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Encyclopedia > Flag of Northern Ireland
The Union Flag is flown from government buildings in Northern Ireland.
The Union Flag is flown from government buildings in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland has not had its own unique, government sanctioned flag since its government was prorogued in 1972, and abolished in 1973 under the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973. During official events, the British government uses the Union Flag which is the official flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Image File history File links Merge-arrows. ... // The Northern Ireland flags issue is one that divides the population along sectarian lines. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: ) is a part of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... A prorogation is the period between two sessions of a legislative body. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... The Northern Ireland Constitution Act was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1973 to replace the previous system established by the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


The Ulster Banner remains in use by Unionists, a number of sporting organisations in Northern Ireland and some local government authorities under Unionist control.[1] Flag of Northern Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In the Irish context, Unionists form a group of largely (though not exclusively) Protestant people in Ireland, of all social classes, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which the Northern Ireland provincial state created in...

Contents

The Flag of the Former Government of Northern Ireland (1953-1972)

Main article: Ulster Banner
The Ulster Banner - used officially by the former government of Northern Ireland (1953-1972)
The Flag of 9-county Ulster province in Ireland
The Flag of 9-county Ulster province in Ireland

The "Ulster Banner" is the official name[citation needed] that was given to the flag, which can be referred to as "the flag of Northern Ireland", the "Northern Ireland flag", the "Red Hand Flag" or as the "Ulster Flag" (not to be confused with the provincial Flag of Ulster). The Ulster Banner was the official flag that was used to represent the Government of Northern Ireland from 1953 to 1973. In common with other British flags, any civic status of the flag was not defined in a de jure manner.[2] Flag of Northern Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Northern_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Northern_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ulster. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ulster. ... Red Hand redirects here. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... The Flag of Ulster The Flag of Ulster, one of the four provinces of Ireland, consists of a red cross on a golden field (from the arms of Norman coloniser, John de Courcy), charged with a white shield and the red hand. ... The Parliament Buildings of Northern Ireland The Executive Committee met there. ...


In 1924, the Government of Northern Ireland was granted arms by Royal Warrant and had the right to display these arms on a flag or banner. This right was exercised for the Coronation in 1953. Between 1953 and 1972, this flag was the arms of the Government of Northern Ireland. It ceased to have official government sanction when the Parliament of Northern Ireland was dissolved by the British government under the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973, but remains the only flag to date which represents Northern Ireland at international level in sport.[2][3][4] and the flag of the province of Ulster,[5] with the addition of a crown to symbolise the loyalty of Ulster unionists to the British Monarchy.[citation needed] As with the flag of the province of Ulster, it contains the Red Hand of Ulster at the centre. There is a dispute as to the meaning of the star, with some maintaining it is the Star of David, and others say it represents the six counties that make up Northern Ireland. For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Coat of Arms of Northern Ireland The Coat of Arms of Northern Ireland was granted to the Government of Northern Ireland in 1924, after the Irish Free State had separated from the United Kingdom. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... The Parliament of Northern Ireland was the home rule legislature created under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, which existed from June 7, 1921 to March 30, 1972, when it was suspended. ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... The Northern Ireland Constitution Act was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, passed in 1973 to replace the previous system established by the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... Red Hand redirects here. ... This article is about a Jewish symbol. ...


The flag is used within the unionist community, along with the Union Flag. A variation of the flag places the Union Flag in the Canton, and defaced with the red hand and the outline of a map of Northern Ireland on the Union Flag. It is regularly displayed by fans of the Northern Ireland national football team. It is also used to represent Northern Ireland at the Commonwealth Games, the Northern Ireland national football team. In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... For the Irish FAs all-Ireland international team, see Ireland national football team (IFA). ... Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ... For the Irish FAs all-Ireland international team, see Ireland national football team (IFA). ...


Displaying flags

The Irish Tricolour, flown by nationalists in support of a united Ireland
The Irish Tricolour, flown by nationalists in support of a united Ireland

In Northern Ireland, some members from each 'community' use their own flags to declare their allegiance (to political ideology) and 'mark territory', often in a manner that is deliberately provocative. Thus it is the "Ulster Banner" and the Union Flag that are flown by unionists,[citation needed] while the Irish tricolour of the Republic of Ireland is often used to represent nationalist allegiance to The Republic of Ireland.[citation needed] They argue that the Irish tricolour is a symbol of peace and unity, not just of Ireland, but of the two distinct peoples within the island, those being the Roman Catholic Irish (Green) and the Protestant Unionist traditions (Orange) being united by peace (White). Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... The national flag of the Republic of Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ... The national flag of the Republic of Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... The national flag of the Republic of Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ...


Under the 1998 Belfast Agreement, flags continue to be a source of disagreement in Northern Ireland. The Agreement states that: The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ...

All participants acknowledge the sensitivity of the use of symbols and emblems for public purposes, and the need in particular in creating the new institutions to ensure that such symbols and emblems are used in a manner which promotes mutual respect rather than division.

Belfast Agreement The Belfast Agreement (also known as the Good Friday Agreement and, more rarely, as the Stormont Agreement) was a major political development in the Northern Ireland peace process. ...

Nationalists pointed to this to argue that the use of the Union Flag for official purposes should be restricted, or that the Irish tricolour should be flown alongside the British flag on government buildings, and banned the Union Flag from the public buildings they were in charge of during the last previous devolved administration.[6] However all signatories to the Agreement also declare their acceptance of the "principle of consent" (i.e. that there will be no change to the constitutional position of Northern Ireland unless a majority votes for it), and Unionists argued that this provision amounts to recognising that the Union Flag is the only legitimate official flag in Northern Ireland.[citation needed] The problem was discussed in detail and various proposals made including suggestions for a new flag.[7]


The dispute was resolved by legislation requiring the Union Flag to be flown over specified government buildings including Parliament Buildings and state offices on specified 'named days' (honouring, for example Queen Elizabeth II's official birthday), and prohibiting other flags save the European Union flag. On the occasion of a visit to a government building by the United Kingdom head of state the Royal Standard shall be flown and the Union Flag can be flown, and on state visits from other heads of state the Union Flag and the national flag of the country of the visitor can be flown.[8] The legislation does not apply to District Council buildings, and District Councils follow a range of practices varying from flying the Union Flag on a number of council buildings every day of the year as at Lisburn, to flying no flags on any building, flying only the council flag or flying flags on the designated days in the same way as government buildings.[9] Northern Ireland Parliament Buildings Parliament Buildings, known as Stormont because of its location in the Stormont area of Belfast, served as the seat of the Parliament of Northern Ireland and successive Northern Ireland assemblies and conventions. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Lisburn UK Parliament: Lagan Valley European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: (+44) 02892 Post Town: Lisburn Postal District(s): BT27, BT28 Population (2001) 71,465 Website: www. ...


A new flag?

Although the idea of a new flag for Northern Ireland has been discussed from time to time, it has little popular support,[citation needed] as some unionists and loyalists do not wish to see Northern Ireland's links with Britain and the Crown undermined. Similarly, many nationalists and republicans do not recognise Northern Ireland as a viable separate entity, and therefore, see no reason for it to have any symbols. // The Northern Ireland flags issue is one that divides the population along sectarian lines. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Unionists (Ireland). ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... Irish republicanism is an ideology based on the Irish nationalist belief that all of Ireland should be a single independent republic, whether as a unitary state, a federal state or as a confederal arrangement. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.uefa.com/footballeurope/countries/association=63/index.html
  2. ^ a b Encyclopdeia Britannica says: According to British tradition, a coat of arms or flag is granted to the government of a territory, not to the people residing there. Therefore, when the government of Northern Ireland was disbanded in March 1972, its arms and flag officially disappeared; however, the flag continues to be used by groups (such as sports teams) representing the territory in an unofficial manner in sport.
  3. ^ http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/images/symbols/flags.htm
  4. ^ http://www.flagsonline.it/asp/fahne.asp/fahne_Nordirland/Nordirland.html
  5. ^ http://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/gb-ni.html#hist
  6. ^ Tension over flag flying at BBC News
  7. ^ Flagging concern: the controversy over flags and emblems
  8. ^ The Flags Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2000
  9. ^ Transforming Conflict: Flags and Emblems by Dominic Bryan and Gordon Gillespie, Institute of Irish Studies, Queen's University, Belfast, March 2005

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
EZGeography - Northern Ireland (4029 words)
Northern Ireland is an administrative region and one of four constituent parts of the United Kingdom.
Northern Ireland was covered by an ice sheet for most of the last ice age and on numerous previous occasions, the legacy of which can be seen in the extensive coverage of drumlins in Counties Fermanagh, Armagh, Antrim and particularly Down.
The Ireland Act 1949 gave the first legal guarantee to the Parliament and Government that Northern Ireland would not cease to be part of the United Kingdom without consent of the majority of its citizens, this was most recently reaffirmed by the Northern Ireland Act 1998.
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A yellow flag with a red cross, bearing a white shield charged with the red hand of Ulster, is a banner of the arms of the traditional province of Ulster.
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