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Encyclopedia > Flatiron Building
Flatiron [Fuller] Building

Flatiron Building, 2004
Download high resolution version (1341x1944, 437 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Information
Location 175 Fifth Avenue
New York City
Coordinates 40°44′28″N 73°59′23″W / 40.74111, -73.98972Coordinates: 40°44′28″N 73°59′23″W / 40.74111, -73.98972
Status Complete
Use Office building
Height
Top floor 285 feet (87 m)
Technical details
Floor count 22
Companies
Architect Daniel Burnham
John Wellborn Root

The Fuller Building or as it is better known, the Flatiron Building, is in the borough of Manhattan, and was one of the tallest buildings in New York City upon its completion in 1902. The building, at 175 Fifth Avenue, sits on a triangular island block at 23rd Street, Fifth Avenue, and Broadway, facing Madison Square. Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... An office is a room or other area in which people work, but may also denote a position within an organisation with specific duties attached to it (see officer, office-holder, official); the latter is in fact an earlier usage, office as place originally referring to the location of one... Daniel H. Burnham. ... John Wellborn Root (January 10, 1850 - January 15, 1891) was a significant U.S. architect who worked out of Chicago with Daniel Burnham. ... There are several buildings called the Flatiron Building, all named for their triangular flatiron-like shape. ... The Five Boroughs of New York City: 1: Manhattan 2: Brooklyn 3: Queens 4: Bronx 5: Staten Island In New York City, a borough is a unique form of government used to administer the five constituent counties that make up the city; it differs significantly from other borough forms of... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... 23rd Street runs from river to river across Manhattan, carrying two-way traffic. ... Street sign at corner of Fifth Avenue and East 57th Street Fifth Avenue, early morning photograph, looking south from Thirty-eighth Street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the center of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... Madison Square, 1908. ...

Contents

Architecture

The Flatiron Building was designed by Chicago's Daniel Burnham in the Beaux-Arts style. Like a classical Greek column, its limestone and glazed terra-cotta façade is separated into three parts horizontally. Since it was one of the first buildings to use a steel skeleton, the building could be constructed to 285 feet (87 m), which would have been very difficult with other construction methods of that time. Daniel H. Burnham. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Elmslea Chambers in Goulburn, New South Wales, Australia - built in 1933, it was one of the first buildings in Australia to use coloured polychrome terracotta in its façade which features a fine relief of birds, flowers, leaves and typical Art Deco sunbursts under the windows. ...


The initial design by Daniel Burnham shows a similar design to the one constructed, but with a far more elaborate crown with numerous setbacks near the pinnacle. A clock face can also be seen. However, this was later removed from the design. Setbacks on the Pyramid of Djoser. ...


The signature edge of the Flatiron Building was covered in black scaffolding from December 2005 to March 2006 for renovations. Sidewalk-level scaffolding remains. This article is about the temporary framework. ...


Cultural impact

I found myself agape, admiring a skyscraper — the prow of the Flatiron Building, to be particular, ploughing up through the traffic of Broadway and Fifth Avenue in the late-afternoon light."

-- H.G. Wells, 1906

The building, which took its name from the triangular lot it was built on[1] (the Flatiron block, so called because it was shaped like a clothes iron), was officially named the Fuller Building after George A. Fuller, founder of the company that financed its construction two years after his death.[2] Locals took an immediate interest in the building, placing bets on how far the debris would spread when the wind knocked it down. H. G. Wells at the door of his house at Sandgate Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 - August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for his science fiction novels such as The War of the Worlds and The Time Machine. ... An iron Ironing or smoothing is the work of using a heated tool to remove wrinkles from washed clothes. ...

Close-up of Flatiron Building
Close-up of Flatiron Building

The building is also said to have helped coin the phrase "23 skidoo" or scram, from what cops would shout at men who tried to get glimpses of women's dresses being blown up by the winds created by the triangular building.[3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 605 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1632x1224, 605 KB)Photographed and uploaded by user:Geographer. ... Close Up is a half hour long New Zealand current affairs program produced by Television New Zealand. ... 23 Skidoo is an American slang popularized in the early Twentieth Century (first appearing before World War I and becoming popular in the Roaring Twenties). ...

View from Madison Square Park
View from Madison Square Park

At the rounded tip, the triangular tower is only 6.5 feet (2 meters) wide. The 22-story Flatiron Building, with a height of 285 ft (87 meters), is often considered the oldest surviving skyscraper in Manhattan, though in fact the Park Row Building (1899) is both older and taller. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... The Park Row Building is a skyscraper built in 1899 in the Financial District in the New York City borough of Manhattan, across from New York City Hall. ...


Today the Flatiron is a popular spot for tourist photographs, a National Historic Landmark since 1989[4], and a functioning office building, currently home to several book publishers, most of them under the umbrella of Holtzbrinck Publishers. It was also used as the Daily Bugle building in the Spider-Man films. The surrounding area of Manhattan is named the Flatiron District for its signature building. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Daily Bugle is a fictional New York City newspaper that is a regular fixture in the Marvel Universe, most prominently in Spider-Man and its derivative media. ... The Spider-Man film series currently consists of three superhero films based on the fictional Marvel Comics character of the same name, portrayed by Tobey Maguire. ... The famous Flatiron building from which the district is named. ...

On April 19, 1917 the cowcatcher of the Flatiron Building United Cigar Store was transformed into a mock fort for the "Wake up America Day" parade.
On April 19, 1917 the cowcatcher of the Flatiron Building United Cigar Store was transformed into a mock fort for the "Wake up America Day" parade.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...

See also

The Flatiron District is a small area in midtown Manhattan named after the Flatiron Building. ...

References

  • Skyscrapers, Antonino Terranova, White Star Publishers, 2003 (ISBN-8880952307)

Footnotes

  1. ^ New York Times item New Building on the Flatiron ("the famous 'flatiron' block"), March 3, 1901, page 8.
  2. ^ New York Times article Flatiron Structure to be Called the Fuller Building, August 9, 1902, page 3.
  3. ^ Andrew S. Dolkart. "The Architecture and Development of New York City: The Birth of the Skyscraper - Romantic Symbols", Columbia University, accessed May 15, 2007. "It is at a triangular site where Broadway and Fifth Avenue—the two most important streets of New York—meet at Madison Square, and because of the juxtaposition of the streets and the park across the street, there was a wind-tunnel effect here. In the early twentieth century, men would hang out on the corner here on Twenty-third Street and watch the wind blowing women's dresses up so that they could catch a little bit of ankle. This entered into popular culture and there are hundreds of postcards and illustrations of women with their dresses blowing up in front of the Flatiron Building. And it supposedly is where the slang expression "23 skidoo" comes from because the police would come and give the voyeurs the 23 skidoo to tell them to get out of the area."
  4. ^ National Park Service, National Historic Landmark survey (New York), retrieved May 27, 2007, 3.

Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Flatiron Building

Coordinates: 40°44′28″N, 73°59′23″W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Flatiron Building: Information From Answers.com (521 words)
The Fuller Building or as it is better known, the Flatiron Building, is located in the borough of Manhattan, and was one of the tallest buildings in New York City upon its completion in 1902.
The 22-story Flatiron Building, with a height of 285 ft (87 meters), is often considered the oldest surviving skyscraper in Manhattan, though in fact the Park Row Building (1899) is both older and taller.
Due to renovations, the signature edge of the Flatiron Building was covered in fl scaffolding from December 2005 to March 2006.
NEW YORK SCRAPERS - EARLY CENTURY I (3102 words)
The building had the heavy printing presses in the basement and lower floors, as usual, but the space not taken up by the newspaper's other staff was used as rentable space, utilizing the building's great height also for direct financial gain.
The building exterior was designated as a landmark in 1999 and in a 2002 conversion into a mixed-use building, the 1,000 replacement windows had to be approved by the city's Landmarks Commission.
After only occupying this building for less than a decade, the N.Y. Times moved to the nearby building at 229 W 43rd Street, next to the Paramount Building, in 1913 (from which the paper also acquired office space after its theater was gutted).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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