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Encyclopedia > Flash (Barry Allen)
Flash


The Silver Age Flash, Barry Allen.
Art by Barry Kitson. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Barry Kitson is an artist best known as a Penciler of major superhero comicbooks published by Marvel and DC. His first professional work was Spider-Man for Marvel UK. He also drew the first 2000AD Judge Dredd comicbook written by Grant Morrison. ...

Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956)
Created by Gardner Fox
Bob Kanigher
Carmine Infantino
Characteristics
Alter ego Bartholomew Henry "Barry" Allen (note: At one time it was said to be Barrace)
Team
affiliations
Justice League
Notable aliases Trans-Visible Man
Abilities Super speed, complete self-molecular control, time travel.

Barry Allen is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the second Flash. He first appeared in Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956), created by writers Gardner Fox and Bob Kanigher and penciler Carmine Infantino. DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... In comic books, the term first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Showcase has been the title of several anthology series published by DC Comics. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... In producing a comic book, the penciller (or penciler) draws the comic based on the script created by the writer. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ...

Contents

Fictional character biography

Barry Allen is a police scientist with a reputation for being very slow, deliberate, and frequently late, which frustrates his fiancee, Iris West. One night, as he is preparing to leave work, a lightning bolt shatters a case full of chemicals and spills them all over Allen. As a result, Allen finds that he can run extremely fast and has matching reflexes. He dons a set of red tights sporting a lightning bolt, dubs himself the Flash (after his childhood hero in the comic books, Jay Garrick), and becomes a crimefighter of Central City. In his civilian identity, he stores the costume in his ring, which can eject the compressed clothing when Allen needs it and suck it back in with the aid of a special gas that shrinks the suit. In addition, Allen invented the cosmic treadmill, a device that allowed for precise time-travel and was used in many stories. Allen was so well liked that nearly all speedsters that come after him are constantly compared to him. Batman once said "Barry is the kind of man that I would've hoped to become if my parents hadn't been murdered" Iris West Allen is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ... Unsolved problems in physics: Is time travel theoretically and practically possible? If so, how can paradoxes such as the grandfather paradox be avoided? Time travel is the concept of moving backwards and/or forwards to different points in time, in a manner analogous to moving through space. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


Justice League

As presented in Justice League of America #9, when the Earth is infiltrated by alien warriors sent to conquer the planet, some of the world's greatest heroes join forces -- Allen is one of them. While the superheroes individually defeat most of the invaders, they fall prey to a single alien and only by working together are they able to defeat the warrior. Afterwards the heroes decide to found the Justice League of America. “Green people” redirects here. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ...


During the years, he is depicted as feeling attracted to Black Canary and Zatanna, but he never pursues a relationship because he feels his real love is Iris West. Allen also becomes good friends with Green Lantern (Hal Jordan), which would later be the subject of the limited series Flash and Green Lantern: The Brave and the Bold. Black Canary is a fictional character, a DC Comics superheroine. ... Zatanna Zatara is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Hal Jordan is a fictional character, a DC Comics superhero. ...


In Flash # 123 – "Flash of Two Worlds," – Allen is transported to Earth-Two where he meets Jay Garrick, the original Flash in DC Continuity; it is revealed that Jay Garrick's adventures were captured in comic book form on Earth-One. This storyline initiated DC's multiverse and was continued in issues of Flash and in team-ups between the Justice League of America of Earth-One and the Justice Society of America of Earth-Two. In the classic story from Flash # 179 – "The Flash - Fact or Fiction?" – Allen is thrown into the universe eventually called Earth Prime, a representation of "our" universe, where he seeks the aid of the Flash comic book's editor Julius Schwartz to build a cosmic treadmill so that he can return home. The much-homaged cover of The Flash #123 Flash of Two Worlds! is a landmark [1] comic book story that was published in The Flash #123 (Sept. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... In DC Comics, the Multiverse was a continuity construct in which multiple fictional versions of the universe existed in the same space, separated from each other by their vibrational resonances. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... In DC Comics, the Multiverse was a continuity construct in which multiple fictional versions of the universe existed in the same space, separated from each other by their vibrational resonances. ... The Justice Society of America, or JSA, is a DC Comics superhero group, the first team of superheroes in comic book history. ... A depiction of several alternate Earths within the Multiverse and the different variations of the Flash inhabiting each Earth. ... Earth Prime (or Earth-Prime) is a term sometimes used in works of speculative fiction involving parallel universes or a multiverse, and refers either to the universe containing our Earth, or to a parallel world with a bare minimum of divergence points from Earth as we know it. ... Julius Julie Schwartz (June 19, 1915 – February 8, 2004) was a comic book and pulp magazine editor, and a science fiction agent and prominent fan. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ...

Showcase #4 (Oct. 1956): First appearance of the Silver Age Flash. Art by Carmine Infantino and Joe Kubert.

Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Showcase 4 This image is a book cover. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Joe Kubert (born September 18, 1926, Poland) is an American comic book artist who went on to found the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art. ...

Tragedy

In time, he married his girlfriend Iris, who learned of his double identity because Allen talked in his sleep. She kept his secret, and eventually, he revealed his identity to her of his own free will. Iris was eventually revealed to have been sent as a child from the 30th century and adopted.


In the 1980s, Flash's life begins to collapse. Iris is murdered by Professor Zoom (who had long loved her and been jealous of Allen), and when Allen prepares to marry another woman, Zoom tries the same trick again. Allen stops him, killing Zoom in the process by breaking his neck. Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ...


Put on trial for Zoom's murder, Allen is eventually acquitted, and learns that Iris's spirit has in fact been taken to the 30th century, where she is given a new body.


Crisis on Infinite Earths

Following the trial, Allen retires and joins Iris in the 30th century. However, after only a few weeks of happiness, the Crisis on Infinite Earths intervenes, and Allen is captured by the Anti-Monitor and brought to 1986; according to the Anti-Monitor, the Flash was the only being capable of travelling to other universes at will, so the Anti-Monitor couldn't allow him to stay free. Allen escapes and foils the Anti-Monitor's plan to destroy the Earth, but dies in the process. It has been said that Allen travels back through time and becomes the very same lightning bolt that gives him his powers, but later it is also strongly implied that the soul of Barry resides in the Speed Force, the mystical source and Valhalla open to all dead speedsters, and from which the living ones draw their amazing powers. After Allen's death, Wally West, his nephew and sidekick (known as Kid Flash), takes up the mantle of the Flash. Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... The Anti-Monitor is a fictional comic book supervillain, the antagonist of the 1985 DC Comics miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ...


After death

Marv Wolfman, scribe for the Crisis on Infinite Earths, has repeatedly stated (first hinted at in his introduction to the original Crisis collected edition hardcover), then fully explained on his website [1]) that he left a loophole in the script wherein the Barry Allen Flash could be re-introduced, without a retcon necessary, into DC Universe continuity. This loophole would have featured Barry being pulled out of time at some period during his desperate run to annihilate the anti-matter cannon, but, knowing that he would someday have to return to the time loop, he would become ever more determined to use his speed to help others, cramming everything that he could into the little time he had left before he would have to return and die to ensure the stability of the timeline. Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ...


It should also be noted that the way Barry Allen seemed to have "died" in Crisis on Infinite Earths, was that he ran so fast that he was able to stop the Anti-Monitor’s anti-matter cannon from firing by catching the tachyon beam at the heart of the weapon. After this act, according to Secret Origins Annual #2 (1988), Barry Allen turns into a lightning bolt, goes back in time, becoming the lightning bolt that hit his lab, splashing his past-self with chemicals and transforming him into the Flash. [2]


In Deadman: Dead Again, Barry is one of the heroes whose spirit Deadman helps to enter Heaven, and the Green Arrow storyline "Quiver" depicts Barry Allen in Heaven. His spirit, however, seems to still be alive within the speed force, along with Max and the rest of the speedsters. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ...


Legacy

Iris is pregnant when Allen dies, and she has two children, the Tornado Twins, who later meet the Legion of Super-Heroes. Each of her children themselves have children. One, Jenni Ognats, grows up to become the Legionnaire XS, while the other, Bart Allen, is born with a rapid-aging illness, and is sent back to the 20th century where he is cured by Wally West. He remains there as the superhero Impulse (later becoming the second Kid Flash and even later, the fourth Flash, until his death in "Flash the fastest man alive #13"). The Tornado Twins were fictional superheroes in the DC Comics Universe. ... LSH redirects here. ... XS (Jenni Ognats), is a fictional character, a superheroine in the future of the DC Comics universe. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Post-Crisis appearances

Due to his time-travel abilities, even death does not stop Barry from aiding his friends and family.


Barry first reappears during the Chain Lightning arc, where Flashes from different eras join together to defeat Cobalt Blue. Previously, a man that was thought to be Barry Allen, was revealed to be a past version of Professor Zoom, the Reverse Flash, who had been driven mad on a visit to the past and believed himself to be Barry Allen. Cobalt Blue is Barry Allen's twin brother, who had been given to another couple at birth due to a mistake at the hospital. The resulting battle takes place shortly before Barry Allen is kidnapped during the Crisis on Infinite Earths. Barry is nearly killed in this battle, almost rewriting the outcome of the Crisis. Cobalt Blue is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy to the Flash. ... Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ...


When Wally West, wracked by grief for the loss of his unborn twins at the hands of Zoom, regrets the public knowledge of his identity, Barry comes from somewhere in time, counseling him, and talking the Spectre into granting his wish. He then disappears, telling his nephew that he will come to his aid three times, the three most difficult days of his life. In fact, when Zoom enlists the aid of Professor Zoom to make Wally relive the loss of his beloved twins, Barry is already there, trying to stop his own Reverse Flash. For the second time, he helps Wally to undo the damage dealt by Zoom, also allowing Wally to save his twins, and then he returns to his proper timeline. Zoom (real name Hunter Zolomon) is a comic book supervillain in the DC Universe. ... The Spectre is a fictional cosmic entity and superhero who has appeared in numerous comic books published by DC Comics. ... Professor Zoom is a comic book super-villain in the DC Universe. ... Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ...


Infinite Crisis

Main article: Infinite Crisis

In the fourth issue of Infinite Crisis, Barry Allen's soul comes out from the Speed Force, along with Johnny Quick and Max Mercury, to help his grandson Bart to deal with Superboy Prime, taking the villainous lad with him in the Speed Force. Bart Allen appears wearing Barry Allen's costume in Tokyo near the end of Infinite Crisis #5 to tell the heroes that Superboy Prime has escaped the Speed Force. Bart again reappears in Infinite Crisis #7 in Barry Allen's costume to combat Superboy Prime once more. In Flash: The Fastest Man Alive #6 (2006) (taken place shortly before Infinite Crisis #5) is told how Barry spent four years in an alternate Keystone City along with Max Mercury, Johnny Quick and an alternate Jay Garrick, until he met Bart and Wally West, joining him after the battle against Superboy-Prime. After Superboy escapes, Barry suggests that someone of the still living speedsters has to absorb the whole Speed Force and cross the dimensional bridge back to Post-Crisis Earth. As Bart volunteers, Barry gives him his suit as a last gift, to keep the Force contained, and stays behind. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... Johnny Quick is the name of two DC Comics characters, each with the power of superhuman speed. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Superboy-Prime is a fictional character, a superhero turned supervillain in the DC Universe. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Powers and abilities

Barry Allen was believed to be the fastest of all known Flashes, capable of running at the speed of light with little difficulty. In Flash #150, "straining every muscle," he ran at ten times the speed of light. However, when he pushed himself further (during the Crisis on Infinite Earths) he appeared to waste away as he was converted into pure energy, travelled back in time, and was revealed to be the very bolt of lightning that gave him his powers. Barry Allen possessed abilities that Jay Garrick and Wally West have not always been able to duplicate, most notably the ability to "vibrate" in such a way as to pass through solid matter (similar to the 'phasing' power of Kitty Pryde). Allen regularly engaged in time travel using the Cosmic Treadmill device. Katherine Kitty Pryde, also commonly known by the codename Shadowcat, is a Marvel Comics mutant superhero and a member of the X-Men. ...


Rogues gallery

Main article: Rogues (comics)

The Flash acquired a colorful rogues gallery of villains. These criminals typically had unusually modest goals for their power level (robbery or other petty crimes), and each adopted a specific theme in his or her equipment and methods. Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ...


Trade paperback and Hardcover collection

Collected editions that reprint issues of The Flash (vol. 1) and other comics featuring Barry Allen. The Archives are hardcover, all the others are softcover trade paperbacks:

Title Material collected
Original
The Flash Archives Vol. 1 HC Showcase #4, 8, 13-14
The Flash (vol. 2) #104-108
The Flash Archives Vol. 2 HC The Flash (vol. 2) #109-116
The Flash Archives Vol. 3 HC The Flash (vol. 2) #117-124
The Flash Archives Vol. 4 HC The Flash (vol. 2) #125-132
Showcase Presents: The Flash Vol. 1 TPB Flash Comics #104
Showcase #4, #8, #13, #14
The Flash (vol. 1) #105-119
The Greatest Flash Stories Ever Told HC (1990) and TPB (1991) Flash Comics #1, 66, 86
Comic Cavalcade #24
Showcase #4
The Flash (vol. 1) #107, 113, 119, 124, 125, 137, 143, 148, 179
Five-Star Super-Hero Spectacular
The Flash (vol. 2) #2
The Flash: The Greatest Stories Ever Told TPB (2007) Flash Comics #86, 104
The Flash (vol. 1) #123, 155, 165, 179
The Flash (vol. 2) #91
DC Special Series #11

Other versions

  • Barry Allen guest-stars in Frank Miller's Batman: The Dark Knight Strikes Again. He's been kept by Lex Luthor as a power source for most of the East Coast, constantly running on a treadmill to provide cheap electrical power or Iris will be executed. After being rescued, Barry wears a black version of his original Flash costume and aids Batman and other heroes in restoring order.
"Buried Alien"
  • Barry Allen also stars in JLA: Age of Wonder as a scientist working with Superman and a consortium of early twentieth-century scientists such as Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. The uniform incorporates the silver age look with the Mercury-style helmet worn by Jay Garrick.
  • Other Elseworld appearances include: League of Justice, a Lord of the Rings-type story, where the character is re-cast as "Phaeton," who wears a mystical brooch resembling Flash's lightning-bolt chest emblem, and has bathed in dragon's blood in order to protect himself from speed friction; and Batman: Holy Terror, where he is one of a number of metahumans imprisoned by a theocratic state, and is killed when his captor deactivates the aura that protects him from friction.
  • A story in the Marvel comic book series Quasar has the Marvel universe speedsters facing off in a competition set up by a being called the Runner. The contest is a race from the Earth to the Moon. During the race, a surge of energy hits the track, leaving a being with blonde hair and dressed in the remains of a red outfit with yellow boots. This being has no memory, but an enormous desire to run. He goes on to win the race, passing Marvel speedsters such as Quicksilver and Speed Demon in the process. When asked what his name is, the man replies, "I don't know... Buried Alien, or something like that." When asked how it felt to be the fastest man alive, he replied, "It feels... right!" The racer goes on to take the name Fast-Forward, disappearing into the universe in an attempt to help Makkari, who is stuck at hyper speed.
  • In the Elseworlds tale Superman & Batman: Generations, Barry's life is still the same, but heroes aged in real time. However, this reality shows no sign of the Crisis ever happening, so Barry is seen to be alive and well in 2008.
  • The Elseworlds story Flashpoint shows an alternate reality where Barry Allen became the Flash in 1956, the year he first appeared in comics. He was more involved in government affairs. By 1963, he had ended the Cold War and pushed the communists out of Vietnam. However, his career was cut short as he took a bullet aimed at John F. Kennedy. He was paralyzed from the neck down, but he still had the fastest mind on Earth and formed Allen Industries. By 1988, he and Vandal Savage's Immortality, Inc. had begun an exploration of Mars. In 1998, Wally West led an expedition to Mars, during which he found the flashpoint, an object which killed all life on Mars. Savage revaled his true colors as the one who shot Allen and Barry made contact with Wally, who was going on a super speed rampage. Barry was cured and defeated Savage. He then entered the flashpoint, going into a Speed Force.
  • In The Flash Annual #7, an alternate universe is shown where shortly after Wally West became Kid Flash, he became a superstar celebrity. However, Barry was tragically killed while battling Captain Cold. Ten years later, Wally is now a parapeligic and Captain Cold has written a "true" story about Barry. Wally decides to make a movie about his mentor that is true. The resulting film is a success.
  • In Amalgam Comics, Barry Allen is combined with Johnny Blaze to form Speed Demon.

Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist and film director best known for his film noir-style comic book stories. ... The Dark Knight Strikes Again is a Batman graphic novel by Frank Miller. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Image File history File links Quasar1. ... Image File history File links Quasar1. ... “Edison” redirects here. ... Nikola Tesla (1856-1943)[1] was a world-renowned Serbian inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer and electrical engineer. ... This article is about the novel. ... Metahuman is a term to describe superhumans in the DC Universe. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ... This article is about the comic book company. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Runner is fictional character that appeared in publications from Marvel Comics. ... For Quicksilver (DC Comics), see Max Mercury. ... For the Amalgam Comics character, see Speed Demon (comics). ... Makkari is a member of the Eternals, a fictional race in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kid Flash (Iris West) is a superheroine in an alternate future of the DC Comics universe. ... Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... For other uses of John Byrne, see John Byrne (disambiguation). ... Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article is about communism as a form of society, as an ideology advocating that form of society, and as a popular movement. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Vandal Savage is a fictional character and supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... The Flash. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... Johnny Blaze, or John Blaze, is a fictional, supernatural superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ...

Other media

  • He had some adventures in the rotating series of superheroes cartoons included in The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure, with Kid Flash. He also was a founding member of The Justice League of America along with Superman, Green Lantern, Hawkman, and The Atom.
  • He also appeared in Super Friends to help fellow Justice Leaguer, Superman. JLA members Flash, Green Lantern, and Hawkman eventually joined forces with Superman and the rest of the SuperFriends in Challenge Of The SuperFriends, Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show, The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians he was an important member of the superteam.
  • Barry Allen was the Flash in the 1990s Flash live-action TV series, although this character incorporated elements of Wally's personality and social life, as well as previously non-existent characters such as a brother and nephew. He was played by John Wesley Shipp.
  • Barry Allen never officially apperas in the DCAU series of animated projects by Bruce Timm and Paul Dini. However, in the Justice League Unlimited episode "Flash and Substance," the Wally West Flash mentions his uncle "flying in" to attend the dedication of a Flash Museum, an obvious reference to Barry. There's also another character on the same episode, who is Wally's teacher at the forecsic lab, bears strange resemblance to Barry himself.
  • He made a cameo appearance in The Joining, Part Two, the Season 4 finale of The Batman. He also will appear in the Season 5 episode "A Mirror Darkly", voiced by Charlie Schlatter, who also voiced Wally West in Superman: The Animated Series.
  • In season 4, episode 5 of Smallville, entitled "Run", featured speedster Bart Allen. He is portrayed as a self-centered teenager who uses his powers for personal gain, (including the Flash logo on his rucksack) although by the end of the episode, he was showing signs of changing his ways. Bart also carries around identification of Jay Garrick, Barry Allen, and Wally West, three Flashes in the main DC Universe. In season 6, episode 11 (Justice) he is working with Green Arrow, Cyborg and Aquaman to bring down Lex Luthor's plans of experimenting on "meteor freaks".
Kenny Johnston as Barry Allen in Justice League of America
  • Ballad of Barry Allen - A song by the band Jim's Big Ego on their album, "They're Everywhere". The song portrays Barry as a tragic character, whose perception of the world is so accelerated that all of reality appears to proceed at a snail's pace, causing him to gradually slip into depression. The band's frontman, Jim Infantino is the nephew of Flash co-creator Carmine Infantino, who provided the cover art for the same album.
  • In the movie Catch Me If You Can, Frank Abagnale, Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio) uses the name Barry Allen from The Flash comic book as one of his aliases in the film. The fact that he uses the name of a comic book character leads Carl Hanratty (Tom Hanks) to believe that Abagnale is much younger than he had previously thought. He also had some Flash comic books in his room when his father woke him up to get the suit.
  • Barry Allen stars in the 1997 live-action TV pilot Justice League of America. He is played by Kenny Johnston. The pilot never aired in the US, but did in other countries.
  • In the movie Daddy Day Care, a child named Tony is almost always dressed as the Flash, and is shown speeding everywhere, out of reach of the daycare workers.
  • Allen is slated to appear in the animated adaptation of Justice League: The New Frontier. He will be voiced by Neil Patrick Harris.

Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Title card from The New Adventures of Superman Title card from Aquaman The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure was a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For the DJ, see DJ Green Lantern. ... For other meanings of the term, see Hawkman (disambiguation) Hawkman is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... Super Friends is an animated series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1973 to 1985. ... Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... John Wesley Shipp (born January 22, 1955 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor best known as Mitch Leery, the title characters father on the television drama Dawsons Creek from 1998 to 2002 and for roles in several daytime soap operas. ... Bruce Walter Timm (born on February 8, 1961) is an American character designer, animator and producer. ... Paul Dini is an American television producer of animated cartoons. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... List of Justice League episodes Flash and Substance is the fifth episode of the second season of the Justice League Unlimited TV series. ... Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... The Joining, Part Two is the fifty second episode of the television series The Batman. ... The Batman is an American animated television series produced by Warner Bros. ... Charles Schlatter (born May 1, 1966 in Englewood, New Jersey) is an American actor. ... Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this comics-related article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Cyborg (disambiguation). ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Jims Big Ego is a Boston, Massachusetts-based band formed in 1995 under the leadership of singer/songwriter Jim Infantino. ... Jim Infantino is an American singer/songwriter and leader of the band Jims Big Ego, as well as being a graphic designer, poet and stalwart of the Boston folk scene. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Leonardo Wilhelm DiCaprio (born November 11 1974[1]) is a three-time Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor who garnered world wide fame for his role as Jack Dawson in Titanic. ... Thomas Jeffrey Hanks (born July 9, 1956) is an American two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, Emmy-winning director, voice-over artist and movie producer. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by human actors, as opposed to animation. ... Justice League of America is an unsuccessful TV-pilot based on the characters of The Justice League. ... Daddy Day Care is a 2003 comedy film, starring Eddie Murphy. ... Neil Patrick Harris (born June 15, 1973) is an Emmy-nominated American actor. ... The Flash is a name shared by several DC Comics superheroes. ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ... Harry Lampert seen at Motor City Comic-Con 2002 Harry Lampert (November 3, 1916 in New York - November 13, 2004 in Boca Raton, Florida) was a cartoonist and author. ... Robert Kanigher (June 18, 1915 - May 6, 2002) was a prolific comic book writer whose career spanned five decades. ... Cover for Spider-Woman #8 (November 1978). ... John Broome (aka: pen names John Osgood and Edgar Ray Meritt) was a writer-contributor to DC Comics. ... Mark Waid (born March 21, 1962 in Hueytown, Alabama) is an American comic book writer. ... Michael Lance Mike Wieringo (June 24, 1963–August 12, 2007)[1] was an American comic book artist best known for his work on DC Comics The Flash and Marvel Comics Fantastic Four. ... Jay Garrick is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe and the first to use the name Flash. ... Wally West is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe, the first Kid Flash and the third Flash. ... Bartholomew Bart Allen II is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jesse Chambers is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Iris West Allen is a fictional character who appears in DC Comics. ... Linda Park (also Linda Park-West) is a fictional character in the DC Universe. ... Max Mercury is the name of a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... Johnny Quick is the name of a Golden Age DC Comics character with the power of superhuman speed. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of The Flash. ... Abra Kadabra is a DC Comics supervillain and a primary foe of the Flash. ... The Black Flash is a fictional comic book character from DC Comics. ... Captain Cold, also known as Leonard Snart, is a comic book villain created by John Broome and Carmine Infantino for The Flash comic book, and is one of the scarlet speedsters enemies. ... George Digger Harkness and his son Owen Mercer, both known as Captain Boomerang, are fictional characters in the DC Universe. ... Cobalt Blue is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy to the Flash. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ... Heat Wave is a fictional villain in the DC Universe and a primary foe of the Flash. ... Inertia is a comic book character in the DC Comics universe. ... Manfred Mota is a DC Comics villain and adversary to The Flash. ... Mirror Master is a fictional character, a recurring foe of the Flash with large technical knowledge and skills involving the use of mirrors. ... Pied Piper (real name: Hartley Rathaway) is a fictional former supervillain in the DC Comics universe. ... Reverse Flash is a title that has been taken by three supervillains in DC Comics. ... The Top was a DC Comics supervillain and one of the earliest rogues of The Flashs (Barry Allen). ... The Trickster is the name of two DC Comics supervillains and an enemy of the Flash. ... Weather Wizard is the name of a fictional DC Comics supervillain. ... Some members of the Flashs Rogues Gallery. ... Central City is a fictional city that appears in stories published by DC Comics, and is the home of the Silver Age version of the Flash, Barry Allen. ... Keystone City is a fictional city featured in stories of the Flash published by DC Comics. ... The Flash Museum is a museum that appears in stories published by DC Comics. ... Bart Allen surrounded By the Speed Force after absorbing it. ... The much-homaged cover of The Flash #123 Flash of Two Worlds! is a landmark [1] comic book story that was published in The Flash #123 (Sept. ... Throughout his 60 year history, the Flash has appeared in numerous media. ... The Flash was a live action CBS television series from 1990-1991 that starred John Wesley Shipp as the superhero, The Flash, and co-starred Amanda Pays. ... The Flash is an video game based on the Comic book hero created by DC Comics. ... In DC Comics publications, the cosmic treadmill is a time travel device that was invented by Barry Allen, the second Flash. ...

External links

Notes and references


  Results from FactBites:
 
Flash (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4236 words)
The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing "super-speed", nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster.
Garrick, Allen and West are the best-known exemplars of the identity.
Barry Allen was a police scientist in 1956 with a reputation for being very slow, deliberate, and frequently late, which frustrated his fiancee, Iris West.
The Unofficial Flash Biography (2220 words)
Barry was always one step behind the rest of the world, that altered one night while working late at his laboratory when a bolt of lightning from the future struck the window.
Barry was foremost a scientist and with his analytical mind he was able to create a special resilient fabric that when exposed to nitrogen in the air expanded to normal size.
Barry's fame continued to rise and one night he found himself standing in for the entertainment at a charity event and started to show the children one particularly impressive stunt that involved vibrating his body at a certain frequency.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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