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Encyclopedia > Fleet Review, Royal Navy

British tradition, where the monarch reviews the massed Royal Navy. Allegedly dates back to 1400s. Not at regular intervals (44 have occurred to date), and originally occurring when the fleet was mobilised for war, or for a 'show of strength' to discourage potential enemies. However, since the 19th century they have often been held for the coronation or for special royal jubilees (indeed, since Edward VII it has been regularly held at each coronation) - this tradition may have come to an end with the cancellation of the 2002 one for Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee on cost grounds (it remains to be seen if her heir Charles will hold one for his coronation). The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... A coronation is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... A coronation is a ceremony marking the investment of a monarch with regal power through, amongst other symbolic acts, the placement of a crown upon his or her head. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Elizabeth II makes an official appearance at the CBC Headquarters as part of her Jubilee goodwill tour, October 2002. ... The Prince of Wales The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Windsor)aka the The Butler Bummer (born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of the Single Celled Interlectual Fish that live at the bottom of the ocean. ...


Needing a natural large, sheltered and deep anchorage, it usually occurs in the Solent off Spithead (although, Southend, Torbay, the Firth of Clyde as well as some overseas ports have also hosted reviews - in the examples below, the venue is Spithead unless otherwise noted). Satellite image showing the Solent, separating the Isle of Wight from mainland Britain The Solent is a stretch of sea separating the Isle of Wight from the mainland of Great Britain. ... Categories: UK geography stubs ... Southend is the name of a number of locations: Southend-on-Sea is the name of a town in Essex, UK Southend, Kintyre is the name of a village in Kintyre, Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Torbay is an east facing bay at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ...

Contents


Medieval

  • June 1346 - Edward III, before sailing to war with France
  • 1415 - Generally acknowledged as the first fleet review on record, by Henry V of England, at Southampton, before sailing for his first French campaign that ended in the Battle of Agincourt

// Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... Edward III King of England Edward III (13 November 1312–21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English Kings of medieval times. ... Events Friedrich I Hohenzollern (b. ... Henry V, (August 9 or September 16, 1387 – August 31, 1422), King of England (1413-1422), son of Henry IV by Mary de Bohun, was born at Monmouth, Wales, in August or September 1386 or 1387. ... Civic Centre, Southampton Southampton is a city and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... Combatants Kingdom of England Kingdom of France Commanders Henry V of England Jean Le Maingre Charles dAlbret Strength 6,000-9,000 troops 12,000-50,000 troops Casualties 100-500 5,000-8,000 with over 1,000 prisoners {{{notes}}} The Battle of Agincourt (French: Bataille dAzincourt...

Stuart

Events March 18 – Short-timed experiment of the first public buses holding 8 passengers begins in Paris May 3/May 2 - Catherine of Braganza marries Charles II of England – as part of the dowry, Portugal cedes Bombay and Tangier to England May 9 - Samuel Pepys witnessed a Punch and Judy... Charles II (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (retrospectively de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... -1... Mary II (30 April 1662–28 December 1694) reigned as Queen of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689 until her death, and as Queen of Scotland (as Mary II of Scotland) from 11 April 1689 until her death. ... The Battle of Barfleur, 29 May 1692 by Richard Paton, painted 18th century. ... Barfleur is a small picturesque fishing-port in north-western France, in the Manche département in the Basse-Normandie région. ...

1700-1837

Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... 1773 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... Kew Palace. ... George II may refer to: George II of Württemberg-Mömpelgard (1626–1699). ... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... The Fifty Years War, sometimes referred to as the 87 year old war or the French and Indian War, (1754 and 1756–1763) pitted Great Britain, Prussia, and Hanover against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden, and Saxony. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Battle of the Saintes, 12 April 1782: surrender of the Ville de Paris by Thomas Whitcombe, painted 1783, shows Hoods Barfleur, centre, attacking the French flagship Ville de Paris, right. ... 1778 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738–29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Glorious First of June (also known as the Third Battle of Ushant and in French as the Bataille du 13 prairial an 2) was a naval battle fought in the Atlantic Ocean on June 1, 1794 between the Royal Navy and the navy of Revolutionary France. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The 1814 Treaty of Paris, signed on May 30, 1814, ended the war between France and the Sixth Coalition of the United Kingdom, Russia, Austria, Sweden and Prussia. ... Ships of the line were 1st, 2nd, or 3rd-rated ships in the rating system of the Royal Navy. ... Frigate is a name which has been used for several distinct types of warships at different times. ... The Napoleonic Wars were a series of wars fought during Napoleon Bonapartes rule over France. ... George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820. ...

Queen Victoria

17 occurred during her reign, the most for any monarch. Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ...

  • March 1842, her first, held by herself and Prince Albert as a "Grand Naval Review." The Queen on this occasion endeared herself to her sailors, drinking a mess basin of grog, and liking it!
  • 1844, May - visit of the King of Saxony; and October, on the visit of Tsar Nicholas I, King Louis-Philippe of France and Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia, both were a show of strength
  • June 1845, inspecting the experimental squadron, from the new HMY Victoria and Albert. The Board of Admiralty attended in their steam yacht, the Black Eagle. Some place this not 1814 as the last time that a Royal Review consisted only of sailing ships, and nearly the last time that the Queen could watch the HMS Trafalgar (1841)'s men run aloft and set the sails "with feline agility and astonishing celerity."
  • August 1853, fleet mobilisation for Crimean War [1], including for the first time steam screw ships of the line.
  • 10th March 1854. Wary of a Russian break out into the North Sea, due to the numbers of their ships in the Baltic, the British Admiralty brought together a force to contain them. This first division of the Baltic fleet was commanded by Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Napier. Napier's task was to find naval recruits and train them as quickly as possible. From the screw yacht-tender, HMS Fairy,and two months before her 35th birthday (which it was perhaps also intended to commemorate), Queen Victoria reviewed Napier's fleet at Spithead, shortly before it set sail, including (on 10th March 1854) a review of the first part of the fleet to set sail only eighteen days before Britain declared war on Russia. According to reports in the London Illustrated News (which printed a special edition for the occasion, with drawings of various scenes from the day of the Review), Fairy reviewed the fleet as it steamed up a path created by the ships anchored on each side, then a day later led the fleet out of Spithead as it began its journey to the Baltic.
  • April 1856, of the Baltic fleet on its return. First recorded example of the evening illumination of the fleet. Showed lessons learnt from the Crimean War, with the first of the ironclad ships present in the form of 4 1,500-ton floating batteries. Over 100 gunboats were present, "puffing about like locomotive engines with wisps of white steam trailing from their funnels."
  • August 1865, on visit of the French fleet
  • July 1867, held for Abd-ul-Aziz, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, and his Viceroy of Egypt, Ismail of Egypt. For the first time every ship flew the White Ensign, after the dissolution of the old Red, White and Blue Squadrons. New designs were the five-masted HMS Minotaur (1863) with her powerful broadside, and the graceful 14-knot ironclad sister-ships HMS Warrior (1860) and HMS Black Prince (1861).
  • June 1873, for the visit of Nasser-al-Din Shah(18481896), the Shah of Persia
  • August 1878, of the reserve squardon
  • July 1887, Golden Jubilee. Notable for the appearance of a Nordenfelt submarine (though the first RN Submarine would be Holland 1 20 years later)
  • August 1889, on the visit of Kaiser Wilhelm II and his Admiral von Tirpitz, a show of strength
  • August 1891, on visit of the French fleet
  • August 1896, on visit of M.P.'s and Li Hung Chang
  • June 1897, Diamond Jubilee, notable for being presided over by the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) since she was too frail to attend in person, and for the appearance of the Turbinia.
  • August 1899, her last, notable for being presided over by the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) since she was too frail to attend in person, and for the visit of the German Squadron.

1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Nicholas I Pavlovich (Russian: Николай I Павлович, July 6 (June 25, Old Style), 1796–March 2 (February 18, Old Style), 1855) was the Emperor of Russia and king of Poland from 1825 until his death in 1855. ... Louis-Philippe of France (October 6, 1773–August 26, 1850), served as the Orleanist king of the French from 1830 to 1848. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... HMY Victoria and Albert was a twin paddle steamer launched 25 April 1843. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United Kingdom, France, Ottoman Empire, Sardinia Imperial Russia Commanders Strength 250,000 British 400,000 French 10,000 Sardinian 1,200,000 Russian Casualties 17,500 British 30,000 French 2,050 Sardinian killed and wounded 256,000 killed and wounded {{{notes}}} The Crimean War lasted from 28 March... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral Sir Charles Napier (6 March 1786–6 November 1860) was a British admiral whose 54 years in the Royal Navy included service in the Napoleonic Wars, Syrian War and the Crimean War, and a period commanding the Portuguese navy in the Liberal Wars. ... The Illustrated London News was a magazine founded by Herbert Ingram and his friend Mark Lemon, the editor of Punch magazine. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United Kingdom, France, Ottoman Empire, Sardinia Imperial Russia Commanders Strength 250,000 British 400,000 French 10,000 Sardinian 1,200,000 Russian Casualties 17,500 British 30,000 French 2,050 Sardinian killed and wounded 256,000 killed and wounded {{{notes}}} The Crimean War lasted from 28 March... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz Abd-ul-aziz (Arabic: عبد العزيز ) (February 9, 1830 – 1876) was the sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1861 to May 30, 1876. ... The Osmanli Dynasty, also the House of Osman, ruled the Ottoman Empire from 1281 to 1923, beginning with Osman I (not counting his father, Ertuğrul), though the dynasty was not proclaimed until 1383 when Murad I declared himself sultan. ... Khedive (from Persian for lord) was a title created in 1867 by the Ottoman Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz for the then-governor of Egypt, Ismail Pasha. ... redirect Ismail Pasha ... The White Ensign. ... HMS Minotaur was a British Royal Navy ironclad of the Minotaur class. ... HMS Warrior (1860) (also known as Vernon III and Oil Fuel Hulk C77) was the worlds first ocean-going iron-hulled armoured battleship. ... HMS Black Prince, launched 27 February 1861, was the third ship of that name to serve with the British Royal Navy. ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Nasser-al-Din Shah Nasser-al-Din Shah Qajar (sometimes called Nassereddin) (1831 1896) was the Shah of Persia from September 13, 1848 until his death on May 1, 1896. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... One of the worlds longest-lasting monarchies, the Iranian monarchy went through many transformations over the centuries, from the days of Persia to the creation of what is now modern day Iran. ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ... Thorsten Nordenfelt (1842-1920), Swedish inventor and industrialist. ... Holland 1 was the first submarine commissioned by the Royal Navy, the first in a six-boat batch of the Holland class submarine. ... 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Wilhelm II of Prussia and Germany, Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert von Hohenzollern (January 27, 1859 - June 4, 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and the last King (König) of Prussia from 1888 - 1918. ... Alfred von Tirpitz Alfred von Tirpitz (March 19, 1849 – March 6, 1930) was a German Admiral, Minister of State and Commander of the Kaiserliche Marine in World War I from 1914 until 1916. ... 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Li Hongzhang (Chinese: 李鴻章; pinyin: Lǐ Hóngzhāng, Wade-Giles: Li Hung-chang) (February 15, 1823 - November 7, 1901) was a general who ended several major rebellions, and a leading statesman of the late Chinese Qing Empire. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... The Turbinia Turbinia was the first steam turbine powered steamship, built as an experimental vessel in 1894 and demonstrated dramatically at the Spithead Navy Review in 1897, setting the standard for the next generation of steamships. ... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...

20th century to present

Edward VII

  • August 1902, Coronation Review, the first time in the modern era that a review was used to mark the coronation
  • August 1905, visit of the French fleet
  • August 1907, review of the reconstituted Home Fleet
  • July 1909, review of Home Fleet and Atlantic Fleet

Edward VII King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King Edward VII (Albert Edward) (9 November 1841–6 May 1910) was the first British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Home Fleet is the traditional name of the fleet of the Royal Navy that protects the United Kingdoms territorial waters. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Home Fleet is the traditional name of the fleet of the Royal Navy that protects the United Kingdoms territorial waters. ... The British Atlantic Fleet was a major fleet formation of the Royal Navy. ...

George V

D L Davenport, at the time a young cadet serving on board HMS Iron Duke (1912) (he later went onto a successful naval career, eventually reaching the rank of Rear Admiral), noted his impressions of this event in his diary: King George V King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the House... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This may refer to the: British Houses of Parliament. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Southend is the name of a number of locations: Southend-on-Sea is the name of a town in Essex, UK Southend, Kintyre is the name of a village in Kintyre, Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... HMS Iron Duke was a battleship of the Royal Navy, the lead ship of her class, named in honour of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ...

 “Turned out at 0545 and scrubbed focsle…after breakfast we gave all the brightwork a final polish and generally cleaned up… after lunch we fell in on deck ... All the ships with saluting guns fired a royal salute of 21 guns the noise was not as bad as we were led to expect. But the smoke screened most of the ships for some minutes… After tea ‘Clean Lower Deck’ was sounded and we had to fall in for manning ship my position on Y Turret grid on the Quarter Deck was an excellent one as we could see the yacht approaching… as the V&A approached the band played ‘God Save the King’ and the guard presented arms in the Royal Salute. When the King was halfway past we gave 3 cheers. You could just see the King on the Bridge, Saluting …About ½ hour later we fell in again as he passed the other side. After supper we watched the illuminations… after half hour all the lights were turned off and red flares were lit on deck, each held by a sailor at the guardrail. These did not look very good except for the first few seconds… the ships remained illuminated for the rest of the time until midnight... We turned in about 2345 very tired. 

forecastle with figurehead Grand Turk Focsle of the Prince William, a modern square rigged ship, in the North Sea. ... The Victoria and Albert III a Royal Yacht of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. ... This article is on the British patriotic anthem. ...

George VI

  • Thursday May 20th 1937 - Coronation Fleet Review. External link After the small beginnings of naval airpower at the 1911 review, five carriers were present this time.

Described by one naval officer in a letter to a friend - George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George) (December 14, 1895 - February 6, 1952) was the third British monarch of the House of Windsor, reigning from December 11, 1936 to February 6, 1952. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ...

 "The day was quite as bad as I feared but my sisters are insistent that they enjoyed it all" 

It was also the occassion of the infamous "Woodroofe Incident" in the BBC Radio coverage (known by the phrase 'The Fleet's Lit Up!') Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ...

  • May 1944, in secret, of the D-Day invasion fleet - also, ironically, the largest review to date (800 vessels, ranging from capital vessels to small minesweeper and landing craft)!

1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ...

Elizabeth II

Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... 1953 (MCMLIII) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Elizabeth II in an official portrait as Queen of Canada (on the occasion of her Golden Jubilee in 2002, wearing the Sovereigns badges of the Order of Canada and the Order of Military Merit) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary) (born 21 April 1926), styled HM The... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Looking north from Greenock over the Tail of the Bank today, the cranes of the container terminal can be seen to the right, while on the other side of the Firth of Clyde the waters of the Gare Loch are just visible beyond the tail of the Rosneath peninsula. ... The Firth of Clyde forms a large area of coastal water, sheltered from the Atlantic ocean by the Kintyre peninsula which encloses the outer firth in Argyll and Ayrshire, Scotland. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... The NATO flag NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, D.C., on... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... Elizabeth IIs Silver Jubilee and her domestic and international visits proved very popular with her subjects. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Fleet review The Carriers assembled at the Review. ... Trafalgar 200 is a series of events in 2005 held mostly in the United Kingdom to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, where a Royal Navy fleet led by Admiral Nelson (who died in the battle) destroyed a joint Franco-Spanish fleet during the Napoleonic Wars. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Elizabeth II makes an official appearance at the CBC Headquarters as part of her Jubilee goodwill tour, October 2002. ...

How to expand the above

To increase these, refer to ships in What links here - often gives their position in the line-up, for example


External links

Museum of the Royal Navy in the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard section of HMNB Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire. ...

 
 

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