advection of fog along the California coastline is propelled onto land by one of several processes. A cold front can push the marine layer coastward, an occurrence most typical in the spring or late fall. During the summer months, a low pressure trough produced by intense heating inland creates a strong pressure gradient, drawing in the dense marine layer. Also during the summer, strong high pressure aloft over the desert southwest, usually in connection with the summer monsoon, produces a south to southeasterly flow which can drive the offshore marine layer up the coastline; a phenomenon known as a "southerly surge", typically following a coastal heat spell. However, if the monsoonal flow is sufficiently turbulent, it might instead break up the marine layer and any fog it may contain. Advection is the transport of a conserved scalar quantity that is transported in a vector field. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... Illustration of a warm front A warm front is defined as the leading edge of a mass of warm air. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the body of water. ... The tropics are the geographic region of the Earth centered on the equator and limited in latitude by the two tropics: the Tropic of Cancer in the north and the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern hemisphere. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Upwelling is an oceanographic phenomenon that involves wind-driven motion of dense, cooler, and usually nutrient-rich water towards the ocean surface, replacing the warmer, usually nutrient-depleted surface water. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ...


Steam fog, also called evaporation fog, is the most localized form and is created by cold air passing over much warmer water or moist land. It often causes freezing fog, or sometimes hoar frost. Hoar frost on a rose twig. ...


Precipitation fog (or frontal fog) forms as precipitation falls into drier air below the cloud, the liquid droplets evaporate into water vapor. The water vapor cools and at the dewpoint it condenses and fog forms. Evaporation is the process whereby atoms or molecules in a liquid state (or solid state if the substance sublimes) gain sufficient energy to enter the gaseous state. ... The dew point or dewpoint of a given parcel of air is the temperature to which the parcel must be cooled, at constant barometric pressure, for the water vapor component to condense into water, called dew. ...


Upslope fog forms when winds blow air up a slope (called orographic lift), adiabatical cooling it as it rises, and causing the moisture in it to condense. This often causes freezing fog on mountaintops, where the cloud ceiling would not otherwise be low enough. This article is about the mathematical term. ... This wave cloud pattern formed off of the ÃŽle Amsterdam in the far southern Indian Ocean, due to orographic lift of an airmass by the island, producing alternating bands of condensed and invisible humidity downwind of the island as the moist air moves in vertical waves and the moisture successively... In thermodynamics, an adiabatic process or an isocaloric process is a thermodynamic process in which no heat is transferred to or from the working fluid. ...


Valley fog forms in mountain valleys, often during winter. It is the result of a temperature inversion caused by heavier cold air settling into in a valley, with warmer air passing over the mountains above. It is essentially radiation fog confined by local topography, and can last for several days in calm conditions. In California's Central Valley, Valley fog is often referred to as Tule fog. For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... Fljótsdalur in East Iceland, a rather flat valley In geology, a valley (also called a vale or dale) is a depression with predominant extent in one direction. ... Smoke rising in Lochcarron is stopped by an overlying layer of warmer air. ... For discussion of land surfaces themselves, see Terrain. ... This article is about Californias Central Valley. ... Tule fog (IPA: ) is a thick ground fog that settles in the San Joaquin Valley and Sacramento Valley areas of Californias Great Central Valley. ...


Ice fog is any kind of fog where the droplets have frozen into extremely tiny crystals of ice in midair. Generally this requires temperatures at or below −35 °C (−30 °F), making it common only in and near the Arctic and Antarctic regions. It is most often seen in urban areas where it is created by the freezing of water vapor present in automobile exhaust and combustion -products from heating and power generation. Urban ice fog can become extremely dense and will persist day and night until the temperature rises. Extremely small amounts of ice fog falling from the sky form a type of precipitation called ice crystals, often reported in Barrow, Alaska. Ice fog often leads to the visual phenomenon of light pillars. In physics and chemistry, freezing is the process whereby a liquid turns to a solid when cold enough. ... For other uses, see Crystal (disambiguation). ... This article is about water ice. ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... Greek ἀνταρκτικός, opposite the arctic) is a continent surrounding the Earths South Pole. ... Diamond dust is the name commonly used to refer to a ground-level cloud composed of tiny ice crystals. ... Barrow is a city in North Slope Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Pillars from uncovered work lights above University of Alaska Fairbanks (J. Hall) A light pillar is a visual phenomenon created by the reflection of light from ice crystals with parallel planar surfaces. ...


Freezing fog occurs when liquid fog droplets freeze to surfaces, forming white rime ice. This is very common on mountain tops which are exposed to low clouds. It is equivalent to freezing rain, and essentially the same as the ice that forms inside a freezer which is not of the "frostless" or "frost-free" type. In some areas such as in the State of Oregon, the term "freezing fog" refers to fog where water vapor is super-cooled filling the air with small ice crystals similar to very light snow. It seems to make the fog "tangible", as if one could "grab a handful". Categories: Stub | Forms of water ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... Freezing Rain is a type of precipitation that begins as snow at higher altitude, falling from a cloud towards earth, melts completely on its way down while passing through a layer of air above freezing temperature, and then encounters a layer below freezing at lower level to become supercooled. ... A freezer is a home appliance, usually found above the refrigerator that keeps foods frozen. ...


Artificial fog is artificially generated fog that is usually created by vaporizing a water and glycol-based or glycerine-based fluid. The fluid is injected into a heated block, and evaporates quickly. The resulting pressure forces the vapor out of the exit. Upon coming into contact with cool outside air the vapor forms a fog—see fog machine. Ethylene glycol (IUPAC name:ethane-1,2-diol) is a chemical compound widely used as an automotive antifreeze (coolant). ... Glycerin, also known as glycerine and glycerol, and less commonly as 1,2,3-propanetriol, 1,2,3-trihydroxypropane, glyceritol, and glycyl alcohol is a colorless, odorless, hygroscopic, and sweet tasting viscous liquid. ... A heavy duty smoke machine feeding smoke into a blower to generate fog effects for open air location filming. ...


Garua fog is a type of fog which occurs at the western coast of Chile. The normal fog produced by the sea travels inland, but suddenly meets an area of hot air. This causes the water particles of fog to shrink by evaporation, producing a transparent mist. Garua fog is nearly invisible, yet it still forces drivers to use windshield wipers.


Hail fog sometimes occurs in the vicinity of significant hail accumulations due to decreased temperature and increased moisture leading to saturation in a very shallow layer near the surface. It most often occurs when there is a warm, humid layer atop the hail and when wind is light. This ground fog tends to be localized but can be extremely dense and abrupt. It may form shortly after the hail falls; when the hail has had time to cool the air and as it absorbs heat when melting and evaporating. This is the only place I could find all the types. [1] This article is about the precipitation. ... This diagram shows the nomenclature for the different phase transitions. ... In physics, melting is the process of heating a solid substance to a point (called the melting point) where it turns into a liquid. ... Vaporization redirects here. ...


Fog shadows

These fascinating shadows look odd since humans are not used to seeing shadows in three dimensions. The thin fog is just dense enough to be illuminated by the light that passes through the gaps in a structure or in a tree. As a result, the path of an object shadow through the "fog" appears darkened. In a sense, these shadow lanes are similar to crepuscular rays, which are caused by cloud shadows, but here, they are caused by the shadows of solid objects.
All Sky Crepuscular Rays Crepuscular rays at sunset Crepuscular rays at Telstra Tower, Canberra Mid afternoon rays 1 Rays in San Francisco Crepuscular Rays at Ocean Beach, San Francisco Crepuscular rays, in atmospheric optics, also known as sun rays or Gods rays, are rays of sunlight that appear to...


Samples of fog shadows of different objects:

See also

The Great Smog also referred to as the Big Smoke, befell London starting on 5 December 1952, and lasted until 9 December 1952. ... Dutch pea soup Pea soup is soup made, typically, from dried peas. ... Thank You, Fog: last poems by W. H. Auden is a posthumous book of poems by W. H. Auden, published in 1974. ... Wystan Hugh Auden (21 February 1907 – 29 September 1973) IPA: ;[1], who signed his works W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet, regarded by many as one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. ... List of rail accidents from 2000 to the present. ... Autoland is a triple-redundant autopilot system that automatically lands an airplane (with careful monitering needed from the pilot). ... Blinker redirects here. ... The lighting system of a motor vehicle consists of lighting and signalling devices mounted or integrated to the front, sides and rear of the vehicle. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A haboob is a type of intense dust storm characteristic of very dry regions. ... Dramatic morning mist Mist is a phenomenon of a liquid in small droplets floating through air. ... Pogonip is a type of fog consisting of ice crystals suspended in the air. ... For other uses, see Smog (disambiguation). ... Tule fog (IPA: ) is a thick ground fog that settles in the San Joaquin Valley and Sacramento Valley areas of Californias Great Central Valley. ... camanchacas: a cloud bank that forms in some parts of S. America along the east coast of S. America. ... Fog Investigation and Dispersal Operation (FIDO) was an extraordinary system used for dispersing fog from an airfield so that aircraft could land safely. ... Fogging in photography is the deterioration in the quality of the image caused either by extraneous light or the effects of a processing chemical. ... Anti-fog agents, also known as anti-fogging agents and treatments, prevent the condensation of water on a surface in the form of small droplets which resemble fog. ... Runway Visual Range (RVR) is an aeronautical term essentially meaning the visibility distance on the runway of an airport. ... In Meteorology, ability is a measure of the nothingness at which an object or light can be seen. ... Whiteout is a weather condition in which visibility is reduced by snow and diffuse lighting from overcast clouds. ...

References

  1. ^ Marshall, Tim; David Hoadley (sketches) (May 1995). Storm Talk, 39. 
  • Maria K. Filonczuk, Daniel R. Cayan, Laurence G. Riddle, Variability of marine fog along the California coast, SIO-Reference, No 95-2, Climate Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, July 1995.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Tim Marshall is a civil engineer and meteorologist concentrating on damage analysis, particularly that from wind and other weather phenomena. ... David Hoadley (April 29, 1774—1839) was an American architect who worked in New Haven and Middlesex counties in Connecticut. ...

External links

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ... In thermodynamics, an adiabatic process or an isocaloric process is a thermodynamic process in which no heat is transferred to or from the working fluid. ... The lapse rate is defined as the negative of the rate of change in an atmospheric variable, usually temperature, with height observed while moving upwards through an atmosphere. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... Solar irradiance spectrum at top of atmosphere. ... A surface weather analysis for the United States on October 21, 2006. ... In Meteorology, ability is a measure of the nothingness at which an object or light can be seen. ... Vorticity is a mathematical concept used in fluid dynamics. ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Condensation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... Aerosol pollution over Northern India and Bangladesh - NASA Cloud condensation nuclei or CCNs (also known as cloud seeds) are small particles (typically 0. ... Water vapor or water vapour (see spelling differences), also aqueous vapor, is the gas phase of water. ... Convection in the most general terms refers to the movement of currents within fluids (i. ... In meteorology, convective available potential energy (CAPE) is the amount of energy a parcel of air would have if lifted a certain distance vertically through the atmosphere. ... Convective inhibition (CIN or CINH) is a meteorlogic parameter that measures the amount of energy that will prevent an air parcel from rising from the surface to the level of free convection. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The convective temperature (CT or Tc) is the approximate temperature that air near the surface much reach for cloud formation without mechanical lift. ... The lifted index (LI) is the temperature difference between an air parcel lifted adiabatically and the temperature of the environment at a pressure height in the atmosphere, usually 500 hPa (mb). ... For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... The dew point (or dewpoint) is the temperature which a given parcel of air must be cooled, at constant barometric pressure, for water vapor to condense into water. ... Equivalent temperature is the temperature of an air parcel from which we would have completely extracted its water vapor content by an adiabatic process. ... The heat index (HI) or humidex is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to determine an apparent temperature — how hot it actually feels. ... Heat Index (HI) is an index that combines air temperature and relative humidity to determine an apparent temperature — how hot it actually feels. ... The term humidity is usually taken in daily language to refer to relative humidity. ... The potential temperature of a parcel of air at pressure is the temperature that the parcel would acquire if adiabatically brought to a standard reference pressure , usually 1 bar. ... Equivalent potential temperature, commonly referred to as Theta-e , is a measure of the instability of air at a given pressure, humidity, and temperature. ... Annual mean sea surface temperature for the World Ocean. ... Wet-bulb temperature ... Wind chill is the apparent temperature felt on the exposed human (or animal) body due to the combination of air temperature and wind speed. ... This article is about pressure in the physical sciences. ... Atmospheric pressure is the pressure at any given point in the Earths atmosphere. ... Density lines and isobars cross in a baroclinic fluid (top). ... For other uses, see Cloud (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cirrus uncinus is a type of cirrus cloud. ... A KHI on the planet Saturn, formed at the interaction of two bands of the planets atmosphere A KH instability rendered visible by clouds over Mount Duval in Australia Kelvin–Helmholtz instability can occur when velocity shear is present within a continuous fluid or when there is sufficient velocity... Cirrostratus showing an extremely large halo. ... A cirrocumulus is a high-altitude cloud, usually occurring at 20,000-40,000 ft (6,000-12,000 m). ... Cumulonimbus with Pileus Pileus on a Cumulus cloud A pileus (Latin for cap) is a small, horizontal cloud that can appear above a cumulus or cumulonimbus cloud, giving the parent cloud a characteristic hoodlike appearance. ... Contrails are condensation trails (sometimes vapour trails): artificial cirrus clouds made by the exhaust of aircraft engines or wingtip vortices which precipitate a stream of tiny ice crystals in moist, frigid upper air. ... Altostratus is a cloud belonging to a class characterized by a generally uniform gray sheet or layer, lighter in color than nimbostratus and darker than cirrostratus. ... Image provided by Simon Eugster The altostratus undulatus is a type of low altocumulus cloud with signature undulations within it. ... ... The altocumulus undulatus is a mid-level cloud (about 8000 - 20,000 ft or 2400 - 6100 m), usually white or grey with layers or patches containing undulations that resemble waves or ripples in water. ... A mackerel sky is an indicator of moisture (the cloud) and instability (the cumulus form) at intermediate levels (2400-6100 m, 8000-20,000 ft). ... Altocumulus Castellanus is a family B type cloud. ... Lenticular clouds, technically known as altocumulus standing lenticularis, are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form at high altitudes, normally aligned at right-angles to the wind direction. ... For other uses, see Stratus. ... Nimbostratus has very few features. ... Cumulus humilis is what is commonly referred to as fair weather cumulus. In hot countries and over mountainous terrain these clouds occur at up to 6000 meters altitude, though elsewhere they are typically found lower. ... Cumulus mediocris is a cloud form of the cumulus family, slightly larger in vertical development than Cumulus humilis. ... A stratocumulus cloud belongs to a class characterized by large dark, rounded masses, usually in groups, lines, or waves, the individual elements being larger than those in altocumuli, and the whole being at a lower altitude, usually below 2,400 m (8,000 ft). ... An arcus cloud is a low, horizontal cloud formation associated with the leading edge of thunderstorm outflow (i. ... Cumulonimbus (Cb) is a type of cloud that is tall, dense, and involved in thunderstorms and other intense weather. ... A cumulonimbus incus cloud has a characteristic anvil-top shape. ... Cumulonimbus calvus is an moderately tall cumulonimbus cloud which is capable of precipitation, but has not yet reached the height where it forms into a cumulonimbus incus (anvil-top). ... Mammatus (also known as mamma or mammatocumulus, meaning breast-cloud) is a meteorological term applied to a cellular pattern of pouches hanging underneath the base of a cloud. ... Cumulus congestus clouds are characteristic of unstable areas of the atmosphere which are undergoing convection. ... Cumulus castellanus (from Latin castellanus, castle) is a type of cumulus cloud that is distinctive because it displays multiple towers arising from its top, indicating significant vertical air movement. ... Pyrocumulus, or fire cumulus, is a dense cumuliform cloud usually found at an altitude of 1500 m. ... The pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) is a type of cloud formed above a source of heat such as a wildfire or industrial plant. ... Noctilucent clouds (also known as polar mesospheric clouds) are rare bright cloudlike atmospheric phenomena visible in a deep twilight (the name means roughly night shining). They are most commonly observed in the summer months at latitudes between 50° and 60° (north and south). ... Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), also known as nacreous clouds, are clouds in the winter polar stratosphere at altitudes of 15,000–25,000 metres (50,000–80,000 ft). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Fog - definition of Fog in Encyclopedia (667 words)
Radiation fog is formed by the cooling of land after sunset by thermal (infrared) radiation in calm conditions with clear sky.
Steam fog is most common in polar regions, and around deeper and larger lakes in late autumn and early winter.
Ice fog is any kind of fog where the droplets have frozen into extremely tiny crystals of ice in midair.
Fog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (950 words)
Fog is particularly hazardous at airports, where some attempts have been made to develop methods (such as using heating or spraying salt particles) to aid fog dispersal.
Salt fog (or salt-fog) is characteristic of coastal atmospheres; the water droplets of this form of fog, formed by evaporated seawater, carry in solution microscopic particles of salt.
Artificial fog is artificially generated fog that is usually created by vaporizing a water and glycol-based or glycerine-based fluid.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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