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Encyclopedia > Flag of Japan
Flag of Japan
Flag of Japan
Names Nisshōki ("Sun Flag"), Hinomaru ("Sun Disc")
Use Civil and state flag and ensign.
Proportion 2:3
Adopted February 27, 1870 (civil ensign)
August 13, 1999 (national flag)
Design A red disc on a white field.
Designed by Nichiren (according to legend)

The national flag of Japan, known as Nisshōki (日章旗 "sun flag") or Hinomaru (日の丸 "sun disc") in Japanese, is a base white flag with a large red disc (representing the rising sun) in the center. A legend says that its origins lie in the days of the Mongol invasions of Japan in the 13th century, when the Buddhist priest Nichiren was supposed to have offered the sun disc flag to the Emperor of Japan, who was considered a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu. In fact the sun disc symbol is known to have been displayed on folding fans carried in the 12th century by samurai involved in the feud between the Taira and Minamoto clans. It was widely used on military banners in the Sengoku ("Warring States") period of the 15th and 16th centuries. On August 7, 1854, shortly after commerce was opened with the West, the Hinomaru was established as the official flag to be flown from Japanese ships. Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... This is an incomplete list of names used for specific flags, either as officially designated titles or traditional nicknames. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... It has been suggested that the section intro from the article Civil flag be merged into this article or section. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... Image File history File links FIAV_110110. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... It has been suggested that the section intro from the article Civil flag be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Honorary guard of Mongolia. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282), born Zennichimaro (善日麿), later Zeshō-bō Renchō (是生房蓮長), and finally Nichiren (日蓮), was a Buddhist monk of 13th century Japan. ... For the CPR ocean liner, see Empress of Japan. ... The Sun goddess emerging out of a cave, bringing sunlight back to the universe. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... Taira (平) is a Japanese surname. ... Minamoto (源) was an honorary surname bestowed by the Emperors of Japan of the Heian Period to their sons and grandsons after accepting them as royal subjects. ... “Sengoku” redirects here. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


By the time of the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the sun disc design had come to be regarded as the de facto national flag, and it was officially adopted for use as the civil ensign by Proclamation No. 57 on February 27, 1870 (27 Jan Meiji 3). However, it was not formally adopted as the national flag until August 13, 1999 by Proclamation No. 127. The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... The civil ensign (a. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Japans Law Concerning the National Flag and Anthem (国旗及び国歌に関する法律, kokki oyobi kokka ni kan suru hōritsu) or Proclamation No. ...

Contents

Design

Construction sheet

When the Prime Minister's Proclamation No. 57 was passed in 1870, there was two provisions of it. The first provision dealt with who flies and how it is flown, the second dealt with how the flag is to be made. The ratio, according to the proclamation, is going to be seven units high and ten units wide (7:10). The red disc, which represents the sun, is calculated to be three-fifths of the total size of the hoist length. The disc is decreed to be in the center, but is usually placed one-hundredths (1/100) towards the hoist.[1][2] Image File history File links Construction_sheet_of_the_Japanese_flag. ... Image File history File links Construction_sheet_of_the_Japanese_flag. ...


When the new flag law was passed on 13 August 1999, the dimensions of the flag were altered slightly. The overall ratio of the flag was changed to two units length by three units width (2:3). The red disc was shifted towards dead center, but the overall size of the disc stayed the same.[2] The background of the flag is white and the sun disc is red, but the exact color shades were not defined in the 1999 law.[2] However, the 2000 edition of Album des pavillons suggest the sun disc is Pantone 186; the white field is not mentioned.[3] is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Album des pavillons, short for the Album des pavillons nationaux et des marques distinctive, is a flag book published by the French Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine. ...


Military

Naval Ensign
Naval Ensign
For a list of military flags, see List of Japanese flags: Military.

The Japan Self-Defense Forces and the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force use a version of the sun disc design with 8 red rays extending outward, called Hachijō-Kyokujitsuki (八条旭日旗). A gold border lies partially around the edge.[4] Image File history File links Flag_of_JSDF.svg ファイルの概要 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of Japan Japan Self-Defense Forces ... Image File history File links Flag_of_JSDF.svg ファイルの概要 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of Japan Japan Self-Defense Forces ... The Japan Self-Defense Forces ), or JSDF, are the military forces in Japan that were established after the end of World War II. The force has not been engaged in real combat but has been engaged in some international peacekeeping operations. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_Japan. ... Image File history File links Naval_Ensign_of_Japan. ... This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... The Japan Self-Defense Forces ), or JSDF, are the military forces in Japan that were established after the end of World War II. The force has not been engaged in real combat but has been engaged in some international peacekeeping operations. ... The flag of Japan Ground Self-Defense Force The Japanese Ground Self-Defense Force ), or JGSDF, is the name of the military ground forces (army) of Japan. ...


A very well known variant of the sun disc design is the sun disc with 16 red rays, which was also historically used by Japan's military, particularly the Imperial Japanese Navy. It was first adopted as the naval ensign on October 7, 1889 and was used until the end of World War II in 1945. It was re-adopted on June 30, 1954 and is now used again as Japan's naval ensign, used by the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force. In the surrounding Asian countries which were occupied by Japan this flag still carries a negative connotation.[5] The JMSDF also employs the use of a masthead pennant. First adopted in 1914 and readopted in 1965, the masthead pennant contains a simplified version of the naval ensign at the hoist end, with the rest of the pennant colored white. The ratio of the pennant is between 1:40 and 1:90.[6] For Combined Fleet, please see that article. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ), or JMSDF, is the maritime branch of the Japanese Self-Defense Forces, tasked with the naval defense of Japan and formed following the dissolution of the Imperial Japanese Navy after World War II.[1] The force is based strictly on defensive armament, largely lacking... The Commissioning pennant or Masthead pennant is a pennant (also spelt pendant) flown from the masthead of a warship. ...


The Japan Air Self-Defense Force, established independently in 1952, has only the plain sun disc as its emblem. This is the only branch of service whose emblem does not invoke the rayed Imperial Standard. However, the branch does have an ensign to fly on bases and during parades. The ensign was created in 1972, which was the third used by the JASDF since their creation. The ensign contains the emblem of the branch centered on a blue background.[7] The Japan Air Self-Defense Force ), or JASDF, is the aviation branch of the Japan Self-Defense Forces responsible for the defense of Japanese airspace and other aerospace operations. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Imperial

For a list of imperial flags, see List of Japanese flags: Imperial.
The Standard of the Japanese emperor
The Standard of the Japanese emperor

Starting in 1869, flags were created for the Japanese emperor, his wife (the empress), and for other members of the imperial family. At first, the emperor's flag was ornate, with a sun resting in the center of an artistic pattern. He had flags that were used on land, at sea, and when he was in a carriage. The imperial family were also granted flags to be used at sea and while on land (one for use on foot and a carriage flag). The carriage flags were a monocolored chrysanthemum, with 16 petals, placed in the center of a monocolored background.[8] These flags were discarded in 1889 when the emperor decided to use the chrysanthemum on a red background as his flag. With minor changes in the color shades and proportions, the flags adopted in 1889 are still being used by the imperial family.[9] This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Japanese_Emperor. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Japanese_Emperor. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Species Chrysanthemum aphrodite Chrysanthemum arcticum Chrysanthemum argyrophyllum Chrysanthemum arisanense Chrysanthemum boreale Chrysanthemum chalchingolicum Chrysanthemum chanetii Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium Chrysanthemum crassum Chrysanthemum glabriusculum Chrysanthemum hypargyrum Chrysanthemum indicum Chrysanthemum japonense Chrysanthemum japonicum Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium Chrysanthemum mawii Chrysanthemum maximowiczii Chrysanthemum mongolicum Chrysanthemum morifolium Chrysanthemum morii Chrysanthemum okiense Chrysanthemum oreastrum Chrysanthemum ornatum Chrysanthemum pacificum Chrysanthemum... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The current emperor's flag is a 16-petal chrysanthemum, colored in gold, centered on a red background with a 2:3 ratio. The empress uses the same flag, except the shape is that of a swallow tail. The crown prince and the crown princess use the same flags, except with a smaller chrysanthemum and a white border in the middle of the flags.[10]


Subnational

The prefectural flag of Nagano
The flag of Yokohama-shi
The flag of Yokohama-shi
For a list of prefectural flags, see List of Japanese flags: Prefectural.
For a list of municipal flags, see List of Japanese flags: Municipal.

Each of Japan's 47 prefectures has its own flag. Each resembles the national flag insofar as consisting of a symbol, called a mon, charged on a monocolored field. Some of the mon display the name of the prefecture in katakana characters; others are stylized depictions of the location or other special feature of the prefecture. An example of a prefectural flag is that of Nagano, displayed to the right. In the center of the white disc, the orange Katakana character ナ (na) appears. One interpretation of the mon is that the na symbol represents a mountain and the white disc, a lake. The orange color evokes the sun while the white color represents the snow of the region.[11] Image File history File links Flag_of_Nagano,_Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nagano,_Japan. ... Nagano Prefecture (長野県; Nagano-ken) is located on Honshu island, Japan. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... The prefectures of Japan are the countrys 47 sub-national jurisdictions: one metropolis (都 to), Tokyo; one circuit (道 dō), Hokkaidō; two urban prefectures (府 fu), Osaka and Kyoto; and 43 other prefectures (県 ken). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Heraldry of Japan The chrysanthemum (kiku), seen in gold between the four bursts of this Breast Star of the Order of Chrysanthemum (a medal), is the mon of the Japanese Emperor. ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ... Categories: Host cities of the Winter Olympic Games | Cities in Nagano Prefecture | Japan geography stubs ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ...


Each municipality of Japan also has its own flag. The designs of the city flags are similar to the prefectural flags: a mon on a monocolored background. The example to the right is the flag of Yokohama-shi in Kanagawa Prefecture. The main symbol, adopted in 1909, is composed of the katakana characters for hama (ハマ). The emblem is officially colored red and appears in the shape of a diamond. The background color is white and the height of the emblem is 3/5ths of the height of the flag.[12] Japan has three levels of government: national, prefectural, and municipal. ... For a tire company, known by Yokohama Tyre, see Yokohama Rubber Company. ... Kanagawa Prefecture ) is a prefecture located in the southern Kantō region of HonshÅ«, Japan. ... Katakana ) is a Japanese syllabary, one component of the Japanese writing system along with hiragana, kanji, and in some cases the Latin alphabet. ...




Historical

Flag of Allied Occupied Japan. (1945 - 1952)
Flag of Allied Occupied Japan. (1945 - 1952)
For a list of historical flags, see List of Japanese flags: Historical.

The earliest recorded Japanese flag in Japan occurred during the unification period. The flags belonged to each Daimyo and were used mostly for battles. Most of the designs of the flags were long banners and is usually charged with the mon of the Daimyo. Even members of the same family, such as a son, father and a brother, had different flags to carry to battle. The use of the flags were for identification and were carried by soldiers on their backs and also on their horses. Generals had their own flags, but most were square in shape.[13] After the Meiji Restoration, the use of the Daimyo flags were discontinued and the flags of the modern Japanese state we used.[14] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Capital Tokyo Language(s) Japanese Political structure Military occupation Military Governor  - 1945-1951 Douglas MacArthur  - 1951-1952 Matthew Ridgway Emperor  - 1926-1989 Hirohito Historical era Post-WWII  - Surrender of Japan August 15, 1945  - San Francisco Treaty April 28, 1952 At the end of the Second World War, Japan was occupied... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Flag Capital Not specified Language(s) Japanese Political structure Military occupation Historical era Post-WWII  - Battle of Okinawa April 1–June 21, 1945  - Treaty of San Francisco April 28, 1952  - Disestablished May 14, 1972 Currency United States dollar The Government of the Ryukyu Islands ) or U.S. Military government of... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... The Meiji Restoration ), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Revolution, or Renewal, was a chain of events that led to enormous changes in Japans political and social structure. ...


While not an official national flag, the Z signal flag played a major role in Japanese naval history. On May 27, 1905, Admiral Heiachiro Togo of the Mikasa was preparing to engage the Russian Baltic Fleet. Before the Battle of Tsushima began, Togo raised the Z flag on the Mikasa and engaged the Russian fleet, winning the battle for Japan. The raising of the flag said to the crew the following: "The fate of Imperial Japan hangs on this one battle; all hands will exert themselves and do their best." The Z flag was raised on the aircraft carrier Akagi on the eve of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in December of 1941.[15] is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Mikasa (三笠市; -shi) is a city located in Sorachi, Hokkaido, Japan. ... Combatants Empire of Japan Russian Empire Commanders Heihachiro Togo Zinovi Rozhdestvenski # Nikolai Nebogatov Strength 4 battleships 27 cruisers destroyers and auxiliary vessels 8 battleships 3 coastal battleships 8 cruisers Casualties 117 dead 583 injured 3 torpedo boats sunk 4,380 dead 5,917 captured 21 ships sunk 7 captured 6... Mikasa (三笠市; -shi) is a city located in Sorachi, Hokkaido, Japan. ... Akagi means (赤城) red castle, (赤木) red tree, or (赤来) red future in the Japanese language, and may refer to: A volcano in the Kanto region of Japan Akagi, Gunma, a village in Gunma Prefecture Akagi, Shimane (赤来町), a former town in Shimane Prefecture Kei Akagi, a jazz pianist AKAGI, an anime series by... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


After World War II, an ensign was used by Japanese civil ships. Modified from the "E" signal code, the flag was used from September 1945 until the American occupation of Japan ceased.[16] For the islands of Okinawa and Ryukyu, a similar flag was used from 1952 until 1976. Modified from the delta signal flag, this flag was used by ships registered on the islands. Once the islands were transferred to Japanese control, the flag was discontinued and replaced by the Hinomaru and a pennant that said Ryukyu in English and Japanese.[17] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the prefecture. ... The Ryukyu Islands (琉球列島 Ryūkyū-rettō) are an island group, the southern portion belonging to Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the northern part belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. ... Delta may refer to: Look up delta in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Protocol

Japanese flag flying in Tokyo
Japanese flag flying in Tokyo

When the national flag is raised, it is asked that all should face the flag and remove all head dress. It is acceptable to place the right hand on top of the heart, but the foreign tradition is a new concept in Japan. The flag is flown from sunrise until sunset, though it is allowed to fly the flag from the opening and closing of a business or an educational facility. When flying the Japanese flag with that of another country, the Japanese flag takes the position of honor the flag of the guest country flies to its right at the same height. When more than one foreign flag is displayed, it is arranged in the alphabet order prescribed by the United Nations. When the flag becomes unsuitable to use, it is preferred to burn the flag in private.[18] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Japanese flag flying in Tokyo next to an unknown flag. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Japanese flag flying in Tokyo next to an unknown flag. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


Specifically in Japan, the national flag is suggested to be flown from a pole topped by a golden sphere finial. It has been a custom since the death of Emperor Meiji that the national flag is topped by black cloth to designate mourning. To do this, you must take a piece of black cloth and first cover the sphere finial. Then, you take a larger piece of black cloth and extend it until the fly of the flag is reached. This is mostly for flags that cannot be raised or lowered. For flags that can be raised or lowered, you hoist the flag to the top, then slowly lower it to approximately halfway down the pole. The Cabinet of the Prime Minister has the authority to place the flag at half-staff. To fold the Japanese flag, it is suggested to fold it from top to bottom twice, then fold the fly end about halfway towards the hoist side of the flag. Then you roll the rest of the flag up and tie it with a string.[18] Finial at Aachen town hall Illustration by Viollet-le-Duc, 1856 The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasise the apex of a gable, or any of various distinctive ornaments at the top, end, or corner of a building or structure. ... Emperor Meiji ) (November 3, 1852 — July 30, 1912) was the 122nd emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from February 3, 1867 until his death. ...


Derivatives

Japanese Vexillological Association flag
Japanese Vexillological Association flag

Other than the flags used by the military, there are several flags whose designs were inspired by the national flag. Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Japanese_Vexillological_Association. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Japanese_Vexillological_Association. ...


In 2000, a new organization was established in Japan to promote vexillology inside the country. The organization, Japanese Vexillological Association (Nihon Kishougaku Kyoukai), also sought a flag and symbol to be used by the organization. Out of the sixty-one entries, a flag based on the Hinomaru was chosen. The main field of the flag is with the red sun disc resting at the upper portion of the flag. Below the sun disc are interlocking ropes, which is used as the symbol of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques.[19] The joined knots represent fellowship and ropes are devices that are used to raise and lower flags.[20] The ratio of the flag is 2:3 and was designed by Phil Nelson.[19] Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ... Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ...


Another Japanese flag that influences other flag designs is that of the naval ensign. One such flag design is used by the Asahi Shimbun. At the bottom hoist of the flag, one quarter of the sun is displayed. The Japanese character 朝 colored white, covers most of the sun. The rays extending from the sun occur in a red and white order; culminating in thirteen total stripes. The flag is commonly seen at the national high school baseball tournament, as the Asahi Shimbun is a main sponsor of the tournament. Asahi-OSAKA office Asahi is a common name in Japan, for other uses see Asahi. ...


References

  1. ^ Flags of the World website Japan. Updated December 23, 2006. Retrieved June 26, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c Government of Japan Law Concerning the National Flag and Anthem. Passed 13 August 1999. (Japanese)
  3. ^ "Album des pavillons nationaux et des marques distinctives" by Armand du Payrat, pub. Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, France, 2000 [8th edition] (French)
  4. ^ Government of Japan. Official document showing the drawing of the JGSDF flag. Retrieved July 15, 2007. (Japanese)
  5. ^ Xinhua 2006 Article on a model wearing the Naval Ensign as clothing and Chinese attitude towards the flag. Retrieved July 15, 2007. (Chinese)
  6. ^ Flags of the World. Masthead Pennant (Japan). Retrieved July 15, 2007.
  7. ^ Flags of the World. Air Self Defense Force (Japan). Retrieved July 15, 2007.
  8. ^ Flags of the World. Imperial flags, 1870-1875 (Japan). Retrieved July 15, 2007.
  9. ^ Flags of the World. Flags of the Imperial Japanese Family (1899). Retrieved July 15, 2007.
  10. ^ Flags of the World. Japanese Royalty Flags. Retrieved July 15, 2007.
  11. ^ Flags of the World Nagano Prefecture - Japan. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  12. ^ Flags of the World Yokohama si (Japan. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  13. ^ Flags of the World Daimyo flags, 15th - 17th century (Japan). Retrieved June 10, 2007.
  14. ^ Flags of the World Japan - Historic flags. Retrieved June 10, 2007.
  15. ^ Flags of the World Japan - Z flag. Retrieved June 10, 2007.
  16. ^ Flags of the World Japan - Postwar ensigns, much like the C-Pennant modified from the signal flag "C" used by postwar German shipping. Retrieved June 10, 2007.
  17. ^ Flags of the World Ryukyu Okinawa Prefecture (Japan). Retrieved July 11, 2007.
  18. ^ a b Sarago Flag Company Protocol on how to fly the Hinomaru. Retrieved June 20, 2007. (Japanese)
  19. ^ a b Flags of the World Flag of the NKK. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  20. ^ Flags of the World Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. Retrieved July 10, 2007.

Screenshot of the Flags of the World website Official flag Flags of the World (or FOTW) is the Internets largest website devoted to vexillology, containing comprehensive information about all kinds of flags. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Xinhua (Chinese:新华通讯社/新華通訊社, pinyin:xīnhuá tōngxùnshè) is also the short for Xinhua News Agency Xinhua (Chinese:新化县/新化縣, pinyin:xīnhuà xiàn) is a county in Hunan,China, See Xinhua... The flag of Germany was adopted in its present form in 1919. ... Screenshot of the Flags of the World website Official flag Flags of the World (or FOTW) is the Internets largest website devoted to vexillology, containing comprehensive information about all kinds of flags. ...

See also

The National and Imperial Seal of Japan was originally the Imperial Seal, and is called 菊の御紋 Kiku No Gomon in Japanese, which, literally, means Noble Symbol of Chrysanthemum or Imperial Seal of Chrysanthemum . The Imperial Seal is used by members of the Japanese Imperial family. ... This is a list of flags used in Japan. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Heraldry of Japan The chrysanthemum (kiku), seen in gold between the four bursts of this Breast Star of the Order of Chrysanthemum (a medal), is the mon of the Japanese Emperor. ... Nobori (幟), literally meaning banner, had a more specific meaning on the battlefields of feudal Japan. ... An illustration depicting a typical sashimono, worn with battle gear Sashimono (指物, 差物, 挿物) were small banners worn by Japanese medieval soldiers for identification during battles. ... A variety of Uma-Jirushi designs, taken from the 15th century book O Uma Jirushi. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Japan (1182 words)
On June 13, 1870, the Army "National Flag" was gazetted as a 16-ray Rising Sun flag, 4 feet 4 inches by 5 feet, with the centrally-located sun disc one-third the width of the flag.
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Also gazetted were the flag of the Emperor and the flag of the Imperial Family, shown on FOTW as the Emperor's Flag, 1870-1879 and Royal Family, 1976 (Family).
Japanese Flag - Flag Of Japan (234 words)
If you would like to use this flag of Japan or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this map of Japan or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
If you would like to use this information for Japan or any other on your website you are welcome to do so, all we ask is that you include a link back to our site on the same page.
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