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Encyclopedia > Flash mob
A downtown Toronto pillow fight flash mob.

A flash mob is a large group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, do something unusual for a brief period of time, then quickly disperse. Image File history File linksMetadata Wikipillow. ... A pillow fight that took place in Lausanne, in front of the courthouse A downtown Toronto pillow fight flash mob. ... One definition of public space or a public place is a place where anyone has a right to come without paying an entrance or other fee. ...


News media and commentators have often misused the term "flash mob" to refer to nearly any form of public gathering.

Contents

Origins

The first flash mob

The first flash mob was organized in Manhattan in May 2003, by Bill Wasik, senior editor of Harper's Magazine. The origins of the flash mobs were unknown until Wasik published an article about his creation in the March 2006 edition of Harper's. The first attempt was unsuccessful after the targeted retail store was tipped off about the plan for people to gather.[1] The first successful flash mob assembled in June 3, 2003 at Macy's department store. Wasik avoided such problems during the second flash mob by sending participants to preliminary staging areas—in four prearranged Manhattan bars—where they received further instructions about the ultimate event and location just before the event began.[2] For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... “Harpers” redirects here. ... is the 154th day of the year (155th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the R.H. Macy & Co. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ...


More than one hundred people converged upon the ninth floor rug department of Macy's department store, gathering around one particular very expensive rug. Anyone approached by a sales assistant was advised to say that the gatherers lived together in a warehouse on the outskirts of New York, that they were shopping for a Love Rug, and that they made all their purchase decisions as a group. Following this flash mob, about 200 people flooded the lobby and mezzanine of the Hyatt hotel in synchronized applause for about fifteen seconds, and next a shoe boutique in SoHo was invaded by participants pretending to be tourists on a bus trip. This article is about the state. ... Looking up inside the 32-story atrium of the Shanghai Grand Hyatt, part of the Jin Mao Building. ... Cast-iron architecture in Greene Street SoHo is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ...


In the article Wasik claimed that he created flash mobs as a social experiment designed to poke fun at hipsters, and highlight the cultural atmosphere of conformity and of wanting to be an insider or part of "the next big thing." A hipster is a subcultural identification, usually applied to middle-class, and upper-class younger people of North America and Europe. ...


Precursors

Flash mobs bear certain similarities to political demonstrations, although flash mobs were originally intended to be specifically apolitical. Flash mobs can be seen as a specialized form of smart mob, which is a term and concept forwarded by author Howard Rheingold in his 2002 book Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution. A demonstration is the public display of the common opinion of a activist group, often economically, political, or socially, by gathering in a crowd, usually at a symbolic place or date, associated with that opinion. ... A smart mob is a form of self-structuring social organization through technology-mediated, intelligent emergent behavior. The concept was introduced by Howard Rheingold in his book Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution. ... Howard Rheingold at the Ars Electronica in 2004 Howard Rheingold (born July 7, 1947) is a leading thinker and writer on the cultural, social and political implications of modern communications media such as the Internet, mobile telephony and virtual communities (a term he is credited with inventing). ...


The term flash mob is claimed to have been inspired by both “smart mob” and “flash crowd.”[3] Flash Crowd was a 1973 short story by science fiction author Larry Niven, one of a series about the consequences of instantaneous, practically free transfer booths that could take one anywhere on Earth in milliseconds. ...


Literary precedents

In 1973, the story Flash Crowd by Larry Niven described a concept vaguely similar to flash mobs. It described how, with the invention of popular teleportation, an argument at a shopping mall, which happened to be covered by a news crew, swells into a riot. The broadcast coverage attracted the attention of other people, who use the widely available technology of the teleportation booth to swarm first that event — thus intensifying the riot — and then other events as they happened. In actuality, flash crowds are used to start up and heighten riots. When a riot begins and is televised, others join in, resulting in the participation of millions of people. Commenting on the social impact of such mobs, one character in Niven's story, articulating the police view, says, "We call them flash crowds, and we watch for them." The first recorded use of the now more familiar term "flash mob", was in 2003, and featured in a blog entry posted in the aftermath of Wasik's event.[4][3] Flash Crowd was a 1973 short story by science fiction author Larry Niven, one of a series about the consequences of instantaneous, practically free transfer booths that could take one anywhere on Earth in milliseconds. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Teleportation is the movement of objects or elementary particles from one place to another, more or less instantaneously, without traveling through space. ...


The 1998 novel Distraction by Bruce Sterling also features a riot by a flash mob in its opening pages, although the term is not used, and the flash mob riot is only a very peripheral element of the plot. Michael Bruce Sterling (born April 14, 1954) is an American science fiction author, best known for his novels and his seminal work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which defined the cyberpunk genre. ...


Use of the term

Webster's New Millennium Dictionary of English defines flash mob as “a group of people who organize on the Internet and then quickly assemble in a public place, do something bizarre, and disperse.”[5] This definition is consistent with the original use of the term; however, both news media and promoters have subsequently and incorrectly used the term to refer to any form of smart mob, including:

  • Political protests[7]
  • Collaborative bargaining techniques being practiced in China[10]
  • Promotional appearances by a pop musician[11]

The Silent Disco is a clubbing concept where dancers are provided with personal wireless headphones which can be tuned in to listen to a DJ. This type of disco earned its name because of the fact that an outsider walking in would see a tent full of people dancing, yet... Victoria station in London is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A denial-of-service attack (also, DoS attack) is an attack on a computer system or network that causes a loss of service to users, typically the loss of network connectivity and services by consuming the bandwidth of the victim network or overloading the computational resources of the victim system. ... A supercomputer is a device for turning compute-bound problems into I/O-bound problems. ...

1800s usage

In 1800s Tasmania, the term "flash mob" was used to describe a subculture consisting of female prisoners, based on the term "flash language" for the jargon that these women used. The 1800s Australian term "flash mob" referred to a segment of society, not an event, and showed no other similarities to the modern term "flash mob" or the events it describes.[citation needed] Slogan or Nickname: The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $16,114...


Usage and effects of flash mobs

Flash mobs started as pointless stunts, but the concept has already developed for the benefit of political and social agendas. Flash mobbing utilises the efficiency of communicating information on websites and by email, and protesters can similarly use the "on and off" concept to swarm political events. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... For other uses, see Society (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... E-mail, or email, is short for electronic mail and is a method of composing, sending, and receiving messages over electronic communication systems. ...


Other notable flash mobs

China

Flash mob activity occurred in the capital Beijing and the government seems to tolerate it when there is no clear breach of the law involved.[12] “Peking” redirects here. ...


In April 2004 thousands of people took to Shanghai's streets, motivated by mass SMS. Nationalistically-themed messages including "Show your patriotism! Support China!! Protest against the lies of Japan!" were sent. Many emphasised peaceful behaviour. Police ensured that the protest, one of very few officially sanctioned in China in recent years, was orderly and arranged for bus transport to disperse protestors after a few Japanese cars and the windows at the Japanese embassy were attacked. The protests involved Japanese refusal to acknowledge alleged wrongs done to China by Japan during WWII.[citation needed]


Romania

In December 2004, in Bucharest, Romania, in front of the National Television building, approximately 70 people stuck duct tape on their mouths and performed a jogging session without leaving their places. It was a flash mob that many referred to as "Shut Your Mouth And Play Those Ankles," a Romanian saying which means "do as you are told, do not comment." The statement criticized limits to freedom of speech placed upon journalists on Televiziunea Română, the Romanian National Television. In conjunction with other events, this flash-mob prompted changes in the board of the National Television.[citation needed] Nickname: Motto: Patria si Dreptul Meu (My Country and My Right) Location of Bucharest within Romania (in red) Coordinates: , Country County Founded 1459 (first official mentioned) Government  - Mayor Adriean Videanu Area  - City 228 km²  (88 sq mi)  - Metro 238 km² (91. ... A piece of transparent duct tape, left, and of silver duct tape, right. ... Televiziunea Română (pronunciation: télévizju:nèa ro:mÄ«nÉ™), more commonly referred to as TVR (pronunciation: tévéré) is the national state-owned public service television broadcaster of Romania. ...


United Kingdom

The world's largest reported flash mob occurred in the United Kingdom on 30 November 2006 at Paddington station.[13] More than 3,500 people were in attendance, a record number that has yet to be surpassed. is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paddington Station, March 2005 during rush hour Paddington station or London Paddington station is a major National Rail and London Underground station complex in the Paddington area of London. ...


See also

For other uses of critical mass, see critical mass (disambiguation). ... Flash Crowd was a 1973 short story by science fiction author Larry Niven, one of a series about the consequences of instantaneous, practically free transfer booths that could take one anywhere on Earth in milliseconds. ... A flash mob computing (also flash mob computer) is a temporary ad-hoc computer cluster running specific software to coordinate the individual computers into one single supercomputer. ... A pillow fight that took place in Lausanne, in front of the courthouse A downtown Toronto pillow fight flash mob. ... Mobile clubbing is a form of flash mob where people gather and dance to music playing in their headphones from their own portable music player in a public space. ... A smart mob is a form of self-structuring social organization through technology-mediated, intelligent emergent behavior. The concept was introduced by Howard Rheingold in his book Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution. ... A subway party that took place in Toronto A subway party is a celebration that occurs on a mass transit system. ... The York Naked Bike Ride passing in front of York Minster in June 2006 World Naked Bike Ride (WNBR) is an international event in which participants plan, meet and ride together en masse on human-powered transport (the vast majority on bicycles, and fewer on skateboards, roller blades, roller skates... A participant in a zombie walk in Calgary. ...

References

  1. ^ Goldstein, Lauren (2003-08-10). "The Mob Rules". Time Europe (18 April 2003 issue) 162 (7). ISSN 0040-781X. OCLC 1767509. Retrieved on 2007-03-14. 
  2. ^ Wasik, Bill (March 2006). "My Crowd, or, Phase 5: A report from the inventor of the flash mob" (Subscription). Harper's Magazine: pp. 56-66. ISSN 0017-789X. OCLC 4532730. Retrieved on 2007-02-02. 
  3. ^ a b McFedries, Paul (2003-07-14). flash mob. WordSpy.com. Logophilia Limited. Retrieved on 2006-03-14.
  4. ^ Savage, Sean (2003-06-16). Flash Mobs Take Manhattan. cheesebikini. Retrieved on 2007-03-14.
  5. ^ "flash mob". Webster's New Millennium™ Dictionary of English, Preview Edition (v 0.9.6). Retrieved on 2007-04-27. 
  6. ^ Stewart, Tim. "4,000 flash mob dancers startle commuters at Victoria", Evening Standard, 2007-04-05. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  7. ^ "Putin protest by flash mob", BBC News, 2004-02-28. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  8. ^ Musil, Steven. "This week in Web threats: The Internet is always good for a little fear and loathing", CNET News, CNET, 2005-02-11. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  9. ^ Biever, Celeste. "A Flash mob to attempt supercomputing feat", New Scientist, 2004-03-29. ISSN 0262-4079 OCLC 2378350. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  10. ^ Finin, Tim (2006-07-05). Flash mob shopping in China. UMBC eBiquity Blog. UMBC Ebiquity Research Group. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  11. ^ Gardner, Elysa. "Avril Lavigne, in the flesh, at 'flash mob' appearances", USA Today, 2004-02-27. Retrieved on 2007-05-03. 
  12. ^ "Flashmob" of 12 Proposed to One Girl in Beijing. CRIEnglish.com (2006-09-03). Retrieved on 2007-05-03. This is a typical media report.
  13. ^ The biggest flash mob ever. Associated Newspapers Ltd (December 1, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-05-26.]

Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Harpers” redirects here. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul McFedries (born 23 August 1959) is an American author of more than 40 computer books that have sold 3 million copies worldwide. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNET Networks, Inc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... New Scientist is a weekly international science magazine covering recent developments in science and technology for a general English-speaking audience. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tim Finin (born 1949, Walworth, Wisconsin) is a Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - Flash mob (918 words)
Following this flash mob, about 200 people flooded the lobby and mezzanine of the Hyatt hotel in synchronized applause for about 15 seconds, and next a shoe boutique in Soho was invaded by participants pretending to be tourists on a bus trip.
Flash mobs started as pointless stunts, but the concept has already developed for the benefit of political and social agendas.
Flash mob computing is a temporary supercomputer made when a large group of people get together and tie computers together for a single purpose or event.
SocioSite: PECULIARITIES OF CYBERSPACE: FLASH MOBS (4732 words)
A flash mob is a group of people who are mobilized via the internet and other electronic media to come together somewhere at a certain time for a short period of time in order to do something absurdist or provocative.
Also in the Dutch mobbing environment repeatedly proposals are made to organize 'charitable' or 'social' flash mobs that clean streets with a broom for 5 minutes in an underprivileged area or in a neglected park.
Without long, flash mobs will be included in the action repertoire of social movements, of political parties that want to mobilize their supporters in election campaigns, and of companies that want to sell their products and services to customers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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