FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Fletcher Henderson

Fletcher Hamilton Henderson, Jr. (December 18, 1897December 28, 1952) was an African American pianist, bandleader, arranger and composer, important in the development of big band jazz and Swing music. In the Gregorian Calendar, December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years), at which point there will be 13 days remaining to the end of the year. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from 1935 until the late 1940s. ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ...


Fletcher Henderson was born in Cuthbert, Georgia. His father was a principal and his mother taught piano. He attended Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia and graduated in 1920. After graduation, he moved to New York City to attend Columbia University for a master's degree in chemistry. However, he found his job prospects in chemistry to be very restricted due to his race, and turned to music for a living. Cuthbert is a city located in Randolph County, Georgia. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... Clark Atlanta University is a private, undergraduate and graduate institution educational institution in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Nickname: Hotlanta, The Big Peach, The ATL, A-Town Location in Fulton and DeKalb Counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: Country United States State Georgia Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


He worked for the Pace-Handy music company as a song demonstrator. He also worked at Black Swan Records as music director and pianist. He also lead the band accompanying singer Ethel Waters. His success in music made him forget about a career in chemistry. His band represented big band jazz. W.C. Handy photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 William Christopher Handy (November 16, 1873 - March 28, 1958) was an African American blues composer, often known as The Father of the Blues. ... Black Swan Records was a United States record label in the 1920s; it was the first to be owned and operated by, and marketed to, African Americans. ... Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896 – September 1, 1977) was an Oscar-nominated American blues vocalist and actress. ...

Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra (1925). From left: Howard Scott, Coleman Hawkins, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Dixon, Fletcher Henderson, Kaiser Marshall, Buster Bailey, Elmer Chambers, Charlie Green, Ralph Escudero and Don Redman. From Jazz: historia - teknik - utövare (Stockholm, 1940).
Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra (1925). From left: Howard Scott, Coleman Hawkins, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Dixon, Fletcher Henderson, Kaiser Marshall, Buster Bailey, Elmer Chambers, Charlie Green, Ralph Escudero and Don Redman. From Jazz: historia - teknik - utövare (Stockholm, 1940).

In 1922 he formed his own band, which was resident first at the Club Alabam then at the Roseland, and quickly became known as the best "Colored" band in New York. For a time his ideas of arrangement were heavily influenced by those of Paul Whiteman, but when Louis Armstrong joined his orchestra in 1924 Henderson realized there could be a much richer potential for jazz band orchestration. Henderson's band also boasted the formidable arranging talents of Don Redman. (It should be noted that Henderson actually did few arrangements in the 1920's; most of the best 'hot' sides he recorded were arranged by either Don Redman or Benny Carter. As an arranger, Henderson came into his own in the early 1930's.) Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 497 pixel Image in higher resolution (1182 × 735 pixel, file size: 518 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Fletcher Henderson (1897-1952) and his orchestra in 1925. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 497 pixel Image in higher resolution (1182 × 735 pixel, file size: 518 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Fletcher Henderson (1897-1952) and his orchestra in 1925. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (4 August 1901[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo, for satchel-mouth, and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... William C. Buster Bailey (1902-1967) was a talented Jazz musician specializing in the clarinet. ... One of the finest early trombonists and the first strong jazz soloist in the Fletcher Henderson orchestra (joining slightly before Louis Armstrong), Charlie Green played locally in Omaha (1920-1923) before his two stints with Henderson (July 1924-April 1926 and late 1928-spring 1929). ... Donald Matthew Redman (July 29, 1900, Piedmont, West Virginia - November 30, 1964, New York) was an American jazz musician, arranger, and composer. ...   (IPA: ; UN/LOCODE: SE STO) is the capital of Sweden, and consequently the site of its Government and Parliament as well as the residence of the Swedish head of state, King Carl XVI Gustaf. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... Louis Daniel Armstrong (4 August 1901[1] – July 6, 1971) (also known by the nicknames Satchmo, for satchel-mouth, and Pops) was an American jazz musician. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Donald Matthew Redman (July 29, 1900, Piedmont, West Virginia - November 30, 1964, New York) was an American jazz musician, arranger, and composer. ... Donald Matthew Redman (July 29, 1900, Piedmont, West Virginia - November 30, 1964, New York) was an American jazz musician, arranger, and composer. ... Bennett Lester Carter (August 8, 1907 – July 12, 2003) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, trumpeter, composer, arranger, and bandleader. ...


At one time or another, in addition to Armstrong, the band featured Henry "Red" Allen, Joe Smith, Rex Stewart, Tommy Ladnier, Doc Cheatham and Roy Eldridge on trumpet. Reed men Coleman Hawkins, Buster Bailey, Benny Carter and Chu Berry also were in and out of Fletcher's band. Sun Ra also worked as an arranger during the 1940's during Henderson's engagement at the Club De Lisa in Chicago. Sun Ra himself said that on first hearing Henderson's orchestra as a teenager he assumed that they must be angels because no human could produce such beautiful music. Henry Red Allen (January 7, 1906 - April 17, 1967) was an influential jazz trumpeter. ... Joseph Genesis Smith(born 18 August 1989 in Slough, Berkshire, England) is a British singer who featured on the third series of The X Factor, where he finished in the final 27. ... Rex Stewart (1907–1967) was an American jazz cornetist best known for his work with the Duke Ellington orchestra. ... Tommy (Thomas J.) Ladnier (May 28, 1900 - June 4, 1939) was an American jazz trumpeter. ... Adolphus Anthony Cheatham, much better known as Doc Cheatham (13 June 1905 - 2 June 1997) was a jazz trumpeter, singer, and bandleader. ... Roy David Eldridge (January 30, 1911 – February 6, 1989) was a jazz trumpet player in the Swing era. ... Coleman Hawkins Coleman Randolph Hawkins, nicknamed Hawk and sometimes Bean, (November 21, 1901 or 1904 - May 19, 1969) was a prominent jazz tenor saxophone musician. ... William C. Buster Bailey (1902-1967) was a talented Jazz musician specializing in the clarinet. ... Bennett Lester Carter (August 8, 1907 – July 12, 2003) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, trumpeter, composer, arranger, and bandleader. ... Leon Chu Berry (1908 - 1941) was an American jazz saxophonist born on September 13, 1908 in Wheeling, West Virginia. ... Sun Ra (Born Herman Poole Blount; legal name Le Sonyr Ra [1]; born May 22, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama, died May 30, 1993 in Birmingham, Alabama) was an innovative jazz composer, bandleader, piano and synthesizer player, who came to be known as much for his cosmic philosophy as for... Sun Ra (Born Herman Poole Blount; legal name Le Sonyr Ra [1]; born May 22, 1914 in Birmingham, Alabama, died May 30, 1993 in Birmingham, Alabama) was an innovative jazz composer, bandleader, piano and synthesizer player, who came to be known as much for his cosmic philosophy as for...


Beginning in the early 1930s, Fletcher's piano-playing younger brother, Horace Henderson contributed to the arrangements of the band. He later led a band of his own that also received critical acclaim. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Horace Henderson (1904–1988), younger brother of Fletcher Henderson, was an American jazz pianist, arranger, and bandleader. ...


Although the band was very popular, Henderson had little success managing the band. He was well regarded as an arranger and his arrangements became influential. In addition to his own band he arranged for several other bands, including those of Teddy Hill, Isham Jones, and most famously, Benny Goodman. Isham Jones (31 January 1894 – 19 October 1956) was a United States bandleader, violinist, saxophonist and songwriter. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In 1934, Goodman's Orchestra was selected as a house band for the "Let's Dance" radio program. Since he needed new charts every week for the show, his friend John Hammond suggested that he purchase some Jazz charts from Henderson. Many of Goodman's hits from the swing music were arranged by Henderson for his own band in the late 20s and early 30s. John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910–July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... The Swing Era was the period of time (1935-1946) when big band swing music was the most popular music in America. ...


In 1939 he disbanded his own band and joined Goodman's, first as both pianist and arranger and then working full time as arranger. He reformed bands of his own several times in the 1940s, toured with Ethel Waters again in 1948 - 1949. Henderson suffered a stroke in 1950 resulting in partial paralysis that ended his days as a pianist. He died in New York City. 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Ethel Waters (October 31, 1896 – September 1, 1977) was an Oscar-nominated American blues vocalist and actress. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA),[1] is an acute neurological injury in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


A good source for information on Fletcher Henderson is The Fletcher Henderson Story a 3 CD Box Set sampling Henderson's music with extensive liner notes by jazz scholar Frank Driggs.


He was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African Americans. Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
PBS - JAZZ A Film By Ken Burns: Selected Artist Biography - Fletcher Henderson (1175 words)
Fletcher Henderson was the brother of Horace Henderson and led the most important of the pioneering big bands, which helped to set the pattern for most later big jazz bands playing arranged music.
Henderson's band was no different from the thousands of dance bands that were springing up across the USA in response to the vogue for social dancing.
Henderson's arrangements were an important element in Goodman's rapid rise to popularity, which in turn triggered the enormous success of swing bands from 1935 to 1945.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m