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Encyclopedia > Flag of the United States
Flag of the United States of America
Flag of the United States of America
Names The Stars and Stripes, Old Glory
Use National flag and ensign. National flag and ensign
Proportion 10:19
Adopted June 14, 1777 (13-star version)
July 4, 1960 (50-star version)
Design Thirteen horizontal stripes alternating red and white; in the canton, 50 white stars on a blue field
Designed by Various
Union Jack. Used as the state jack; used as the naval jack, 1960–2002.
Current naval jack, known as the First Navy Jack.

The flag of the United States of America consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars (top and bottom) alternating with rows of five stars. The creator of the U.S. Flag is popularly considered to be Betsy Ross. The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 U.S. states and the 13 stripes represent the original Thirteen Colonies that rebelled against the British crown and became the first states in the Union.[1] Nicknames for the flag include the stars and stripes, Old Glory,[2] the American flag, and the star-spangled banner (also the name of the country's official national anthem). Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is an incomplete list of names used for specific flags, either as officially designated titles or traditional nicknames. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... Image File history File links FIAV_111111. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links US_Naval_Jack. ... Image File history File links FIAV_000010. ... The jack of the United States is a maritime flag representing United States nationality flown on the jackstaff in the bow of its vessels. ... Image File history File links Naval_Jack_of_the_United_States. ... Image File history File links FIAV_000001. ... US First Navy Jack In the fall of 1775, as the first ships of the Continental Navy readied in the Delaware River, Commodore Esek Hopkins issued, in a set of fleet signals, an instruction directing his vessels to fly a striped Jack and Ensign. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the colour. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... The star, as an ideograph, most commonly represents the astronomical star for which it is named. ... The Betsy Ross Flag The Betsy Ross Flag is an early design of American Flag popularly attributed to Betsy Ross using the common motifs of alternating red-and-white striped field with white stars in a blue canton. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ...


Because of its symbolism, the starred blue canton is called the "union". This part of the national flag can stand alone as a maritime flag called the Union Jack[3] which served as the U.S. jack on warships from 1777 until 2002. It continues to be used as a jack by various federally-owned vessels, including those of the Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. A maritime flag is a flag designated for use on boats and other watercraft. ... The jack of the United States is a maritime flag representing United States nationality flown on the jackstaff in the bow of its vessels. ... The jack of the United States is a maritime flag representing United States nationality flown on the jackstaff in the bow of its vessels. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is a United States Navy (USN) organization that controls most of the replenishment and military transport ships of the Navy. ... The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a scientific agency of the United States Department of Commerce focused on the conditions of the oceans and the atmosphere. ...

Contents

Symbolism

The flag of the United States is one of the nation's widely recognized and used symbols. Within the U.S. it is frequently displayed, not only on public buildings, but on private residences, as well as iconically in forms such as decals for car windows, and clothing ornaments such as badges and lapel pins. Throughout the world it is used in public discourse to refer to the U.S., both as a nation state, government, and set of policies, but also as an ideology and set of ideas.


Many understand the flag to represent the freedoms and rights guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution and its Bill of Rights and perhaps most of all to be a symbol of individual and personal liberty as set forth in the Declaration of Independence. The flag is a complex and contentious symbol, around which emotions run high. Wikisource has original text related to this article: The United States Constitution The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... The United States Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to...


Apart from the numbers of stars and stripes representing the number of current and original states, respectively, and the union with its stars representing a constellation, there is no legally defined symbolism to the colors and shapes on the flag. However, folk theories and traditions abound; for example, that the stripes refer to rays of sunlight and that the stars refer to the heavens, the highest place that a person could aim to reach.[4] Tradition holds that George Washington proclaimed: "We take the stars from Heaven, the red from our mother country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing that we have separated from her, and the white stripes shall go down to posterity representing Liberty."[5] This article is about the star grouping. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ...


Design

Specification

The basic design of the flag is specified by 4 U.S.C. § 1 with 4 U.S.C. § 2 outlining the addition of new stars representing new states. The specification gives the following values: Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States_specification. ... Title 4 of the United States Code outlines the role of Flag of the United States, Great Seal of the United States, Washington, DC, and the States in the United States Code. ... Title 4 of the United States Code outlines the role of Flag of the United States, Great Seal of the United States, Washington, DC, and the States in the United States Code. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States_specification. ...

  • Hoist (width) of the flag: A = 1.0
  • Fly (length) of the flag: B = 1.9
  • Hoist (width) of the Union: C = 0.5385 (A x 7/13, spanning seven stripes)
  • Fly (length) of the Union: D = 0.76 (B × 2/5, two fifths of the flag length)
  • E = F = 0.0538 (C/10, One tenth the height of the field of stars)
  • G = H = 0.0633 (D/12, One twelfth the width of the field of stars)
  • Diameter of star: K = 0.0616
  • Width of stripe: L = 0.0769 (A/13, One thirteenth of the flag width)

Flag ratios

Note that the flag ratio (B/A in the diagram) is not absolutely fixed. Although the diagram in Executive Order 10834 gives a ratio of 1.9, earlier in the order is a list of flag sizes authorized for executive agencies. This list permits eleven specific flag sizes (specified by height and width) for such agencies: 20.00 × 38.00; 10.00 × 19.00; 8.95 × 17.00; 7.00 × 11.00; 5.00 × 9.50; 4.33 × 5.50; 3.50 × 6.65; 3.00 × 4.00; 3.00 × 5.70; 2.37 × 4.50; and 1.32 × 2.50. Eight of these sizes conform to the 1.9 ratio, within a small rounding error (less than 0.01). However, three of the authorized sizes vary significantly: 1.57 (for 7.00 × 11.00), 1.27 (for 4.33 × 5.50) and 1.33 (for 3.00 × 4.00).


Colors

According to Flags of the World, the colors are specified by the General Services Administration "Federal Specification, Flag, National, United States of America and Flag, Union Jack," DDD-F-416E, dated November 27, 1981. It gives the colors by reference to "Standard Color Cards of America" maintained by The Color Association of the United States, Inc., as: Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ... The General Services Administration (GSA) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1949 to help manage and support the basic functioning of federal agencies. ... The jack of the United States is a maritime flag representing United States nationality flown on the jackstaff in the bow of its vessels. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Color Association of the United States (CAUS) is an independent color forecasting and consulting service to the business community. ...

Color Cable color Pantone[6] Web Color[7] RGB Values
      Dark Red 70180 193 C #BF0A30 (191,10,48)
      White 70001 Safe #FFFFFF (255,255,255)
      Navy Blue 70075 281 C #002868 (0,40,104)

This article is about the corporation and its color space. ... Web colors are colors used in designing web pages, and the methods for describing and specifying those colors. ...

Design of the union

When Alaska and Hawaii were being considered for statehood, more than 1,500 designs were spontaneously submitted to President Dwight D. Eisenhower by Americans. Although some of them were 49-star versions, the vast majority were 50-star proposals. At least three, and probably more, of these designs were identical to the present design of the 50-star flag. These designs are in the Eisenhower Presidential Archives in Abilene, Kansas. Only a small fraction of them have ever been published. For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The Eisenhower Presidential Center includes the Eisenhower presidential library, President Dwight David Eisenhowers boyhood home, Museum, and gravesite. ... Abilene is a city in Dickinson County, Kansas, United States, 163 miles (262 km) west of Kansas City. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


One legend states the union of the current 50-star flag was designed by Robert G. Heft in 1958 while living with his grandparents in Ohio. He was 18 years old at the time and did the flag design as a class project. His mother was a seamstress, but refused to do any of the work for him. He originally received a B- for the project. After discussing the grade with his teacher, it was agreed (somewhat jokingly) that if the flag was accepted by Congress, the grade would be reconsidered. Heft's flag design was chosen and adopted by presidential proclamation after Alaska and before Hawaii was admitted into the union in 1959. He got an A.[8] Robert G. Heft is the designer of the 50-star flag, and the proposed 51-star flag for the United States of America. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


At the time, credit was given by the Executive Department to the U.S. Army Bureau of Heraldry for the design. The United States Federal Executive Departments are among the oldest primary units of the executive branch of the federal government of the United States—the Departments of State, War, and the Treasury all being established within a few weeks of each other in 1789. ... The Institute of Heraldry Insignia The United States Army Institute of Heraldry furnishes heraldic services to the U.S. Armed Forces and other United States government organizations, including the Executive Office of the President. ...


Decoration

Traditionally, the flag may be decorated with golden fringe surrounding the perimeter of the flag itself as long as it does not deface the flag proper. Ceremonial displays of the flag, such as those in parades or on indoor posts, often utilize fringe to enhance the beauty of the flag. The first recorded use of fringe on a flag dates from 1835, and the Army used it officially in 1895. No specific law governs the legality of fringe, but a 1925 opinion of the attorney general addresses the use of fringe (and the number of stars)"...is at the discretion of the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy..." as quoted from footnote in previous volumes of Title 4 of the United States Code law books and is a source for claims that such a flag is a military ensign not civilian. The United States Army Institute of Heraldry, which has official custody of the flag designs, and makes any such change ordered, also confirms that there are no implications of symbolism in the use of fringe.[9] Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... United States Marines on parade. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Title 4 of the United States Code outlines the role of Flag of the United States, Great Seal of the United States, Washington, DC, and the States in the United States Code. ... The Institute of Heraldry Insignia The United States Army Institute of Heraldry furnishes heraldic services to the U.S. Armed Forces and other United States government organizations, including the Executive Office of the President. ...


Flag etiquette

The United States Flag Code outlines certain guidelines for the use, display, and disposal of the flag. For example, the flag should never be dipped to any person or thing, unless it is the ensign responding to a salute from a ship of a foreign nation. (This tradition comes from the 1908 Summer Olympics in London, where countries were asked to dip their flag to King Edward VII: the American team captain Martin Sheridan refused, famously proclaiming that "this flag dips to no earthly king."[10]). The flag should never be allowed to touch the ground and, if flown at night, must be illuminated. If the edges become tattered through wear, the flag should be repaired or replaced. When a flag is so tattered that can no longer serve as a symbol of the United States, it should be destroyed in a dignified manner, preferably by burning. The American Legion and other organizations regularly conduct dignified flag-burning ceremonies, often on Flag Day, June 14. Wikisource has original text related to this article: United States Flag Code The United States Flag Code establishes advisory rules for display and care of the American Flag. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: United States Flag Code The United States Flag Code establishes advisory rules for display and care of the American Flag. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... The 1908 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the IV Olympiad, were held in 1908 in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... Martin Sheridan (born March 28, 1881 in Treenduff, Ireland – died March 27, 1918) is a former athlete from the United States, who came as a sixteen year old to the US. He won the discus throw event at the 1904 Summer Olympics. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although the Flag Code is U.S. Federal law, there is no penalty for failure to comply with the Flag Code and it is not widely enforced—indeed, punitive enforcement would conflict with the First Amendment right to freedom of speech. Passage of the proposed Flag Desecration Amendment would overrule legal precedent that has been established in this area. First Amendment may refer to the: First Amendment to the United States Constitution First Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland Categories: ... This article is about the general concept. ... The Flag Desecration Amendment, often referred to as the flag burning amendment, is a controversial proposed constitutional amendment to the United States Constitution that would allow the United States Congress to statutorily prohibit the physical desecration of the flag of the United States. ...


Folding the flag

Folding the U.S. flag
Folding the U.S. flag

Though not part of the official Flag Code, according to military custom flags should be folded into a triangular shape when not in use. (The Philippines, a former American territory, also has this custom for folding its flag.) To properly fold the flag: Image File history File links Fold-us-flag-animated. ... For other uses, see American Empire (disambiguation). ...

  1. Begin by holding it waist-high with another person so that its surface is parallel to the ground.
  2. Fold the lower half of the stripe section lengthwise over the field of stars, holding the bottom and top edges securely.
  3. Fold the flag again lengthwise with the blue field on the outside.
  4. Make a rectangular fold then a triangular fold by bringing the striped corner of the folded edge to meet the open top edge of the flag. Starting the fold from the left side over to the right
  5. Turn the outer end point inward, parallel to the open edge, to form a second triangle.
  6. The triangular folding is continued until the entire length of the flag is folded in this manner (usually thirteen triangular folds, as shown at right). On the final fold, any remnant that does not neatly fold into a triangle (or in the case of exactly even folds, the last triangle) is tucked into the previous fold.
  7. When the flag is completely folded, only a triangular blue field of stars should be visible.

Display

Flags on display on the National Mall.
Flags on display on the National Mall.


The flag is customarily flown year-round at most public buildings, and it is not unusual to find private houses flying full-size flags. Some private use is year-round, but becomes widespread on civic holidays like Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Presidents' Day, Flag Day, and on Independence Day. On Memorial Day it is common to place small flags by war memorials and next to the graves of U.S. war veterans. Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... For Veterans Day in the United Kingdom, see Veterans Day UK. President Eisenhower signs HR7786, officially changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. ... Presidents Day is the common name for the United States federal holiday officially designated as Washingtons Birthday. ... Flag of the United States In the United States, Flag Day (more formally, National Flag Day) is celebrated on June 14. ... These fireworks over the Washington Monument are typical of Fourth of July celebrations In the United States, Independence Day, also called the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. ...


Places of continuous display

Astronaut Alan Shepard raises the United States Flag on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 14 mission.
Astronaut Alan Shepard raises the United States Flag on the surface of the moon during the Apollo 14 mission.

By presidential proclamation, acts of Congress, and custom, American flags are displayed continuously at certain locations. Image File history File links Apollo_14_Shepard. ... Image File history File links Apollo_14_Shepard. ... For other persons named Alan Shepard, see Alan Shepard (disambiguation). ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Apollo 14 was the eighth manned mission in the Apollo program and the third mission to land on the Moon. ...

The Star Spangled Banner Flag is the garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor during the naval portion of the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Flag House & Star-Spangled Banner Museum is the 1793 home of Mary Pickersgill where she sewed the Star Spangled Banner, the garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry in the summer of 1813 during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... The Marine Corps War Memorial is a military memorial statue located near the Arlington National Cemetery in Rosslyn, Virginia, United States. ... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... Arlington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Virginia (which calls itself a commonwealth), directly across the Potomac River from Washington, DC. By an act of Congress July 9, 1846, the area south of the Potomac was returned to Virginia effective in 1847 As of 2000... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Total 16. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the monument in Washington, D.C. For other monuments dedicated to George Washington, see Washington Monuments (world). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Nixon redirects here. ... The United States Customs Service (now part of U.S. Customs and Border Protection or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gettysburg College is a private national four-year liberal arts college founded in 1832, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, adjacent to the famous battlefield. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... This article is about the National Historical Park. ... The Village of Valley Forge is an unincorporated settlement located just outside of Valley Forge National Historic Park in Schuylkill Township of Chester County, Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Colton Liberty Flag is an American flag which is flown continuously over Mt. ... Colton is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Thirteen Star Flag at Middlebrook encampment is displayed continuously The Middlebrook encampment refers to the seasonal encampment of the Continental Army during the American War for Independence at a site near Martinsville, New Jersey that straddles the ridge of the First Watchung mountains. ... Bridgewater Township is a township located in Somerset County, New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur... For other uses, see Worcester (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... [edit] History Located in Taos, New Mexico. ... Taos (IPA: ) is a city in Taos County in the north-central region of New Mexico. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Wild Bill Hickoks Gravesite Mount Moriah Cemetery on Mount Moriah in Deadwood, Lawrence County, South Dakota is the burial place of Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane and Seth Bullock, and other notable figures of the Wild West. ... A photograph of Deadwood in 1876. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... This article covers the Apollo 11 mission itself. ... Apollo 12 was the sixth manned mission in the Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon. ... Apollo 14 was the eighth manned mission in the Apollo program and the third mission to land on the Moon. ... Apollo 15 was the ninth manned mission in the Apollo program and the fourth mission to land on the Moon. ... Apollo 16 was the tenth manned mission in the Apollo program and the fifth mission to land on the Moon. ... Apollo 17 was the eleventh manned space mission in the NASA Apollo program. ...

Particular days of display

The flag should especially be displayed at full staff on the following days:

is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the date January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Presidents Day (also styled Presidents Day or Presidents Day) is the common name for the United States federal holiday officially designated as Washingtons Birthday. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Thanksgiving is a holiday celebrated in much of North America, generally observed as an expression of gratitude, usually to God. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

When Displaying the flag at half staff

The US Flag is displayed at half staff as a sign of respect or mourning. Nationwide, this action is proclaimed by the president of the United States; state-wide or territory-wide, the proclamation is made by the governor. In addition, there is no prohibition against municipal governments, private businesses or citizens flying the flag at half staff as a local sign of respect and mourning. President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first proclamation on March 1, 1954 standardizing the dates and time periods for flying the flag at half staff from all federal buildings, grounds, and naval vessels; other congressional resolutions and presidential proclamations ensued. However, they are only guidelines to all other entities: typically followed at state and local government facilities, and encouraged of private businesses and citizens. Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ...


To properly fly the US flag at half staff, the protocol is to first hoist it briskly to full staff, then reverently (slowly) lower it to half-staff. Similarly, when the flag is to be lowered from half staff, it should be first hoisted briskly to full staff, then lowered reverently to the base of the flagpole.


Federal guidelines state the flag should be flown at half staff at the following dates/times:

  • May 15 - Peace Officers Memorial Day
  • Last Monday in May - Memorial Day (until noon)
  • July 27 - Korean War Veterans Day
  • September 11 - Patriot Day[12]
  • December 7 - Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
  • For 30 days - Death of a US President or former President
  • For 10 days - Death of a US Vice President, Supreme Court Chief Justice/retired Chief Justice, or Speaker of the House of Representatives.
  • From death until the day of interment - US Supreme Court Associate Justice, member of the Cabinet, former Vice President, President pro-tempore of the Senate, or the majority and minority leaders of the Senate and House of Representatives. Also for federal facilities within a state or territory, for the governor.
  • On the day after the death - US Senators, Members of Congress, territorial delegates or the resident commissioner of the commonwealth of Puerto Rico

is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Peace Officers Memorial Day and Police Week is a United States observation that pays tribute to the local, State, and Federal law enforcement officers. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... For the anniversary of the beginning of the American Revolution, see Patriots Day. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

History

See also: Timeline of the Flag of the United States

The flag has been changed 26 times since the new, 13-state union adopted it. The 48-star version went unchanged for 47 years, the longest time the flag went unmodified until July 4, 2007, when the current 50-star flag broke the record. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


First flag

Grand Union Flag ("Continental Colors").
Flag of the British East India Company, 1707–1801

At the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, the United States had no official national flag. The Grand Union Flag has historically been referred to as the "First National Flag"; although it has never had any official status, it was used throughout the American Revolutionary War by George Washington and formed the basis for the design of the first official US flag. Image File history File links Grand_Union_Flag. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_British_East_India_Company_(1707). ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1776 (disambiguation). ... Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... This article is about military actions only. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


This flag is properly considered the de facto first naval ensign of the United States. It was first raised aboard Continental Navy Commodore Esek Hopkins' flagship Alfred on the Delaware River on December 3, 1775,[13] possibly (according to his claim) by the ship's senior lieutenant John Paul Jones. National flag and ensign of the United States, 1960–Present. ... French portrait of Commodore Esek Hopkins Esek Hopkins (26 April 1718 – 26 February 1802), was Commander in Chief of the Fleet throughout the American Revolutionary War. ... For the Delaware River in Kansas, see Delaware River (Kansas). ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ...


The origins of the design are unclear. It closely resembles the British East India Company (BEIC) flag of the same era, and an argument dating to Sir Charles Fawcett in 1937 holds that the BEIC flag indeed inspired the design.[14] However, the BEIC flag could have from 9 to 13 stripes, and was not allowed to be flown outside the Indian Ocean.[15] Both flags could have been easily constructed by adding white stripes to a British Red Ensign, a common flag throughout Britain and its colonies. The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... Charles Fawcett was a British historian. ... The Red Ensign, as currently used by the United Kingdoms Merchant Navy The Red Ensign of the United Kingdom in use in London The Red Ensign or Red Duster is a flag that originated in the early 17th century as an ensign flown by the Royal Navy. ...

Another theory holds that the red-and-white stripe—and later, stars-and-stripes—motif of the flag may have been based[citation needed] on the Washington family coat-of-arms, which consisted of a shield "argent, two bars gules, above, three mullets gules" (a white shield with two red bars below three red stars). Image File history File links COA_George_Washington. ... Image File history File links COA_George_Washington. ... Arms of the head of the Washington Family The coat of arms of George Washington, President of the United States of America from 1789 to 1797, were first used to identify the family in the twelfth century, when one of George Washingtons ancestors took possession of Washington manor in... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


More likely it was based on a flag of the Sons of Liberty, one of which consisted of 13 red and white alternating horizontal stripes. This article discusses the early American patriot group. ...

See also: Flags of the American Revolution



The Flag Resolution of 1777

13-star "Betsy Ross" flag

On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution which stated: "Resolved, That the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, (or more)alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new Constellation." Flag Day is now observed on June 14 of each year. A false tradition holds that the new flag was first hoisted in June of 1777 by the Continental Army at the Middlebrook encampment.[16] Image File history File links US_flag_13_stars_–_Betsy_Ross. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... Flag of the United States In the United States, Flag Day (more formally, National Flag Day) is celebrated on June 14. ... The Continental Army was an army formed after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War by the colonies that became the United States of America. ... Thirteen Star Flag at Middlebrook encampment is displayed continuously The Middlebrook encampment refers to the seasonal encampment of the Continental Army during the American War for Independence at a site near Martinsville, New Jersey that straddles the ridge of the First Watchung mountains. ...


The Flag Resolution did not specify any particular arrangement for the stars. The pictured flag shows the thirteen stars arranged in a circle, the so-called Betsy Ross flag. Although the Betsy Ross legend is not taken seriously by many historians, the design itself is the oldest version of any US flag to appear on any physical relic[citation needed], since it is historically referenced in contemporary battlefield paintings by John Trumbull and Charles Willson Peale, which depict the circular star arrangement. Popular designs at the time were varied and most were individually crafted rather than mass-produced. Other examples of 13-star arrangements can be found on the Francis Hopkinson flag, the Cowpens flag, and the Brandywine flag. Given the scant archaeological and written evidence, it is unknown which design was the most popular at that time. The Betsy Ross Flag The Betsy Ross Flag is an early design of American Flag popularly attributed to Betsy Ross using the common motifs of alternating red-and-white striped field with white stars in a blue canton. ... Francis Hopkinson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The famous Spirit of 76 painting by Archibald MacNeal Willard features the Cowpens flag (not the Betsy Ross design, which is similar). ... Brandywine Flag The Brandywine flag was a banner carried by Captain Robert Wilsons company of the 7th Pennsylvania Regiment. ...


The origin of the stars and stripes design cannot be fully documented. A popular story credits Betsy Ross for sewing the first flag from a pencil sketch by George Washington who personally commissioned her for the job. However, no evidence for this theory exists beyond Ross' descendants' much later recollections of what she told her family. Another woman, Rebecca Young, has also been credited as having made the first flag by later generations of her family. Rebecca Young's daughter was Mary Pickersgill, who made the Star Spangled Banner Flag. For other persons named Betsy Boss, see Betsy Boss (disambiguation). ... The Star Spangled Banner Flag is the garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor during the naval portion of the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. ...


It was the position of the United States government that Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was responsible for the stars in the U.S. flag. Hopkinson designed the flag while he was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board's Middle Department, sometime between his appointment to that position in November of 1776 and the time that the flag resolution was adopted in June of 1777. This contradicts the Betsy Ross legend, which suggests that she sewed the first Stars and Stripes flag by request of the government in the Spring of 1776.[17][18] Hopkinson was the only person to have made such a claim during his own lifetime, when he sent a bill to Congress for his work. He asked for a "Quarter Cask of the Public Wine" as payment initially. The payment was not made, however, because it was determined he had already received a salary as a member of Congress, and he was not the only person to have contributed to the design. It should be noted that no one else contested his claim at the time. Francis Hopkinson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...


The Flag Resolution of 1777 was probably meant to define U.S. Navy ensigns, rather than a national standard. It appears between other resolutions from the Marine Committee. On 10 May 1779, years after the Flag Resolution was passed, Secretary of the Board of War Richard Peters, Jr. expressed concern "it is not yet settled what is the Standard of the United States."[19] USN redirects here. ... Richard Peters, Jr. ...


Later flag acts

15-star, 15-stripe "Star-Spangled Banner" flag
48-star flag, is the second longest in use (1912–1959).
An Urban camouflaged American flag patch, as used by the U.S. Military.
See also: Flag Acts (U.S.)

In 1795, the number of stars and stripes was increased from 13 to 15 (to reflect the entry of Vermont and Kentucky as states of the union). For a time the flag was not changed when subsequent states were admitted, probably because it was thought that this would cause too much clutter. It was the 15-star, 15-stripe flag that inspired Francis Scott Key to write "The Star-Spangled Banner," now the national anthem. Image File history File links US_flag_15_stars. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... Image File history File links FIAV_historical. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (909x588, 150 KB) An Urban Camo American Flag Patch. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (909x588, 150 KB) An Urban Camo American Flag Patch. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... An example of common camouflage The Bronze Horseman camouflaged from the German aircraft during the Siege of Leningrad (August 8, 1941) Camouflage became an essential part of modern military tactics after the increase in accuracy and rate of fire of weapons at the end of the 19th century. ... An Italian flag Patch. ... The United States Armed Forces are the overall unified military forces of the United States. ... The Flag Acts are the three laws which define the design of the Flag of the United States. ... Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ...


On April 4, 1818, a plan was passed by Congress at the suggestion of U.S. Naval Captain Samuel C. Reid[20] in which the flag was changed to have 20 stars, with a new star to be added when each new state was admitted, but the number of stripes would remain at thirteen to honor the original colonies. The act specified that new flag designs should become official on the first July 4 (Independence Day) following admission of one or more new states. The most recent change, from 49 stars to 50, occurred in 1960 when the present design was chosen, after Hawaii gained statehood in August 1959. Before that, the admission of Alaska in January 1959 prompted the debut of a short-lived 49-star flag. is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... In 1775, the British claimed authority over the red and pink areas on this map and Spain ruled the orange. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... These fireworks over the Washington Monument are typical of Fourth of July celebrations In the United States, Independence Day, also called the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday celebrating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...


As of July 4, 2007, the 50-star flag has become the longest rendition in use. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


First salute

The Netherlands was the first country to salute the Grand Union flag, when gun salutes by American ships were returned by officials on Dutch islands in the West Indies in late 1776: on St. Croix in October, and on St. Eustatius in November. (Though later, the better documented St. Eustatius incident involving the USS Andrew Doria is traditionally regarded as the "first salute".) France was the first country to salute the Stars and Stripes, when a fleet off the French mainland returned a gun salute by Captain John Paul Jones commanding the USS Ranger on February 14, 1778. [4] Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... This article is about the gesture. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... A separate article treats the several rivers known as the St. ... Map showing location of Sint Eustatius relative to Saba and Sint Maarten/Saint Martin. ... USS Andrew Doria was purchased by the Continental Congress in October of 1775. ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... The first USS Ranger was a sloop-of-war in the Continental Navy and received the first official salute at sea by a foreign power. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1778 (MDCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Historical progression of designs

See also: List of U.S. states by date of statehood

In the following table depicting the 28 various designs of the United States flag, the star patterns for the flags are merely the usual patterns, often associated with the United States Navy. Canton designs, prior to the proclamation of the 48-star flag by President William Howard Taft on 29 October 1912, had no official arrangement of the stars. Furthermore, the exact colors of the flag were not standardized until 1934.[21] The order which the original 13 states ratified the constitution, then the order that the others were admitted to the union This is a list of U.S. states by date of statehood, that is, the date when each U.S. state joined the Union. ... USN redirects here. ... For other persons named William Howard Taft, see William Howard Taft (disambiguation). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

No. of
Stars
No. of
Stripes
Design States Represented
by New Stars
Dates in Use Duration
0 13 N/A December 3, 1775[13]June 14, 1777 1 year
(18 months)
13 13 Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts,
Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire,
Virginia, New York, North Carolina,
Rhode Island
June 14, 1777May 1, 1795 18 years
(215 months)
15 15 Kentucky, Vermont May 1, 1795July 3, 1818 23 years
(278 months)
20 13 Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi,
Ohio, Tennessee
July 4, 1818July 3, 1819 1 year
(12 months)
21 13 Illinois July 4, 1819July 3, 1820 1 year
(12 months)
23 13 Alabama, Maine July 4, 1820July 3, 1822 2 years
(24 months)
24 13 Missouri July 4, 1822July 3, 1836 14 years
(168 months)
25 13 Arkansas July 4, 1836July 3, 1837 1 year
(12 months)
26 13 Michigan July 4, 1837July 3, 1845 8 years
(96 months)
27 13 Florida July 4, 1845July 3, 1846 1 year
(12 months)
28 13 Texas July 4, 1846July 3, 1847 1 year
(12 months)
29 13 Iowa July 4, 1847July 3, 1848 1 year
(12 months)
30 13 Wisconsin July 4, 1848July 3, 1851 3 years
(36 months)
31 13 California July 4, 1851July 3, 1858 7 years
(84 months)
32 13 Minnesota July 4, 1858July 3, 1859 1 year
(12 months)
33 13 Oregon July 4, 1859July 3, 1861 2 years
(24 months)
34 13 Kansas July 4, 1861July 3, 1863 2 years
(24 months)
35 13 West Virginia July 4, 1863July 3, 1865 2 years
(24 months)
36 13 Nevada July 4, 1865July 3, 1867 2 years
(24 months)
37 13 Nebraska July 4, 1867July 3, 1877 10 years
(120 months)
38 13 Colorado July 4, 1877July 3, 1890 13 years
(156 months)
43 13 Idaho, Montana, North Dakota,
South Dakota, Washington
July 4, 1890July 3, 1891 1 year
(12 months)
44 13 Wyoming July 4, 1891July 3, 1896 5 years
(60 months)
45 13 Utah July 4, 1896July 3, 1908 12 years
(144 months)
46 13 Oklahoma July 4, 1908July 3, 1912 4 years
(48 months)
48 13 Arizona, New Mexico July 4, 1912July 3, 1959 47 years
(564 months)
49 13 Alaska July 4, 1959July 3, 1960 1 year
(12 months)
50 13 Hawaii July 4, 1960present 48 years
( 599 months as of May 2008)

Image File history File links Grand_Union_Flag. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_13_stars_–_Betsy_Ross. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_15_stars. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_20_stars. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... Image File history File links US_flag_21_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1819 (MDCCCXIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) in the [[Grhttp://en. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_23_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_24_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_25_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_26_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_27_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Florida. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_28_stars. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_29_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_30_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_31_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_32_stars. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_33_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_34_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_35_stars. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Demonym West Virginian Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st in the US  - Total 24,230 sq mi (62,755 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_36_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_37_stars. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_38_stars. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_43_stars. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Dakotan Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th in the US  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Demonym South Dakotan Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th in the US  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_44_stars. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_45_stars. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_46_stars. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Image File history File links US_flag_48_stars. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links US_flag_49_stars. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Present may mean: present (time): time that is neither past nor future a gift: thing given free of charge, gratis This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Future of the flag

See also: 51st state

The United States Army Institute of Heraldry has plans for flags with up to 56 stars, using a similar staggered star arrangement should additional states accede. There are political movements supporting statehood in Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, among other areas. This article is about a hypothetical U.S. state. ... The Institute of Heraldry Insignia The United States Army Institute of Heraldry furnishes heraldic services to the U.S. Armed Forces and other United States government organizations, including the Executive Office of the President. ... This is a list of U.S. state secession proposals; that is, a list of official or otherwise noteworthy proposals for dividing existing U.S. states into multiple states. ...

United States 51-star flag (proposed by U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry)
United States 51-star flag (proposed by U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry)
United States 51-star flag (proposed by New Progressive Party of Puerto Rico)
United States 51-star flag (proposed by New Progressive Party of Puerto Rico)

Image File history File links US_flag_51_stars. ... Image File history File links US_51-star_alternate_flag. ... For other uses, see New Progressive Party (disambiguation). ...

Non-standard flags

Guilford Court House Flag
A number of non-standard flags appeared in the early years of American independence. One example is the design approximated here, of a flag traditionally believed to have been carried by the American troops at the Battle of Guilford Court House in 1781. This is disputed by some other historians who think it dates to the nineteenth century. The original flag is at the North Carolina Historical Museum.


Guilford Courthouse flag The Guilford Courthouse flag is the name given to a North Carolina militia banner which was reported to have flown at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. ... Combatants United States Britain Commanders Nathanael Greene Lord Cornwallis Strength 4,400 1,900 Casualties 79 killed 185 wounded 1,046 missing Total: 1,310 93 killed 413 wounded 26 missing Total: 532 The Battle of Guilford Court House was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present...


Similar flags

See also: Flags of the United States
Flag of Liberia
Flag of Liberia
Flag of Malaysia
Flag of Malaysia
Flag of Hawaii
Flag of Hawaii
Amazonas (Brazilian state)
Amazonas (Brazilian state)
Flag of Ohio
Flag of Ohio
Flag of Georgia
Flag of Georgia
Maranhão (Brazilian state)
Maranhão (Brazilian state)
Piauí (Brazilian state)
Piauí (Brazilian state)

The flag of Liberia bears a close resemblance, showing the ex–American-slave origin of the country. The Liberian flag has similar red and white stripes, though only 11 of them, as well as a blue square for the union, but with only a single large white star. This is a list of flags used in or otherwise associated with the United States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Liberia. ... Flag ratio: 10:19~ The Liberian flag bears close resemblance to the flag of the United States, showing the ex–American slave origins of the country. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Malaysia. ... National flag and state ensign. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii, is the official standard symbolizing Hawaii as a kingdom (under a short British annexation), protectorate, republic, territory and state. ... Image File history File links Bandeira_do_Amazonas. ... Capital (and largest city) Manaus Demonym Amazonense Government  -  Governor Eduardo Braga  -  Vice Governor Omar José Abdel Aziz Area  -  Total 1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ohio. ... The flag of Ohio was adopted in 1902 and designed by John Eisemann. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Georgia_(U.S._state). ... Current State flag of Georgia The current flag of Georgia was adopted on May 8, 2003. ... Image File history File links Bandeira_do_Maranhão. ... Maranhão is one of the states of Brazil in the north-eastern region. ... Image File history File links Bandeira_do_Piauí.svg Bandeira do Piauí. This image shows a flag, a coat of arms, a seal or some other official insignia. ... Capital (and largest city) Teresina Demonym Piauiense Government  -  Governor Wellington Dias  -  Vice Governor Wilson Martins Area  -  Total 251. ... Flag ratio: 10:19~ The Liberian flag bears close resemblance to the flag of the United States, showing the ex–American slave origins of the country. ...


The flag of Malaysia also has a striking resemblance, with red and white stripes (14 total), and a blue canton, but displaying instead of stars a star and crescent emblem. This might be due, however, to the great influence of the British East India Company, rather than the later United States flag National flag and state ensign. ... A typical presentation of the star and crescent The star and crescent is a symbol consisting of a crescent with a star at the concave side. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ...


The flag of Hawaii, in use since it was a kingdom in the 19th century, with eight stripes in red, white, and blue, and the British Union Flag in the canton, has some resemblance to the U.S. Grand Union Flag of the 18th century. Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii, is the official standard symbolizing Hawaii as a kingdom (under a short British annexation), protectorate, republic, territory and state. ... Union Jack redirects here. ...


The flag of Amazonas was adopted by law No. 1513 of January 14, 1982. The 25 stars in the topleft corner represent the 25 municipalities which existed on August 4, 1897. The bigger star represents the capital Manaus. The two horizontal white bars represent hope, while the red bar in the middle represents the struggles overcome. Amazonas is the name of four subnational entities in various South American nations. ...


The flag of Ohio was adopted in 1902 and designed by John Eisemann. The large blue triangle represent Ohio's hills and valleys, and the stripes represent roads and waterways. 17 stars symbolize that Ohio was the 17th state admitted to the union. The white circle with its red center not only represents the first letter of the state name, but also its nickname "the Buckeye State". The flag of Ohio was adopted in 1902 and designed by John Eisemann. ...


The flag of Georgia was adopted on May 8, 2003. The flag has three red and white stripes, with the state coat of arms (taken from the state seal) on a blue field in the upper left corner. In the coat of arms, the arch symbolizes the state's Constitution and the pillars represent the three branches of government: legislative, executive, and judicial. The words of the state motto, "Wisdom, Justice, Moderation," are wrapped around the pillars, guarded by a male figure dressed in Colonial attire like a soldier of the War of Independence, with a drawn sword representing the defense of the Constitution. An additional motto, In God We Trust, appears under these elements, though it is not part of the state seal nor coat of arms. The flag has thirteen stars, representing Georgia and the 12 other original states that formed the United States of America. The Flag of Georgia can refer to: Flag of Georgia (country) Flag of Georgia (U.S. state) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The flag of Piaui was created on 24 July 1922. The blue canton and a star represents the state itself and the green and yellow bars represent Piauí's union with Brazil. Piauí is one of the states of Brazil, located in the northeastern part of the country, in the arid region of Sertão. ...

Flag of Chile
Flag of Chile
Flag of Texas
Flag of Texas
Flag of Cuba
Flag of Cuba
Flag of Puerto Rico
Flag of Puerto Rico

Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... The flag of Chile consists of two equal horizontal bands of white (top) and red; there is a blue square the same height as the white band at the hoist-side end of the white band; the square bears a white five-pointed star in the center representing a guide... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... Flag of Texas The flag of Texas is defined by law as follows: The flag is known as the Lone Star Flag (giving Texas its nickname of the Lone Star State). This flag was introduced to the Congress of the Republic of Texas on December 28, 1838, by Senator William... Image File history File links Flag_of_Cuba. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of Cuba was adopted on May 20, 1902. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Puerto_Rico. ... Flag of Puerto Rico (1995 - present) Flag of Puerto Rico (1952 - 1995) Pro-independence Flag (1892) The Flag of Puerto Rico was designed in 1894. ...

Bahia (Brazilian state)
Bahia (Brazilian state)
Flag of Mississippi
Flag of Mississippi
Goiás (Brazilian state)
Goiás (Brazilian state)

The flags of Chile and of Texas have similar simplified designs, each with a single red and white stripe, and a "lone star" in the canton. Image File history File links Bandeira_da_Bahia. ... Capital (and largest city) Salvador Demonym Baiano Government  -  Governor Jacques Wagner  -  Vice Governor Edmundo Pereira Santos Area  -  Total 564. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mississippi. ... Flag of Mississippi from 1894-present 1861 flag The flag of Mississippi echoes the Confederate Stars and Bars flag and the Confederate battle flag. ... Image File history File links Bandeira_de_Goiás. ... Capital (and largest city) Goiânia Demonym Goiano Government  -  Governor Alcides Rodrigues  -  Vice Governor Ademir Menezes Area  -  Total 340. ... Flag of Texas The flag of Texas is defined by law as follows: The flag is known as the Lone Star Flag (giving Texas its nickname of the Lone Star State). This flag was introduced to the Congress of the Republic of Texas on December 28, 1838, by Senator William...


Today's Chile flag was conceived by Bernardo O'Higgins's Minister of War José Ignacio Zenteno and designed by Antonio Arcos, although some claim that is was Gregorio de Andía y Varela who drew it.


Though more dissimilar in appearance, the flag of Cuba was also inspired by the flag of the United States. Its origins date from 1849, when Cuban liberation movements emerged among Cuban exiles in the U.S.[22] Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of Cuba was adopted on May 20, 1902. ...


Another flag design tied to that of the U.S. flag is the flag of Puerto Rico. There are specific shades of red and blue for the construction of the flag, however there might be slight variations depending on the flag-flyer's political beliefs. The pro-independence groups use sky blue, while the pro-statehood groups use a darker shade of blue more similar to that of the U.S. flag. The official version uses an intermediate shade, so as not to take sides. Flag of Puerto Rico (1995 - present) Flag of Puerto Rico (1952 - 1995) Pro-independence Flag (1892) The Flag of Puerto Rico was designed in 1894. ... Politics of Puerto Rico takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic system, whereby the Governor of Puerto Rico is head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Categories: Stub | Colors ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of...


The green bars in the flag of Goiás symbolize the spring and the yellow bars gold. The blue rectangle in the topleft corner symbolizes the sky, with the five stars forming the constellation of the Southern Cross. The flag was adopted on July 30, 1919. It is a toned down version of the original Republican flag of Brazil, in itself not original. Capital (and largest city) Goiânia Demonym Goiano Government  -  Governor Alcides Rodrigues  -  Vice Governor Ademir Menezes Area  -  Total 340. ...


See also

National flag and ensign of the United States, 1960–Present. ... This is a list of flags used in or otherwise associated with the United States. ... The flags of the U.S. states exhibit a wide variety of regional influences and local histories, as well as widely different styles and design principles. ... The several branches of the United States armed forces are represented by flags, among other emblems and insignia. ... The Confederate States of America used several flags during its existence from 1861 to 1865. ... The jack of the United States is a maritime flag representing United States nationality flown on the jackstaff in the bow of its vessels. ... Old Glory is a common nickname for the Flag of the United States, bestowed by William Driver, an early 19th century American sea captain. ... The Gadsden Flag The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag with a yellow field depicting a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. ... The Flag of the United States The United States is generally considered to be a nation-state[], although supporters of American exceptionalism may prefer to see it as a unique type of state. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: United States Flag Code The United States Flag Code establishes advisory rules for display and care of the American Flag. ... Hoa Kỳ is the alternative name of United States of America in Vietnamese. ...

Article sections

  • Flag desecration: United States
  • Colors, standards and guidons: United States

Burning the Flag of the United States Flag desecration is a blanket term applied to various acts that intentionally deface a flag, most often a national flag (though other flags can be defaced as well). ... // Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ...

Associated people

Francis Julius Bellamy (May 18, 1855 - August 28, 1931) was an American Baptist minister, a graduate of the University of Rochester where he was a brother of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, and a Christian Socialist; he composed the original Pledge of Allegiance for the Boston-based Youths Companion... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States and the its national flag. ... William Driver (1803 - 1886) was a U.S. ship captain. ... Old Glory is a common nickname for the Flag of the United States, bestowed by William Driver, an early 19th century American sea captain. ... Charles Fawcett was a British historian. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... Heroes stamp using the Thomas E. Franklin photo Thomas E. Franklin (born 1966) is a photographer for the Bergen Record who photographed the iconic Ground Zero Spirit photo depicting firefighters raising the flag at the World Trade Center. ... Raising the Flag at Ground Zero Raising the Flag at Ground Zero is a photograph by Thomas E. Franklin of The Bergen Record, taken on September 11, 2001. ... Christopher Gadsden (1724-1805) was an American general and statesman during the American Revolution. ... The Gadsden Flag The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag with a yellow field depicting a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. ... Robert G. Heft is the designer of the 50-star flag, and the proposed 51-star flag for the United States of America. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... Francis Hopkinson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Jasper Johnss Map, 1961 Jasper Johnss Flag, Encaustic, oil and collage on fabric mounted on plywood,1954-55 Detail of Flag (1954-55). ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... Grand Union flag North Carolina Currency, 1776 Painting of flag of East India Company, 1732 The Grand Union Flag, also known as the Congress flag, the First Navy Ensign, The Cambridge Flag, and The Continental Colors is the first true Flag of the United States. ... Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur... The Star Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States. ... Mary Young Pickersgill Mary Young Pickersgill (1776-1857) is the flagmaker of the famous banner hoisted over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore in the War of 1812. ... Fort McHenry Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812, when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in Chesapeake Bay. ... Combatants Great Britain United States of America Commanders Robert Ross† Alexander Cochrane Arthur Brooke Samuel Smith John Stricker George Armistead Strength 5,000 2,000 (Baltimore defenses) 1,000 (Fort McHenry garrison) Casualties 46 dead, 300 wounded 310 killed or wounded In the Battle of Baltimore, one of the turning... Katha Pollitt (born 1949) is an American feminist writer. ... George Henry Preble (25 February 1816 - 1 March 1885) was an American naval officer and writer, notable for his history of the flag of the United States and for taking the first photograph of the Fort Henry flag that inspired The Star-Spangled Banner. ... With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... For other persons named Betsy Boss, see Betsy Boss (disambiguation). ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...

References

  • Allentown Art Museum. The American Flag in the Art of Our Country. Allentown Art Museum, 1976.
  • Herbert Ridgeway Collins. Threads of History: Americana Recorded on Cloth 1775 to the Present. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1979.
  • Grace Rogers Cooper. Thirteen-star Flags: Keys to Identification. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1973.
  • David D. Crouthers. Flags of American History. Hammond, 1978.
  • Louise Lawrence Devine. The Story of Our Flag. Rand McNally, 1960.
  • William Rea Furlong, Byron McCandless, and Harold D. Langley. So Proudly We Hail: The History of the United States Flag. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1981.
  • Scot M. Guenter, The American Flag, 1777-1924: Cultural Shifts from Creation to Codification. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. 1990. online
  • Marc Leepson, Flag: An American Biography. Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press, 2005.
  • David Roger Manwaring. Render Unto Caesar: The Flag-Salute Controversy. University of Chicago Press, 1962.
  • Boleslaw Mastai and Marie-Louise D'Otrange Mastai. The Stars and the Stripes: The American Flag as Art and as History from the Birth of the Republic to the Present. Knopf, 1973.
  • Milo Milton Quaife. The Flag of the United States. 1942.
  • Milo Milton Quaife, Melvin J. Weig, and Roy Applebaum. The History of the United States Flag, from the Revolution to the Present, Including a Guide to Its Use and Display. Harper, 1961.
  • Albert M. Rosenblatt. "Flag Desecration Statutes: History and Analysis," Washington University Law Quarterly 1972: 193-237.
  • Leonard A. Stevens. Salute! The Case of The Bible vs. The Flag. Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1973.

Marc Leepson Marc Leepson (born June 20, 1945 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American journalist, historian, and author. ...

Notes

  1. ^ States are represented collectively; there is no meaning to particular stars nor stripes.
  2. ^ Coined by Captain William Driver, a nineteenth century shipmaster.
  3. ^ No relation to the Union Flag of the United Kingdom to which this term more commonly refers.
  4. ^ What do the colors of the Flag mean?. USFlag.org: A website dedicated to the Flag of the United States of America. Retrieved on June 14, 2005.
  5. ^ The United States Flag - Public and Intergovernmental Affairs. United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved on December 7, 2006.
  6. ^ The Pantone color equivalents for Old Glory Blue and Red are listed on U.S. Flag Facts at the U.S. Embassy's London site.
  7. ^ The RGB color values are taken from the Pantone Color Finder at Pantone.com.
  8. ^ Robert G. Heft: Designer of America's Current National Flag. USFlag.org: A website dedicated to the Flag of the United States of America. Retrieved on December 7, 2006.
  9. ^ Fringe on the American Flag. Retrieved on June 27, 2006.
  10. ^ London Olympics 1908 & 1948
  11. ^ [1][dead link]
  12. ^ Patriot Day, 2005
  13. ^ a b Leepson, Marc. (2005). Flag: An American Biography. New York: St. Martin's Press. p. 16.
  14. ^ The STRIPED FLAG of the EAST INDIA COMPANY, and its CONNEXION with the AMERICAN "STARS and STRIPES" at Flags of the World
  15. ^ East India Company (United Kingdom) at Flags of the World
  16. ^ Guenter (1990)
  17. ^ Federal Citizen Information Center. [2] Accessed 11 April 2008.
  18. ^ Embassy of the United States of America [3] Accessed 11 April 2008.
  19. ^ Mastai, 60
  20. ^ United States Government (1861). Our Flag (PDF), Washington DC: United States Government Printing Office. S. Doc 105-013. 
  21. ^ (For alternate versions of the flag of the United States, see the Stars of the U.S. Flag page at the Flags of the World website.)
    Further information: Territorial evolution of the United States
  22. ^ Cuba at Flags of the World

William Driver (1803 - 1886) was a U.S. ship captain. ... Union Jack redirects here. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the corporation and its color space. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ... Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ... Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ... This is a list of the evolution of the borders of the United States. ... Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ...

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Flags of the United States
This is a list of countries spanning more than one continent. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas in an equal-area projection The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... This article is about the theme park. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 534 pixelsFull resolution (1776 × 1185 pixel, file size: 198 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Spanish Flag redirects here. ... Image File history File links Pavillon_royal_de_France. ... The national flag of France (known in French as drapeau tricolore, drapeau bleu-blanc-rouge, drapeau français, rarely, le tricolore and, in military parlance, les couleurs) is a tricolour featuring three vertical bands coloured blue (hoist side), white, and red. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico_(1823-1864,_1867-1968). ... eat icecream The Flag of the United Mexican States or Mexico is a vertical tricolor of green, white, and red with the national coat of arms charged in the center of the white stripe. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... Flag of Texas The flag of Texas is defined by law as follows: The flag is known as the Lone Star Flag (giving Texas its nickname of the Lone Star State). This flag was introduced to the Congress of the Republic of Texas on December 28, 1838, by Senator William... Image File history File links CSA_FLAG_4. ... The Confederate States of America used several flags during its existence from 1861 to 1865. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... This gallery of sovereign-state flags shows the flags of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview contains the flags of dependent territories. ... This article is intended as a list of flags from micronations - that is, unrecognised statelike entities that are largely or wholly ephemeral in nature. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... This gallery of sovereign state coats of arms shows the coat of arms of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview shows the coat of arms of dependent territories. ... This overview contains the coats of arms of self-proclaimed states that have declared their independence, exert control over (at least part of) the claimed territory and population, but have not been acknowledged as independent states by the international community at large. ... This overview contains the coats of arms of micronations, self-proclaimed statelike entities that are largely or wholly ephemeral in nature. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Flag of the United States - MSN Encarta (1572 words)
The flag of the United States of America consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing 50...
A favorite emblematic device in the flags of the southern colonies was a rattlesnake, usually depicted as coiled and ready to strike and having 13 rattles.
The word was inscribed on an otherwise plain red flag raised in New York by the Sons of Liberty, a secret patriotic organization, in defiance of a British regulation forbidding the display of any but the British flag.
NSSAR - United States Flag Act (2600 words)
State and local regulations: Flag regulations of State Commission of Education determining material and size of flag, manner and place of display, care of flag and pledge to the flag are constitutional and do not contravene either United States Constitution or New York State Constitution.
The flag, when carried in a procession with another flag or flags, should be either on the marching right; that is, the flag's own right, or, if there is a line of other flags, in front of the center of that line.
By order of the President, the flag shall be flown at half-staff upon the death of principal figures of the United States Government and the Governor of a State, territory, or possession, as a mark of respect to their memory.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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