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Encyclopedia > Flag of the United States Marine Corps
USMC Flag

Contents

Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Official Colors of the Marine Corps

The Flag of the United States Marine Corps (also known as a standard or battle color) is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and gold. It was adopted on January 18, 1939, although Marine Corps Order 4 had established scarlet and gold and the official colors of the Corps as early as 1925. The indoor/parade version is bordered by a gold fringe while the outdoor version is plain. It measures 55 inches on the hoist and 62 inches on the fly. [1] [2] The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Color Sergeant

The official battle color of the Corps is maintained by Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. (“8th and I”), and carried by the Color Sergeant of the Marine Corps. The position of the Color Sergeant was first officially designated in 1965 and was first held by Gunnery Sgt. Shelton L. Eakin. The billet is a two-year tour open to all Sergeants; the only caveat being that the applicant must be 76 inches tall (6 feet, 4 inches) and pass a rigorous White House security check. In addition to the multi-colored battle streamers affixed to the top of the staff, the staff itself is covered with sterling silver bands engraved with the names of conflicts in which the Corps has been engaged. Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. is located at 8th and I streets in Washington, D.C.. Established by the U.S. Marine Corps in 1801, it is an historical site and home to the Commandant and to enlisted Marines who perform ceremonial functions, such as honor guards and funeral escorts. ...


History

Very little information is available regarding the flags carried by early American Marines, although indications are that the Grand Union Flag was carried ashore by the battalion led by Captain Samuel Nicholas on New Providence Island, 3 March 1776. It is quite possible that the Gadsden flag was also carried on this expedition. Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... Samuel Nicholas (circa 1744 - August 27, 1790) was the first officer commissioned in the United States Continental Marines (now the United States Marine Corps), and by tradition is considered to be the first Commandant of the Marine Corps. ... (This article is about the island in the Bahamas. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... The Gadsden Flag The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag. ...


The standard carried by the Marines during the 1830s and 1840s consisted of a white field with gold fringe, and bore an elaborate design of an anchor and eagle in the center. Prior to the Mexican-American War, this flag bore the legend "To the Shores of Tripoli" across the top. Shortly after the war, the legend was revised to read: "From Tripoli to the Halls of the Montezumas." Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Tripoli (Arabic: طرابلس Tarābulus) is the capital city of Libya. ...


During the Mexican and Civil Wars, Marines in the field apparently carried a flag similar to the national flag, consisting of red and white stripes and a union. The union, however, contained an eagle perched on a shield of the United States and a half-wreath beneath the shield, with 29 stars encircling the entire design. Beginning in 1876, Marines carried the national colors (the Stars and Stripes) with "U.S. Marine Corps" embroidered in yellow on the middle red stripe.


At the time of the Vera Cruz landing in 1914, a more distinctive standard was carried by Marines. The design consisted of a blue field with a laurel wreath encircling the Marine Corps emblem in the center. A scarlet ribbon above the emblem carried the words "U.S. Marine Corps," while another scarlet ribbon below the emblem carried the motto "Semper Fidelis." Veracruz from space, July 1997 The city of Veracruz is a major port city and municipality on the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican state of Veracruz. ...


Orders were issued on 2 April 1921 which directed all national colors be manufactured without the yellow fringe and without the words "U.S. Marine Corps" embroidered on the red stripe. This was followed by an order dated 14 March 1922, retiring from use all national colors still in use with yellow fringe or wording on the flag. Following World War I, the Army practice of attaching silver bands carrying inscriptions enumerating specific decorations and battles was adopted. This practice was discontinued on 23 January 1961. is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Marine Corps Order No. 4 of 18 April 1925 designated gold and scarlet as the official colors of the U.S. Marine Corps. These colors, however, were not reflected in the official Marine Corps standard until 18 January 1939, when a new design incorporating the new colors was approved. The design was essentially that of today's Marine Corps standard. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


For a brief time following World War I, the inscribing of battle honors directly on the colors of a unit was in practice, but realization that a multiplicity of honors and the limited space on the colors made the system impractical, and the procedure was discontinued. On 29 July 1936, a Marine Corps Board recommended that the Army system of attaching streamers to the staff of the organizational colors be adopted. Such a system was finally authorized by Marine Corps Order No. 157, dated 3 November 1939, and is currently in practice. is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Streamers

The following streamers are authorized, in order of precedence: [3]

  • Note that a "x #" designation denotes the number of streamers used to carry devices (maximum of 8), not the number of awards.

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Joint Meritorious Unit Award is a military award that was established on June 4, 1981 by Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger and was implemented by Department of Defense Directive 1348. ... Navy Unit Commendation The Navy Unit Commendation of the United States Navy is an award that was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal on 18 December 1944. ... The Valorous Unit Award is a decoration which is awarded to units of the United States Army which display extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States of America. ... The Meritorious Unit Commendation is a mid-level unit award of the United States military which is awarded to any military command which displays exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service, heroic deeds, or valorous actions. ... The Meritorious Unit Commendation is a mid-level unit award of the United States military which is awarded to any military command which displays exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service, heroic deeds, or valorous actions. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ... The Barbary Wars (or Tripolitan Wars) were two wars between the United States of America and Barbary States in North Africa in the early 19th century. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... The slave trade in Africa has existed for thousands of years. ... Roadtown, Tortola The term British West Indies refers to territories in and around the Caribbean which were colonised by Great Britain. ... Pirates may refer to: A group of people committing any of these activities: Piracy at sea or on a river/lake. ... The Indian Campaign Medal is a decoration of the United States Army which was first created in 1905. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Army & Navy Civil War Campaign Medals The Civil War Campaign Medal is considered the first campaign service medal of the United States military. ... The Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal is a decoration of the United States Marine Corps which was first created on May 8, 1919. ... Army Spanish Campaign Medal The Spanish Campaign Medal was a military award of the United States Armed Forces which recognized those members of the U.S. military who had served in the Spanish-American War. ... Army and Navy versions of the Philippine Campaign Medal The Philippine Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States Armed Forces which was created to denote service of U.S. military members in the Philippine-American War between the years of 1898 and 1913. ... China Relief Expedition Medal The China Relief Expedition Medal was a decoration of the United States military which was issued to members of both the U.S. Navy and the United States Marines for service in the China Relief Expedition between 1900 and 1901. ... The Army of Cuban Pacification Medal is a military award of the United States Army which was created by orders of the United States War Department on May 11, 1909. ... First and Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medals The Nicaraguan Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States Navy which was authorized by Presidential Order of Woodrow Wilson on September 22, 1913. ... Army & Navy Mexican Service Medals The Mexican Service Medal is an award of the United States military which was established by General Orders of the United States War Department on December 12, 1917. ... First and Second Haitian Campaign Medals The Haitian Campaign Medal was a military decoration of the United States Navy which was issued in the year 1917 and again in the year 1921. ... The Dominican Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States Navy which was created on December 29, 1921. ... Image File history File links Maltese-Cross-Heraldry. ... The Army of Occupation of Germany Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by an act of the United States Congress on November 21, 1941. ... First and Second Nicaraguan Campaign Medals The Nicaraguan Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States Navy which was authorized by Presidential Order of Woodrow Wilson on September 22, 1913. ... Front and reverse of Yangtze Service Medal The Yangtze Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created in 1930 for presentation to members of the U.S. Navy and United States Marine. ... The China Service Medal was a military medal awarded to U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard personnel. ... The American Defense Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created in 1941 by Executive Order of President Franklin Roosevelt. ... American Campaign Medal The American Campaign Medal was a decoration of the United States military which was first created in 1942 by order of President Franklin Roosevelt. ... The European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal is a miliary decoration of the United States armed forces which was first created in 1942 by Executive Order of President Franklin Roosevelt. ... The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal is a service decoration of the Second World War which was awarded to any member of the United States military who served in the Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945. ... WWII Victory Medal The World War II Victory Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by an act of Congress in July 1945. ... The Navy Occupation Service Medal is a decoration of the United States Navy which was issued to Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard personnel who participated in the European and Asian occupation forces following the close of the Second World War. ... Ribbon for the National Defense Service Medal The National Defense Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States military originally commissioned by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. ... The Korean Service Medal is a decoration of the United States military and was created in November 1950 by order of President Harry Truman. ... The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (AFEM) is a military award of the United States military which was first created in 1961 by Executive Order of President John Kennedy. ... Vietnam Service Medal Vietnam Service Medal ribbon The Vietnam Service Medal is a military award which was created in 1965 by order of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... The Southwest Asia Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by order of President George Bush on March 12, 1991. ... The Kosovo Campaign Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was established by Presidential Order of William J. Clinton on May 3, 2000. ... Afghanistan Campaign Medal obverse (left) and reverse (right). ... The Iraq Campaign Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by Executive Order of President George W. Bush on May 28, 2004. ... The Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (GWOTEM) is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ... The Global War on Terrorism Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States military which was created by Presidential Order of George W. Bush in March 2003. ... The Philippine Defense Medal is a decoration of the Republic of the Philippines which is awarded to commemorate the initial resistance against Japanese invasion between the dates of December 1941 and June 1942. ... The Philippine Liberation Medal is a military award of the Republic of the Philippines which was created by an order of Commonwealth of the Philippines Army Headquarters on December 20, 1944. ... The Philippine Independence Medal is a military decoration of the Republic of the Philippines which was created by order of the Philippine Army Headquarters on July 3, 1946. ... The Croix de guerre 1914-1918 (French for Cross of War) is a French military decoration. ... Philippine P.U.C. The Philippine Presidential Unit Citation is a decoration of the Republic of the Philippines which has been awarded to certain units of the United States military for actions both during and subsequent to the Second World War. ... Korean P.U.C. The Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation is issued by the government of South Korea to both Korean military and foreign units. ... Gallantry Cross Medal and Unit Citation The Vietnam Gallantry Cross is a military decoration of South Vietnam which was established in August 1950. ... Vietnam Civil Actions Medal (First Class) with Second Class Ribbon The Vietnam Civil Actions Medal is a decoration of South Vietnam which was first established in 1964. ...

Organizational Battle Colors

Marine color guard dips the Marine Flag for the national anthem.
Marine color guard dips the Marine Flag for the national anthem.

Each unit in the Corps of battalion-size or larger also hold an organizational color (which makes up the unit's colors along with the national flag). It is usually identical to the Marine Corps battle color, though the scroll will have the unit's name instead of "United States Marine Corps". It will also bear the streamers authorized to the unit, or scarlet and gold tassels if none are authorized. United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ... The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... Union Jack. ...


Each unit has a designated color guard, lead by a color sergeant. He is entrusted with the care of the unit colors, which are a symbol of the United States, the Marine Corps, and the commander him/herself. The organizational colors are often passed as part of change of command ceremonies to symbolize the transfer of office. When not in use as part of a parade or ceremony, the colors are traditionally kept in the commander's office. United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ...


Guidons

A guidon for Alpha company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines
A guidon for Alpha company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines

A Marine guidon is always rectangular, 22 by 28 inches, with a scarlet field and gold lettering, and an Eagle, Globe, and Anchor centered. 3rd Battalion 3rd Marines (3/3) is an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps based out of Marine Corps Base Hawaii consisting of approximately 1000 Marines and Sailors. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... In the United States Army and Air Force, a guidon is a military standard that company-sized elements carry to signify their unit designation and corps affiliation. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ...


Fleet Marine Forces units have "FMF" emblazoned above the EGA, reserve units display "USMCR", and all others have "USMC". The regimental level numeral will be displayed in the lower left corner, unless a higher or lower command numeral provides better identification (for example, a battalion HQ company would display the battalion's numeral instead of the regiment). The company level designation letter, abbreviated title, or number will be in the lower right corner. The Fleet Marine Force is a combined command of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps which comprises a combination of permanent afloat personnel, stationed on U.S. Navy ships, and ground units of the United States Marine Corps infantry branch. ...


No additional attachments are authorized, including streamers, bands, or the like. Some units incorporate additional mascots into unofficial guidons.


Guidons are used in the same manner as colors for a company or platoon sized unit. Much like the colors, the guidon represents the unit commander. It is entrusted to the unit guide for parades and ceremonies, and displayed in or near the commander's office when he is present.


Guidons are also used in recruit training to identify individual platoons. First and second phase platoons have a gold background with their four-digit platoon number in scarlet, while third phase platoons have a scarlet background with gold lettering and trim. The guidon is used as an aid to instilling unit identity and pride, representing the platoon. Some drill instructors will test that pride by attempting to dishonor the guidon and expecting the recruits to intervene. Also, the recruit assigned to carry it, the guide, is treated as the most senior recruit of the platoon. He marks the line of advance in close-quarters drill. This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Personal Flags

General-grade officers and the Commandant of the Marine Corps are authorized a personal flag, which displays their rank insignia. A red background with white stars are used, while the Commandant also has a grey and gold Eagle, Globe, and Anchor. These flags are often used to mark a command headquarters in garrison, as well as a symbol for the general himself. The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ...


Shared aspects

Spearhead
Spearhead

All Marine flags share a similar staff and spearhead. The base of the spearhead is used to support streamers or tassels if authorized. Organizational colors may also have silver bands, awarded for participation in a battle or campaign, though the practice has been discontinued.


A color mounted on a vehicle of some type is referred to as a standard. When the national flag is flown from a ship, it is referred to as the national ensign.

See also

United States Marine Corps Portal 

Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The several branches of the United States armed forces are represented by flags, among other emblems and insignia. ... United States Federal Protective Service color guard. ... In the United States Army and Air Force, a guidon is a military standard that company-sized elements carry to signify their unit designation and corps affiliation. ...

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the United States Marine Corps.
  • Text adapted from History of the Marine Corps Flag
  1. ^ "Flag Manual", MCO P10520.3B, 15 Sep 1989, <http://www.usmc.mil/directiv.nsf/55fdafde3f044b0585256bd40066708b/aca390d7d0db6adb85256926005ff32b/$FILE/MCO%20P10520.3B.pdf>
  2. ^ McMillan, Joseph (2001). Flags of the U.S. Marine C. Seaflags. Retrieved on Jan 10 2008.
  3. ^ Current Award, Campaign, Service, and Expeditionary Streamer Entitlement, to the Battle Colors of the Marine Corps, <http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/HD/Customes_Traditions/Streamers_02.htm>
Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The United States Marine Corps is administered by the Department of the Navy, which is lead by the Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV). ... Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), located in Washington, D.C., includes the offices of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and various agencies and staff functions. ... Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... The III Marine Expeditionary Force, is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force of the United States Marine Corps that is forward-deployed and able to deploy rapidly and conduct operations across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to amphibious assault and high intensity combat. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ... United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) is a component command of the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) that comprises the Marine Corps contribution to SOCOM. Its core capabilities are direct action, special reconnaissance, foreign internal defense, counterterrorism, information operations, and unconventional warfare. ... Not to be confused with Marine Recon Battalions. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... . ... Marine AV-8B Harrier II on the deck of USS Nassau While other nations have Marines who are aviators, only the United States Marine Corps has its own dedicated aviation arm. ... The following is a list of Marine Expeditionary Units of the United States Marine Corps. ... Marine ranks in descending order, with tables indicating abbreviations in the style used by the Marine Corps, pay grades, and rank insignia: // Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that... Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that confers the rank and authority of a Marine Officer. ... Enlisted Marines with paygrades of E-4 and E-5 are considered Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) while those at E-6 and higher are considered Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). ... The following is a list of people who served in the United States Marine Corps and have gained fame through previous or subsequent endeavors, infamy, or successes: Joseph M. Acaba Joseph M. Acaba — NASA astronaut Don Adams — actor Mike Anderson — NFL football player Walter Anderson (editor) — author; PARADE Magazine  editor... The following is a list of the essential names in Marine Corps lore; the people who make up what the Marines call Knowledge. John Basilone — only Medal of Honor recipient to return to combat and be killed. ... The Marine Corps League is the only federally-chartered United States Marine Corps-related veterans organization in the U.S. Its Federal Charter was approved by the 75th U.S. Congress and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on August 4, 1937. ... MCMAP logo The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close combat techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in what the Marine Corps calls the Warrior Ethos.[1... United States Marine Corps Boot Camp, otherwise known as Recruit Training is a program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete to join the United States Marine Corps. ... The School of Infantry (SOI) — SOI East, located at United States Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, a satellite facility of Camp Lejeune, and the SOI West at Camp Pendleton — host the second stage of initial military training for enlisted Marines after recruit training. ... The United States Marine Corps Officer Candidates School (OCS) is a school located on Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico that trains, screens, and evaluates potential Marine Corps officers. ... The Basic School (TBS) is where all newly commissioned United States Marine Corps officers are sent to learn the art and science of being a Marine officer. ... // The Special Missions Training Center (SMTC) is a US Coast Guard run training facility that is located in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. ... The Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services. ... Military awards of the United States Department of the Navy are those military decorations which are presented to members of the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy. ... Badges of the United States Marine Corps are military decorations which are issued by the United States Department of the Navy to service members of the U.S. Marines to denote a variety of qualifications and accomplishments. ... This is a list of weapons used by the United States Marine Corps: // M9 bayonet OKC-3S bayonet Ka-Bar Strider SMF Gerber Mark II Marine Noncommissioned Officers Sword, 1859-Present Marine Officers Mameluke Sword, 1875-Present M1911A1 . ... Marines test the MTV while running an obstacle course at MCB Hawaii. ... U.S. Marines wearing the Lightweight Helmet. ... An ILBE pack is visible on the second Marine from the left The Improved Load Bearing Equipment or ILBE is the United States Marine Corps new backpack, designed to replace the existing ALICE and MOLLE packs currently in service. ... The United States Marine Corps was originally organized as the Continental Marines in 1775 to conduct ship-to-ship fighting, provide shipboard security and assist in landing forces. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... The Silent Drill Platoon performs in front of the home of the Commandant of the Marine Corps The United States Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon, often referred to as The Marching Twenty-Four, performs a unique precision exhibition drill. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... The Riflemans Creed, also known as My Rifle and The Creed of The United States Marine, is a part of basic United States Marine Corps doctrine. ... An early official promotional photo from the Toys for Tots program Motorcyclists fill eastbound I-76 for the 2002 Toys for Tots parade to benefit patients at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia InPhonics CEO and CFO present the results of the companys Toys for Tots drive at InPhonic... Aerial view of the Museum under construction, taken April 2006. ... This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Flag of the United States Marine Corps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (737 words)
The Flag of the United States Marine Corps is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and yellow.
The official battle color of the Corps is maintained by Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. (“8th and I”), and carried by the Color Sergeant of the Marine Corps.
On 29 July 1936, a Marine Corps Board recommended that the Army system of attaching streamers to the staff of the organizational colors be adopted.
United States Marine Corps - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (8497 words)
Marine Corps is the second smallest of the five branches (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard) of the U.S. military, with 180,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2005.
The Marine Corps has a widely held reputation as a fierce and effective fighting force and the Marines take pride in their gung-ho attitude, they are indoctrinated with a strong belief in their chain of command and the importance of esprit de corps, a spirit of enthusiasm and pride in themselves and the Corps.
Marines are regularly admonished from the time that they are recruits in boot camp that their conduct, even while on liberty, leave, or after they are discharged, can and will reflect upon the Corps.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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