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Encyclopedia > Flannan Isles
Flannan Isles
Location
OS grid reference: NA725469
Names
Gaelic name: na h-Eileanan Flannach
Norse name: Unknown
Meaning of name: Flannan Isles
Area and Summit
Area: 50 ha over more than a dozen islands
Area rank (Scottish islands): 0
Highest elevation: 88 m on Eilean Mòr
Population
Population (2001): 0
Main settlement: Flannan Isles Lighthouse is the only habitable structure
Groupings
Island Group: Lewis with Harris
Local Authority: Na h-Eileanan Siar
Scotland
References: [1][2]

The Flannan Isles (Scottish Gaelic: na h-Eileanan Flannach) are a small island group in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, lying approximately 32 kilometres (20 miles) west of the Isle of Lewis. They may take their name from St Flannan, the 7th century Irish preacher and abbot.[3] The islands have been devoid of permanent residents since the automation of the lighthouse in 1971.[4] They are the location of an enduring mystery which occurred there in December 1900 when all three lighthouse keepers vanished without trace.[5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ... Lewis and Harris (Scottish Gaelic: Leodhas is na Hearadh) make up the largest island in the Outer Hebrides in Scotland. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Western Isles redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Lewis (disambiguation). ... Saint Flannan was an Irish saint who lived in the 7th century and was the son of a king of Thomond. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Eddystone Lighthouse, one of the first wavewashed lighthouses For other uses, see Lighthouse (disambiguation). ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...

Contents

Geography

The islands are split into three groups. The main cluster of rocks, which lie to the north-east, include the two principal islands of Eilean Mòr (English:Big Isle), and Eilean Taighe (House Isle). To the south lie Soray (Eastward Isle) and Sgeir Tomain, while the main western outcrops are Eilean a' Gobha (Isle of the Blacksmith), Roaireim (which has a natural rock arch) and Bròna Cleit (Sad Sunk Rock). The total land area amounts to approximately 50 hectares (124 acres) and the highest point is 88 metres (288 ft) above sea level on Eilean Mòr.[3]


The geology is comprised of a dark breccia of gabbros and dolerites intruding Archaen gneiss.[3] In pre-historic times the area was covered by ice sheets which spread from Scotland out into the Atlantic Ocean. After the last retreat of the ice circa 20,000 years BP, sea levels were up to 122 metres (400 feet) lower than at present and it is likely that the existing islands were part of a much larger land mass, although still separated from the Outer Hebrides by many miles of open water. Steadily rising sea levels would then have reduced the land remaining above sea level to its present extent.[6] Breccia, derived from the Latin word for broken, is a sedimentary rock composed of angular fragments in a matrix that may be of a similar or a different material. ... Gabbro Gabbro is a dark, coarse-grained, intrusive igneous rock chemically equivalent to basalt. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Diabase. ... Archaean redirects here. ... Gneiss Gneiss (IPA: ) is a common and widely distributed type of rock formed by high-grade regional metamorphic processes from preexisting formations that were originally either igneous or sedimentary rocks, which most commonly forms on ancient seabeds. ... Before Present (BP) years are the units of time (counted backwards to the past) used to report raw radiocarbon ages and dates referenced to the BP scale origin in the year AD 1950 (identical to 1950 CE). ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ...


There are two possible landing places to the east and west for yachts visiting Eilean Mòr, although this can be hazardous given the regular heavy swells.[3]


History

The lighthouse on Eilean Mòr. The Chapel of St Flannan can be seen on the slope to the right of the lighthouse.
The lighthouse on Eilean Mòr. The Chapel of St Flannan can be seen on the slope to the right of the lighthouse.

As the name implies, Eilean Taighe hosts a ruined stone shelter. Eilean Mòr is home to the lighthouse and a ruined chapel dedicated to St Flannan, which the lighthouse keepers referred to as the 'dog kennel' because of its small size. These ruined bothies were collectively described by the Ancient Monuments Commission as The Bothies of the Clan McPhail[7] or Bothain Chlann ‘ic Phaill.[8] It is not entirely clear which St. Flannan the chapel honours. It is likely that he was either the 7th century Abbot of Killaloe in County Clare or alternatively the half brother of the 8th century St Ronan who gave his name to the nearby island of North Rona. There was also a certain Flann, son of an Abbot of Iona called Maol-duine who died in 890, and who may have loaned his name to these isolated isles.[3] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Lairig Leacach Bothy, Lochaber, Scotland. ... Clan Chattan or the Chattan Confederation is a confederation of a number of Scottish clans who joined for mutual defence or blood bonds and is closely linked with Clan MacKintosh. ... Killaloe is a town in east County Clare, Republic of Ireland, situated in the midwest of Ireland. ... County Clare (Contae an Chláir in Irish) is in the Irish province of Munster. ... There are at least twelve saints called Saint Ronan. ... North Rona, often just called Rona, is a remote Scottish island in the North Atlantic. ... Iona is a small island, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland. ... Events The sovereignty of prince Svatopluk I in Bohemia is confirmed. ...


The archipelago is also known as 'The Seven Hunters', and in the Middle Ages they may also have been called the 'Seven Haley (Holy) Isles'.[9] Martin Martin (1703) lists a number of unusual customs associated with regular pilgrimages to Eilean Mòr such as removing one's hat and making a sunwise turn when reaching the plateau.[10] It is possible that the saint or his acolytes lived on Eilean Mòr and perhaps Eilean Taighe as well. However, it is unlikely that there were permanent residents on the islands once the Celtic Church fell into decline in the Hebrides (as a result of 9th century Viking invasions), until the construction of the lighthouse and its occupation very shortly before the dawn of the 20th century. The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... Martin Martin (?1699-1719) was a Scottish writer, he is best known for his work A Description of the Western Isles of Scotland (1695), particularly noted for its information on St Kilda. ... A clockwise motion is one that proceeds like the clocks hands: from the top to the right, then down and then to the left, and back to the top. ... Celtic Christianity is Christianity as it was first received and practiced by communities with Celtic backgrounds that observed certain practices divergent from those in the rest of Europe. ... This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ...


Wildlife

Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) in flight.
Northern Gannet (Morus bassanus) in flight.

The isles provide nesting for a population of seabirds, including Atlantic Puffins, Northern Fulmars, European Storm-petrels, Leach's Petrels, Common Shag and Black-legged Kittiwakes. There is a gannetry on Roaireim.[8] From the late Middle Ages on, Lewismen regularly raided these nests for eggs, birds and feathers. There is a population of Arctic Hares, brought to the islands by the lighthouse keepers,[6] and crofters from Bernera graze sheep on the most fertile islands.[3] Minke and Pilot Whales, as well as Risso's and other species of dolphin are commonly observed in the vicinity.[8] Image:Morus-bassanus Northern Gannet. ... Image:Morus-bassanus Northern Gannet. ... The Sooty Tern is highly aerial and marine and will spend years flying at sea without returning to land. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) The Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) is a seabird in the auk family. ... Species Fulmar (Linnaeus, 1761) Southern Fulmar (Smith,A, 1840) The two Fulmars are closely related seabirds occupying the same niche in different oceans. ... Binomial name Hydrobates pelagicus (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Storm-petrel or Storm Petrel (Hydrobates pelagicus) is a small bird of the storm-petrel family, Hydrobatidae, part of the seabird order Procellariiformes. ... Binomial name Oceanodroma leucorhoa (Vieillot, 1818) The Leachs Storm-petrel or Leachs Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) is a small seabird of the tubenose family. ... Binomial name Phalacrocorax aristotelis (Linnaeus, 1758) The Common Shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis) is a species of cormorant. ... Species Rissa tridactyla Rissa brevirostris The Kittiwakes (genus Rissa) are two closely related seabird species in the gull family Laridae. ... For other uses, see Gannet (disambiguation) Species Morus bassanus Morus capensis Morus serrator Synonyms Moris Gannets are seabirds in the family Sulidae, closely related to the boobies. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Binomial name Lepus timidus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mountain Hare (Lepus timidus) is a hare, which is largely adapted to polar and mountainous habitats. ... Great Bernera, often known just as Bernera (Scottish Gaelic: Bearnaraigh) is an island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... Binomial name Lacepede, 1804 Balaenoptera bonaerensis Burmeister, 1867 Minke Whale range Antarctic Minke Whale range Dwarf Minke Whale range The Minke Whale or Lesser Rorqual is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder of baleen whales. ... Binomial name Globicephala macrorhynchus Short-finned Pilot Whale range Binomial name Globicephala melas Long-finned Pilot Whale range A Pilot Whale is one of two species of cetacean in the genus Globicephala. ... Binomial name (G. Cuvier, 1812) Rissos Dolphin range The Rissos Dolphin (Grampus griseus) is the only species of dolphin in the genus Grampus. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ...


The islands became a Site of Special Scientific Interest in December 1983.[11] A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ...


Lighthouse

Designed by David Alan Stevenson, the 23 metre (75 foot) tower was constructed for the Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB) between 1895 and 1899 and is located near the highest point on Eilean Mòr. Construction was undertaken by George Lawson of Rutherglen at a cost of £6,914 inclusive of the building of the landing places, stairs, railway tracks etc. All of the materials used had to be hauled up the 45 metre (150 foot) cliffs directly from supply boats, no trivial task in the ever-churning Atlantic. A further £3,526 was spent on the shore station at Breasclete on the Isle of Lewis.[7] It was first lit on 7 December 1899, by 1925 it was one of the first Scottish lights to receive communications from the shore by wireless telegraphy[5] and then automated on 28 September 1971. A reinforced concrete helipad was constructed at the same time to enable maintenance visits in heavy weather. The light is produced by burning acetylene gas and has a range of 32 kilometres (20 miles). It is now monitored from the Butt of Lewis[4] and the shore station has been converted into flats.[12] Other than its relative isolation it would be a relatively unremarkable light were it not for the events which took place only just over a year after it was commissioned. David Alan Stevenson (born 1854, Edinburgh; died 1938) was a lighthouse engineer who built twenty six lighthouses in and around Scotland. ... Cape Wrath lighthouse The Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB), previously known as the Commissioners of Northern Light Houses, is the organisation responsible for marine navigation aids around the coastal areas of Scotland and the Isle of Man. ... Rutherglen (said: Rhu-ther-glehn) comes from the Gaelic An Ruadh Ghleann - the red valley. Rutherglen is a town located within the south-eastern suburbs of the city of Glasgow, Scotland near the town of Cambuslang. ... Breasclete or Brèascleit is a village on the west side of the Isle of Lewis, in Scotland. ... Wireless telegraphy is the practice of remote writing (see telegraphy) without the wires normally involved in an electrical telegraph. ... An Atlas Oryx helicopter touches down on a helipad onboard the High Speed Vessel Swift (HSV 2) ship. ... Acetylene (systematic name: ethyne) is a hydrocarbon belonging to the group of alkynes. ... The Butt of Lewisis in the area of Ness. ...


Mystery of 1900

Flannan Isles Lighthouse

Location Eilean Mòr
20 miles west of Lewis, Western Isles,
Scotland
Tower height 23 m (75 ft)
Characteristics Two White Flashes every 30 seconds
Description White circular tower
Date established 1899
Date of present tower 1899
Date automated 1971
Current use Active aid to navigation
Engineer David Stevenson
Open to the public Grounds only. Landings by sea may be difficult.

For other uses, see Lewis (disambiguation). ... The Western Isles are an archipelago in Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ...

Discovery

The first hint of anything untoward on the Flannan Isles came on 15 December 1900. The steamer Archtor on passage from Philadelphia to Leith passed the islands in poor weather and noted that the light was not operational. This was reported on arrival at Oban although no immediate action seems to have been taken. The island lighthouse was manned by a three man team, with a rotating fourth man spending time on shore. The relief vessel Hesperus was unable to set out on a routine visit from Lewis planned for 20 December due to adverse weather and did not arrive until noon on Boxing Day (26 December). On arrival the crew and relief keeper found that the flagstaff was bare of its flag, none of the usual provision boxes had been left on the landing stage for re-stocking and, more ominously, none of the lighthouse keepers were there to welcome them ashore. Jim Harvie, captain of the Hesperus, gave a strident blast on his whistle and set off a distress flare, but no reply was forthcoming. For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... The Water of Leith looking upriver from the docks, with the old buildings along Leith Shore including The Kings Wark and The Old Ship Hotel and Kings Landing. ... For other uses, see Oban (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lewis (disambiguation). ... Boxing Day is a public holiday observed in many Commonwealth countries on 26 December. ...


A boat was launched and Joseph Moore, the relief keeper, was put ashore alone. He found the entrance gate to the compound and main door both closed, the beds unmade and the clock stopped. Returning to the landing stage with this grim news he then went back up to the lighthouse with the Hesperus's second-mate and a seaman. A further search revealed that the lamps were cleaned and refilled. A set of oilskins were found, suggesting that one of the keepers had left the lighthouse without them, which was surprising considering the severity of the weather. The only sign of anything amiss in the lighthouse was an overturned chair by the kitchen table. Of the keepers there was no sign, either inside the lighthouse or anywhere on the island. Oilskin jacket (left) and high trousers (right). ...


Moore and three volunteer seamen were left to attend the light and the Hesperus returned to the shore station at Breasclete. Captain Harvie sent a telegram to the Northern Lighthouse Board stating: Breasclete or Brèascleit is a village on the west side of the Isle of Lewis, in Scotland. ... Cape Wrath lighthouse The Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB), previously known as the Commissioners of Northern Light Houses, is the organisation responsible for marine navigation aids around the coastal areas of Scotland and the Isle of Man. ...

"A dreadful accident has happened at the Flannans. The three keepers, Ducat, Marshall and the Occasional have disappeared from the Island. The clocks were stopped and other signs indicated that the accident must have happened about a week ago. Poor fellows must have been blown over the cliffs or drowned trying to rescue a crane or something like that."[4]

The men remaining on the island scoured every corner for clues as to the fate of the keepers. At the east landing everything was intact, but the west landing provided considerable evidence of damage caused by recent storms. A box at 33 metres (110 feet) above sea level had been broken and its contents strewn about; iron railings were bent over, the iron railway by the path was wrenched out of its concrete, and a rock weighing over a ton had been displaced above that. On top of the cliff at over 60 metres (200 feet) above sea level turf had been ripped away over 10 metres (30 feet) from the cliff edge. However, the keepers had kept their log until 9 a.m. on 15 December and this made it clear the damage had occurred before the writers' unscheduled disappearance.[4][5] Turf may refer to Sod, the surface layer of ground consisting of a matt of grass and grass roots, sometimes used as a construction material AstroTurf, or any variety of artificial turf made to resemble grass A colloquialism for the world of horse-racing Slang for territory claimed by a... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Speculations and misconceptions

No bodies were ever found and the loneliness of the rocky islets may have leant itself to feverish imaginings. Theories abounded and resulted in ‘fascinated national speculation’.[13] Some were simply elaborations on the truth. For example, the events were commemorated in Wilfrid Wilson Gibson's 1912 ballad, Flannan Isle.[5] The poem refers to a half-eaten meal on the table, indicating that the keepers had been suddenly disturbed. Wilfrid Wilson Gibson (October 2, 1878 - May 26, 1962), was a British poet, associated with World War I but also the author of much later work. ... Flannan Isle is a famous English poem by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson, first published in 1912. ...

Yet, as we crowded through the door,
We only saw a table spread
For dinner, meat, and cheese and bread;
But, all untouched; and no-one there,
As though, when they sat down to eat,
Ere they could even taste,
Alarm had come, and they in haste
Had risen and left the bread and meat,
For at the table head a chair
Lay tumbled on the floor.[14]

However, Nicholson (1995) makes it clear that this does not square with Moore's recorded observations of the scene which states that: "The kitchen utensils were all very clean, which is a sign that it must be after dinner some time they left."[4][15]


Other rumours, such as that one keeper had murdered the other two and then thrown himself into the sea in a fit of remorse, that a sea serpent (or giant seabird) had carried the men away, that they had been abducted by foreign spies, or that they had met their fate through the malevolent presence of a boat filled with ghosts were less plausible. The baleful influence of the ‘Phantom of the Seven Hunters’ was widely suspected locally.[4]


Northern Lighthouse Board investigation

Northern Lighthouse Board Ensign

On 29 December, Robert Muirhead, an NLB superintendent, arrived to conduct the official investigation into the incident. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The explanation offered by Muirhead is more prosaic than the fanciful rumours suggested. He examined the clothing left behind in the lighthouse and concluded that James Ducat and Thomas Marshall had gone down to the landing stage, and that Donald McArthur (the 'Occasional') had left the lighthouse in heavy rain in his shirt sleeves. (Whoever left the light last and unattended was in breach of NLB rules).[4] He also noted that some of the damage to the west landing was “difficult to believe unless actually seen”.[5]

"From evidence which I was able to procure I was satisfied that the men had been on duty up till dinner time on Saturday the 15 December, that they had gone down to secure a box in which the mooring ropes, landing ropes etc. were kept, and which was secured in a crevice in the rock about 110 ft above sea level, and that an extra large sea had rushed up the face of the rock, had gone above them, and coming down with immense force, had swept them completely away.”[16]

Whether this explanation brought any comfort to the families is unknown. The deaths of Thomas Marshal, James Ducat (who left a widow and four children) and Donald McArthur (who left a widow and two children) cast a shadow over the lighthouse service for many years to come.[5]


Later theories and interpretations

The westernmost of the Flannan Isles: Eilean a' Ghobha and Roareim with Brona Cleit in the distance.
The westernmost of the Flannan Isles: Eilean a' Ghobha and Roareim with Brona Cleit in the distance.

Nicholson (1995) offers an alternative idea for the demise of the keepers. The coastline of Eilean Mòr is deeply indented with narrow gullies called geos. The west landing, which is situated in such a geo, terminates in a cave. In high seas or storms, water would rush into the cave and then explode out again with considerable force. Nicholson speculates that McArthur may have seen a series of large waves approaching the island, and knowing the likely danger to his colleagues, ran down to warn them, only to succumb himself as well.[17] This theory has the advantages of explaining the over-turned chair, and the set of oilskins remaining indoors,[4] although not perhaps the closed door and gate.[3] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... In the Shetland and Orkney islands, a geo or gio (from Old Norse gjá[1]) is an inlet, a gully or a narrow and deep cleft in the face of a cliff. ...


Smith (2004) attributes the origins of the theory to Walter Aldebert, a keeper on the Flannans from 1953-1957. Aldebert believed one man may have been washed into the sea, that his companion rushed back to the light for help but that both would-be rescuers were themselves washed away by a second freak wave.[3] The Draupner wave, a single giant wave measured on New Years Day 1995, finally confirmed the existence of freak waves, which had previously been considered near-mythical Freak waves, also known as rogue waves or monster waves, are relatively large and spontaneous ocean surface waves which can sink even...


The event remains a popular issue of contention among those who are interested in paranormal activity. Inevitably perhaps, modern imaginations speculate about abduction by aliens.[13] Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ... For other uses of related terms, see abduction. ...


On a more positive note, the mystery was the inspiration for the composer Peter Maxwell Davies's modern chamber opera The Lighthouse (1979).[18] A composer is a person who writes music. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ... Chamber opera is a designation for operas written to be performed with a chamber ensemble rather than a full orchestra. ... The Lighthouse is a chamber opera with words and music by Peter Maxwell Davies, first performed in Edinburgh on 2 September 1980. ...


Angela J. Elliott wrote a novel about the disappearance of the lighthouse keepers. Published in 2005 it is called "Some Strange Scent of Death", after a line from Gibson's poem.[19]


See also

Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... Wilfrid Wilson Gibson (October 2, 1878 - May 26, 1962), was a British poet, associated with World War I but also the author of much later work. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ... A 1881 painting of the Amazon (later renamed Mary Celeste) by an unknown artist The Mary Celeste was a brigantine found in the Atlantic Ocean unmanned and under full sail heading towards the Strait of Gibraltar in 1872. ... “Missing persons” redirects here. ... The following is a compilation of people who have mysteriously disappeared, whose death is not substantiated, whose remains have not been recovered, whose current whereabouts are unknown, and who (except for the most recent cases) may be presumed deceased. ... The Draupner wave, a single giant wave measured on New Years Day 1995, finally confirmed the existence of freak waves, which had previously been considered near-mythical Rogue waves, also known as freak waves, or extreme waves, are relatively large and spontaneous ocean surface waves which are a threat...

References and footnotes

  1. ^ 2001 UK Census per List of islands of Scotland
  2. ^ Haswell-Smith, Hamish. (2004) The Scottish Islands. Edinburgh. Canongate.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Haswell-Smith, Hamish. (2004) The Scottish Islands. Edinburgh. Canongate
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Nicholson, Christopher. (1995) Rock Lighthouses of Britain: The End of an Era? Caithness. Whittles.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Munro, R.W. (1979) Scottish Lighthouses. Stornoway. Thule Press.
  6. ^ a b Murray, W.H. (1973) The Islands of Western Scotland. London. Eyre Methuen.
  7. ^ a b Northern Lighthouse Board website
  8. ^ a b c Guide to the Flannan Isles
  9. ^ Munro, Sir Donald (1594) Description of the Western Isles of Scotland.
  10. ^ Martin, Martin (1703) A Description of the Western Isles of Scotland including A Voyage to St. Kilda
  11. ^ Scottish Natural Heritage list of SSSIs. Retrieved 2006-12-28
  12. ^ Perrot, D. et al (1995) The Outer Hebrides Handbook and Guide. Machynlleth. Kittiwake.
  13. ^ a b Bathhurst, Bella. (2000) The Lighthouse Stevensons. London. Flamingo.
  14. ^ Quotation from Nicholson (1995).
  15. ^ Smith (2004) nonetheless states: “A meal of cold meat, pickles and potatoes was untouched on the kitchen table.”
  16. ^ Munro (1979) op cit pages 170-1, although Nicholson (1995), Bathhurst (2000) and Smith (2004) quote the same report using somewhat different language: "After a careful examination of the place.... I am of the opinion that the most likely explanation of the disappearance of the men is that they had all gone down on the afternoon of Saturday, 15 December to the proximity of the west landing to secure the box with the mooring ropes etc. and that an unexpectedly large roller had come up on the island, and that a large body of water going up higher than where they were and coming down upon them, swept them away with resistless force.”
  17. ^ Smith (2004) suggests these events are "very rare”.
  18. ^ Peter Maxwell Davies: An Overview of his Works until 1996 by Paul Griffiths Retrieved 2006-11-25
  19. ^ Elliott, Angela J. (2005) Some Strange Scent of Death. Whittles. ISBN 978-1904445-15-9.

This is a list of the islands of Scotland, the mainland of which is part of the island of Great Britain, as well as a table of the largest Scottish islands. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

58°17′0″N, 07°35′0″WCoordinates: 58°17′0″N, 07°35′0″W This article is about the Hebrides islands in Scotland. ... The Hebrides (Inner Hebrides in red) The Inner Hebrides are a group of islands off the west coast of Scotland, to the south east of the Outer Hebrides. ... The Ascrib Islands are a group of small islands lying in Loch Snizort off the north west coast of Skye, Scotland. ... Canna (Gaelic Canaigh )is the westernmost of the Small Isles, in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. ... Cara Island is a small island which is located off the west coast of Kintyre in Scotland, one kilometre south of Gigha. ... Coll shown within Argyll Coll is a small island (about 21 km long and 5 km wide) in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, west of Mull. ... Colonsay shown within Argyll Colonsay [Colbhasa] is an island in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, located north of Islay and south of Mull. ... The Crowlin Islands (gaelic: crò linne) a group of uninhabited islands in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. ... Island of Eigg, as seen from a ferry An Sgurr Eigg is one of the Small Isles, in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. ... The twin beaches at Eilean Garbh, Isle of Gigha. ... Iona is a small island, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland. ... Isay is an uninhabited island in the Inner Hebrides of the west coast of Scotland. ... Islay (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: , or ee-luh), a Scottish island, known as The Queen of the Hebrides, is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides. ... Jura shown within Argyll Satellite picture of Jura Jura (Scottish Gaelic Diùra) is a Scottish island, in the Inner Hebrides. ... Looking towards Gylen Castle, Kerrera. ... Lismore (coloured red) shown within Argyll Lismore is an island in Loch Linnhe, in Argyll, on the west coast of Scotland. ... Oronsay is a small island south of Colonsay in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. ... Muck is the smallest of the Small Isles, part of the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. ... Tobermory with 700 people, the largest settlement on Mull, is home to the only whisky distillery on the island. ... Raasay is an island between the Isle of Skye and the mainland of Scotland. ... Rona, sometimes called South Rona to distinguish it from North Rona, is a small island in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, north of Raasay and north east of Skye. ... Rùm (a Scottish Gaelic name which is usually anglicised to Rum) is one of the Small Isles, in Lochaber, Highland, Scotland. ... Map of the Hebrides. ... The Slate Islands are an island group in the Inner Hebrides, lying immediately off the west coast of Scotland, north of Jura and south west of Oban. ... Soay From Old Norse so-øy meaning Sheep Island Soay is an island just off the south coast of Skye, occasionally considered part of the Small Isles. ... Fingals Cave around 1900 View from West to East Staffa (Norse for staff, column, or pillar island), an island of the Inner Hebrides in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. ... This article is about the Summer Isles in Scotland. ... Looking West to Balephuil Bay, across the famous Hebridean Machair. ... Puffins on Lunga. ... Ulva is a privately owned island in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, off the west coast of Mull. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (935x1450, 61 KB) Summary A map of the Inner and Outer Hebrides in Scotland. ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... Castlebay, Barra Traigh Eaig beach This article is about the island of Barra in Scotland. ... The Barra Isles, also known as the Bishops Isles as they were historically owned by the church, are a small archipelago of islands in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... Benbecula (Scottish Gaelic: Beinn na Faoghla, meaning the mountain of the ford) is an island of the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... Berneray (From viking Bjorns Isle) (Scottish Gaelic: Bheàrnaraidh) is an island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... Not to be confused with Eriska. ... Great Bernera, often known just as Bernera (Scottish Gaelic: Bearnaraigh) is an island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... An Cliseam from the Abhainn Mharaig, just off the main road to Lewis. ... For other uses, see Lewis (disambiguation). ... The Monach Islands, also known as Heisker (Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Heisgeir), are an island group west of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... North Rona, often just called Rona, is a remote Scottish island in the North Atlantic. ... Location of North Uist Landsat image of North Uist North Uist (Scottish Gaelic: Uibhist a Tuath) is an island of the Outer Hebrides. ... Rockall, a small, isolated rocky islet in the North Atlantic Ocean Rockall is a small uninhabited rocky islet in the North Atlantic and one of the sea areas named in the Shipping Forecast broadcast on BBC Radio 4. ... Scalpay is an island in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland west of Harris, to which it is linked by a bridge. ... The Shiant Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Na h-Eileanan Seunta) are an island group in the Minch, east of Harris in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. ... Location of South Uist South Uist (Scottish Gaelic: Uibhist a Deas) is an island of the Outer Hebrides in Scotland. ... St Kilda (Scottish Gaelic: ) is an isolated archipelago situated 64 kilometres (40 mi) west-northwest of North Uist in the North Atlantic Ocean. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Western Isles - MSN Encarta (916 words)
The main administrative centre is Stornoway (population, 1991, 5,975) on the Isle of Lewis.
The Western Isles Authority area was created under the 1975 Scottish local government reforms by the merger of parts of the former counties of Ross and Cromarty and Inverness-shire.
The Western Isles are administered by an all-purpose unitary authority, the Western Isles Council (Comhairle nan Eilean Siar), which was established under the local government reforms implemented in 1975.
The Hebrides - LoveToKnow 1911 (1599 words)
Of these the Lewis portion of Long Island, the Shiants and the Flannan belong to the county of Ross and Cromarty, and the remainder to Inverness-shire.
His son, Donald of the Isles, was memorable for his rebellion in support of his claim to the earldom of Ross, in which, however, he was unsuccessful.
Alexander, son of Donald, resumed the hereditary warfare against the Scottish crown; and in 1462 a treaty was concluded between Alexander's son and successor John and Edward IV.
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