FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Flashback (literary technique)

In literature and film, a flashback (also called analepsis) takes the narrative back in time from the point the story has reached, to recount events that happened before and give the "back-story." Analepsis allows a narrative's discourse to re-order the story by "flashing back" to an earlier point in the story. In the opposite direction, a flashforward or prolepsis reveals events that will occur in the future. Literature is literally acquaintance with letters as in the first sense given in the Oxford English Dictionary (from the Latin littera meaning an individual written character (letter)). The term has generally come to identify a collection of texts, which in Western culture are mainly prose, both fiction and non-fiction... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed. ... It has been suggested that Elements of plot be merged into this article or section. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ... A flashforward (also sometimes known as flash-forward or flash-ahead) in a narrative occurs when one or more scenes representing an event expected, projected or imagined to occur at a time later than the present depiction (see also Glossary: Flashforward). ...


A variation of prolepsis is prophecy, as when Oedipus is told that he will sleep with his mother and kill his father. As we learn later in Sophocles' play, he does both despite his efforts to evade his fate. Prophecy, in a broad sense, is the prediction of future events. ... Oedipus and the Sphinx, from an 1879 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church Oedipus was the mythical king of Thebes, son of Laius and Jocasta, who, unknowingly, killed his father and married his mother. ... A Roman bust. ...


A good example of both analepsis and prolepsis is the first scene of La Jetée. As we learn a few minutes later, what we are seeing in that scene is a flashback to the past, since the present of the film's diegesis is a time directly following World War III. However, as we learn at the very end of the film, that scene also doubles as a prolepsis, since the dying man the boy is seeing is, in fact, himself. In other words, he is proleptically seeing his own death. We thus have an analepsis and prolepsis in the very same scene. La Jetée (1962 or 1963) (literally The Jetty or The Pier, but in this case idiomatically meaning The Terminal, as in an airport terminal) is a black and white 28-minute science fiction film by Chris Marker. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Analepsis was used extensively by author Ford Madox Ford. An author is the person who creates a written work, such as a book, story, article or the like. ... Ford Madox Ford (December 17, 1873 - June 26, 1939) was an English novelist and publisher. ...


The 1927 book The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder is the progenitor of the modern disaster epic in literature and film-making, where a single disaster intertwines the victims, whose lives are then explored by means of flashbacks to events leading up to the disaster. 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Bridge of San Luis Rey is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder. ... Thornton Wilder (April 17, 1897 – December 7, 1975) was an American playwright and novelist. ...


Flashbacks were also used in Robert Ludlum's novel The Janson Directive. The Scarlatti Inheritance, Ludlums first book, published 1971. ... PLOT: (Taken from the books inside cover) One of the worlds greatest men has been kidnapped. ...


In a story if flashbacks are presented non-chronologically it can be ambiguous what is the present of the story: if flashbacks are extensive and in chronological order, one can also say that these form the present of the story, while the rest of the story consists of flash forwards.


See also

In literature, Racconto and Flashback mean almost the same thing. ...

External Links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Flashback (literary technique) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (368 words)
In literature and film, a flashback (also called analepsis) takes the narrative back in time from the point the story has reached, to recount events that happened before and give the "back-story." Analepsis allows a narrative's discourse to re-order the story by "flashing back" to an earlier point in the story.
Flashbacks were also used in Robert Ludlum's novel The Janson Directive.
In a story if flashbacks are presented non-chronologically it can be ambiguous what is the present of the story: if flashbacks are extensive and in chronological order, one can also say that these form the present of the story, while the rest of the story consists of flash forwards.
Literary technique - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1167 words)
Literary technique is distinguished from literary genre as military tactics are from military strategy.
In this way, use of a technique can lead to the development of a new genre, as was the case with one of the first modern novels, Pamela by Samuel Richardson, which by using the epistolary technique gave birth to the epistolary novel.
Second-person narrative, a technique in which the main character is the reader, and the narrator is telling the reader what he or she is doing or did.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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