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Encyclopedia > Flag of India
Indian National Flag Flag ratio: 2:3
Indian National Flag
Flag ratio: 2:3
Image:Example.of.complex.text.rendering.svg This article contains Indic text.
Without rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes or other symbols instead of Indic characters; or irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts.

The National Flag of India was adopted in its present form during an ad hoc meeting of the Constituent Assembly held on the 22 July 1947, a few days before India's independence from the British on 15 August, 1947. It has served as the national flag of the Dominion of India between 15 August 1947 and 26 January 1950 and that of the Republic of India thereafter.[1] In India, the term "tricolour" [Tirangā – तिरंगा (in Hindi)] almost always refers to the Indian national flag. Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links FIAV_111000. ... Image File history File links Example. ... The Brahmic family is a family of abugidas (writing systems) used in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, Manchuria. ... Ad hoc is a Latin phrase which means for this [purpose]. It generally signifies a solution that has been tailored to a specific purpose, such as a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol, and specific-purpose equation and things like that. ... A constituent assembly is a body elected with the purpose of drafting, and in some cases, adopting a constitution. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... Anthem God Save The King Capital New Delhi Language(s) Hindustani, English and many others Government Monarchy King of India George VI Governor-General  - 1947-48 The Earl Mountbatten of Burma  - 1948-50 C. Rajagopalachari Prime Minister of India Jawaharlal Nehru Historical era Cold War  - Independence August 15, 1947  - Indo... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hindi ( , Devanagari: or , IAST: , IPA: ), an Indo-European language spoken all over India in varying degrees and extensively in northern and central India, is one of the two central official languages of India, the other being English. ...


The flag is a horizontal tricolour of "deep saffron" at the top, white in the middle, and green at the bottom. In the centre, there is a navy blue wheel with twenty-four spokes, known as the Ashoka Chakra, taken from the Lion Capital of Asoka erected atop Ashoka pillar at Sarnath. The diameter of this Chakra is three-fourths of the height of the white strip. The ratio of the width of the flag to its length is 2:3.[2] The flag is also the Indian Army's war flag, hoisted daily on military installations. Saffron is a shade of yellow resembling the spice saffron. ... Navy blue is an especially dark shade of the color blue. ... The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... Emblem of India. ... The pillars of Ashoka are a series of columns dispersed throughout the northern Indian subcontinent, and erected by the Mauryan king Ashoka during his reign in the 3rd century BCE. SAlMAN Ashish Many of the pillars are carved with proclamations reflecting Buddhist teachings: the Edicts of Ashoka. ... Sarnath (also Mrigadava, Migadāya, Rishipattana, Isipatana) is the deer park where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma, and where the Buddhist Sangha came into existence through the enlightenment of Kondanna. ... For the Naruto jutsu, see Chakra (Naruto). ... The Indian Army is one of the armed forces of India and has responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A war flag (or military flag) is a variant of a national flag for use by the nations military forces on land. ...


It should be pointed out that the actual colour used in the top band in all depictions of the flag—including this page—is either blaze orange or pumpkin rather either than saffron or deeper shades of saffron like goldenrod or dark goldenrod.[3] Safety orange, also known as blaze orange, vivid orange or International orange, is a color used to set things apart from their surroundings, particularly in complementary contrast to the blue color of the sky. ... Pumpkin is a color that resembles pumpkins. ... Saffron is a shade of yellow resembling the spice saffron. ... Goldenrod is a color that resembles the goldenrod plant. ... Goldenrod is a color that resembles the goldenrod plant. ...


The Indian National Flag was designed by Pingali Venkayya.[4] The official flag specifications require that the flag be made only of "khadi," a special type of hand-spun yarn. The display and use of the flag are strictly enforced by the Indian Flag Code.[2] Pingali Venkayya Pingali Venkayya (August 2, 1876 - July 4, 1963) was the designer of the Indian national flag. ... khadi simply means cotton Khadi is Indian handspun and hand-woven cloth. ... The Indian flag code are a set of laws that govern the usage of the Flag of India. ...


A heraldic description of the flag would be Party per fess Saffron and Vert on a fess Argent a "Chakra" Azure. Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...

This is the famous original sandstone sculpted Lion Capital of Ashoka preserved at Sarnath Museum which was originally erected around 250 BCE atop an Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions are standing back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a Lion instead. The wheel "Ashoka Chakra" from its base has been placed onto the center of the National Flag of India.
This is the famous original sandstone sculpted Lion Capital of Ashoka preserved at Sarnath Museum which was originally erected around 250 BCE atop an Ashoka Pillar at Sarnath. The angle from which this picture has been taken, minus the inverted bell-shaped lotus flower, has been adopted as the National Emblem of India showing the Horse on the left and the Bull on the right of the Ashoka Chakra in the circular base on which the four Indian lions are standing back to back. On the far side there is an Elephant and a Lion instead. The wheel "Ashoka Chakra" from its base has been placed onto the center of the National Flag of India.

Contents

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Lion Capital of Ashoka is a sculpture of four lions standing back to back. ... Sarnath has yielded a rich collection of sculptures, artifacts and edifices comprising numerous Buddha and Bodhisattva images and other ancient remains. ... (Redirected from 250 BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC - 250s BC - 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC Years: 255 BC 254 BC 253 BC 252 BC 251 BC - 250 BC... Fragment of the 6th Pillar Edict of Ashoka (238 BCE), in Brahmi, sandstone. ... Sarnath (also Mrigadava, Migadāya, Rishipattana, Isipatana) is the deer park where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma, and where the Buddhist Sangha came into existence through the enlightenment of Kondanna. ... The inverted bell is a metaphorical name for geometric shape that resembles a bell upside down. ... Binomial name Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. ... The Emblem of India The Emblem of India is an adaptation from the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka. ... The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... Trinomial name Panthera leo persica Meyer, 1826 Current distribution of the Asiatic Lion in the wild Synonyms Leo leo goojratensis (India) Leo leo persicus (Persia) The Asiatic Lion (Panthera leo persica; also known as Indian Lion) is a subspecies of the lion found only in India. ... Indian National Flag - tiranga Flag ratio: 2:3 The National Flag of India was adopted as such during an ad hoc meeting of the Constituent Assembly held on 1947-07-22, just before Indias independence on 1947-08-15. ...

Design

The following are the approximate colours of the Indian flag in different colour models. It is sorted into the HTML RGB web colours (hexadecimal notation); the CMYK equivalent; dye colours and the Pantone equivalent number.[1] HTML, short for Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... A representation of additive color mixing—In CRT based (analog electronics) television three color electron guns are used to stimulate such an arrangement of phosphorescent coatings of the glass, the resultant reemission of photons providing the image seen by the eye. ... Web colors are colors used in designing web pages, and the methods for describing and specifying those colors. ... In mathematics and computer science, hexadecimal, base-16, or simply hex, is a numeral system with a radix, or base, of 16, usually written using the symbols 0–9 and A–F, or a–f. ... It has been suggested that process color be merged into this article or section. ... For the record label, see Pantone Music. ...

Scheme Colour HTML CMYK Textile colour Pantone
Saffron #FF9933 0-50-90-0 Saffron 1495c
White #FFFFFF 0-0-0-0 Cool Grey 1c
Green #138808 100-0-70-30 India green 362c
Navy blue #000080 100-98-26-48 Navy blue 2755c

The official (CYMK) value of the top band is (0,50,90,0)—closest to the colour pumpkin—with CYMK = (0,54,90,0); the CYMK value of true saffron and deep saffron (goldenrod) being (4, 23, 81, 5)) and (0, 24, 85, 15)) respectively.[1] Pumpkin is a color that resembles pumpkins. ... Saffron is a shade of yellow resembling the spice saffron. ... Goldenrod is a color that resembles the goldenrod plant. ...


Symbolism

The Ashoka Chakra, "the wheel of Law (Dharma)"
The Ashoka Chakra, "the wheel of Law (Dharma)"

A few days before India became independent on August 1947, the specially constituted Constituent Assembly decided that the flag of India must be acceptable to all parties and communities.[1] A flag with three colours, Saffron, White and Green with the Ashoka Chakra was selected. Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who later became India's first Vice President, clarified the adopted flag and described its significance as follows: Image File history File links Ashoka_Chakra. ... Image File history File links Ashoka_Chakra. ... The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... A constituent assembly is a body elected with the purpose of drafting, and in some cases, adopting a constitution. ... The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan ,Tamil:(சர்வேபள்ளி ராதாகிருஷ்ணன்), (September 5, 1888 – April 17, 1975), was a philosopher and statesman. ... The Vice-President of India is second behind the President in the Executive branch of the Government of India. ...

Bhagwa or the saffron colour denotes renunciation or disinterestedness. Our leaders must be indifferent to material gains and dedicate themselves to their work. The white in the centre is light, the path of truth to guide our conduct. The green shows our relation to (the) soil, our relation to the plant life here, on which all other life depends. The "Ashoka Chakra" in the centre of the white is the wheel of the law of dharma. Truth or satya, dharma or virtue ought to be the controlling principle of those who work under this flag. Again, the wheel denotes motion. There is death in stagnation. There is life in movement. India should no more resist change, it must move and go forward. The wheel represents the dynamism of a peaceful change.[2]

A widely held unofficial interpretation is that the saffron stands for purity and spirituality, white for peace and truth, green for fertility and prosperity and the wheel for justice The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Satya is a true badman. ...


History

The flag of British India
British Indian Red Ensign with the Star of India
British Indian Red Ensign with the Star of India
The Calcutta Flag
The Calcutta Flag
The flag raised by Bhikaiji Cama in 1907
The flag raised by Bhikaiji Cama in 1907
The flag used during the Home Rule movement in 1917
The flag used during the Home Rule movement in 1917
The flag unofficially adopted in 1921.
The flag unofficially adopted in 1921.
The proposed saffron flag with the brown chakra in 1931.
The proposed saffron flag with the brown chakra in 1931.
The flag adopted in 1931. This flag was also the battle ensign of the Indian National Army
The flag adopted in 1931. This flag was also the battle ensign of the Indian National Army
The flag of Azad Hind, raised first for the Free India Legion in Nazi Germany.
The flag of Azad Hind, raised first for the Free India Legion in Nazi Germany.

At the beginning of the 20th century, as the Indian independence movement seeking freedom from British colonial rule gained ground, the need was felt for a national flag that would serve as a powerful symbol of these aspirations. In 1904, Sister Nivedita, an Irish disciple of Swami Vivekananda, came up with the first flag of India, later referred to as Sister Nivedita's Flag. It was a red square-shaped flag with a yellow inset; it depicted a "Vajra Chinha" (thunderbolt) with a white lotus alongside it in the centre. The words "বন্দে মাতরম" (Bônde Matorom meaning "Mother[land], I bow to thee!") were inscribed on the flag in Bengali. The red colour signified the freedom struggle, yellow signified victory, and the white lotus signified purity.[1] Image File history File links Imperial-India-Blue-Ensign. ... Image File history File links Imperial-India-Blue-Ensign. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 398 pixelsFull resolution (992 × 493 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This photograph belongs to me. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 398 pixelsFull resolution (992 × 493 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This photograph belongs to me. ... Anthem God Save The Queen/King British India, circa 1860 Capital Calcutta (1858-1912), New Delhi (1912-1947) Language(s) Hindi, Urdu, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1877-1901 Victoria  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - January-December 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George... The Star of India may refer to one of the followings: Star of India (gem): the largest star sapphire in the world. ... Image File history File links Calcutta Flag – Unofficial flag of India in 1907. ... Image File history File links Calcutta Flag – Unofficial flag of India in 1907. ... Image File history File links Flag used by Madam Cama in Stuttgart, Germany in 1907 as a flag of India. ... Image File history File links Flag used by Madam Cama in Stuttgart, Germany in 1907 as a flag of India. ... Bhikaiji Rustom Cama (Madam Cama, Madame Cama) (September 24, 1861 - August 13, 1936) was a prominent figure in the Indian Nationalist Movement. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India_1917. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India_1917. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links 1931-India-flag. ... Image File history File links 1931-India-flag. ... Image File history File links 1931_Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links 1931_Flag_of_India. ... The Indian National Army (I.N.A) or Azad Hind Fauj was the army of the Arzi Hukumat-e-Azad Hind (The Provisional Government of Free India ) which fought along with the Japanese 15th Army during the Japanese Campaign in Burma, and in the Battle of Imphal, during the Second... Image File history File links AzadHindFlag. ... Image File history File links AzadHindFlag. ... Flag of the Provisional Government of Free India. ... The Legion Freies Indien, or the Indische Freiwilligen-Legion Regiment 950 variously known as the Tiger Legion, the Free India Legion (in English), The Azad Hind Legion, or the I.R 950 (Indisches Infanterie Regiment 950) was an Indian armed unit raised in 1941 attached to the Wehrmacht, ostensibly according... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... The Indian Independence Movement was a series of revolutions empowered by the people of India put forth to battle the British Empire for complete political independence, beginning with the Rebellion of 1857. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Margaret Elizabeth Noble (1867-1911), better known as Sister Nivedita, was a social worker, author, teacher and disciple of Swami Vivekananda. ... Swami Vivekananda (Sanskrit: , Svāmi Vivekānanda) (January 12, 1863 – July 4, 1902), whose pre-monastic name was Narendranath Dutta (Bengali: , Nôrendrônath Dôt-tô), was one of the most famous and influential spiritual leaders of the philosophies of Vedanta and Yoga. ... Vajrasattva holds the vajra in his right hand and a bell in his left hand. ... Binomial name Gaertn. ... Typical depiction of Bharat Mata by Abanindranath Tagore Vande Mataram (Sanskrit: वन्दे मातरम् Vande Mātaram, Bengali: বন্দে মাতরম Bônde Matorom) is the national song of India, distinct from the national anthem of India Jana Gana Mana. The song was composed by Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay in a mixture of Bengali and Sanskrit. ... Bengali or Bangla (IPA: ) is an Indo-Aryan language of the eastern Indian subcontinent, evolved from the Magadhi Prakrit, Pāli and Sanskrit languages. ...


The first tricolour was unfurled on 1906-08-07, during a protest rally against the Partition of Bengal, by Schindra Prasad Bose in Parsi Bagan Square in Calcutta. This flag came to be known as the Calcutta Flag. The flag had three horizontal bands of equal width with the top being orange, the centre yellow and the bottom green in colour. It had eight half-opened lotus flowers on the top stripe, and a picture of the sun and a crescent moon on the bottom stripe. The words Vande Mataram were inscribed in the centre in the Devanagari script.[5] 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Partition of Bengal in 1905, was made on 16 October by then Viceroy of India, Lord Curzon. ... Schindra Prasad Bose, was a follower of Sir Surendranath Banerjee and the son-in-law of the moderate Brahmo leader, Krishna Kumar Mitra. ... , “Calcutta” redirects here. ... The Calcutta Flag The Calcutta Flag was one of the first unofficial flags of India. ... Rigveda manuscript in Devanagari (early 19th century) Devanāgarī (देवनागरी — in English pronounced ) (ISCII – IS13194:1991) [1] is an abugida alphabet used to write several Indian languages, including Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Bihari, Bhili, Konkani, Bhojpuri and Nepali from Nepal. ...


On 1907-08-22, Bhikaiji Cama unfurled another tricolour flag in Stuttgart, Germany. This flag had green at the top, saffron in the centre and red at the bottom, the green standing for Islam and the saffron for both Hinduism and Buddhism. The flag had eight lotuses in a line on the green band representing the eight provinces of British India. The words Vande Mataram, in the Devanagari script, were inscribed on the central band. On the lowest band, towards the hoist of the flag was a crescent, and towards the fly a sun. The flag was jointly designed by Bhikaiji Cama, Veer Savarkar and Shyamji Krishna Varma.[5] After the outbreak of World War I, this flag became known as the Berlin Committee Flag after it was adopted by the Indian Revolutionaries at the Berlin Committee. This flag was actively used in Mesopotamia during the First World War. The Ghadar Party flag was also used in the United States as a symbol for India for a short period of time. Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Bhikaiji Rustom Cama (Madam Cama, Madame Cama) (September 24, 1861 - August 13, 1936) was a prominent figure in the Indian Nationalist Movement. ... , City Center seen from Weinsteige Road Castle Solitude The 1956 TV Tower The Weissenhof Estate in 1927 Stuttgart (IPA: []) is the capital of the state of Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany. ... Anthem God Save The King The British Indian Empire, 1909 Capital Calcutta (until 1912), New Delhi (after 1912) Language(s) Hindustani, English and many others Government Monarchy Emperor of India  - 1858-1901 Victoria¹  - 1901-1910 Edward VII  - 1910-1936 George V  - 1936 Edward VIII  - 1936-1947 George VI Viceroy²  - 1858... Rigveda manuscript in Devanagari (early 19th century) DevanāgarÄ« (देवनागरी — in English pronounced ) (ISCII – IS13194:1991) [1] is an abugida alphabet used to write several Indian languages, including Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Bihari, Bhili, Konkani, Bhojpuri and Nepali from Nepal. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bhikaiji Rustom Cama (Madam Cama, Madame Cama) (September 24, 1861 - August 13, 1936) was a prominent figure in the Indian Nationalist Movement. ... Veer Savarkar SEE Vinayak Damodar Savarkar External links Was Veer Savarkar a Nazi? - Dr Koenraad Elst Categories: Indian people stubs ... Shyamji Krishna Varma (1857-1930) was an Indian nationalist. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mesopotamia (disambiguation). ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Ghadar Party was an organization founded by the Indians(mostly Punjabis, of the United States and Canada in June, 1913 with the aim to liberate India from British rule. ...


The Home Rule Movement formed by Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Annie Besant in 1917 adopted a new flag, one which featured five red and four green horizontal stripes. On the upper left quadrant was the Union Flag which signified the Dominion status that the movement sought to achieve. A crescent and a star, both in white, are set in top fly. Seven white stars are arranged as in the Saptarishi constellation (the constellation Ursa Major), which is sacred to Hindus. This flag could not become popular among the masses.[5] Home Rule flag The Home Rule Movement was formed by Annie Besant and Lokmanya Tilak with the aim of seeking a Dominion status within the British Empire to the Indian Empire in 1917. ... Bal Gangadhar Tilak (1856 - 1920), was an Indian nationalist, social reformer and freedom fighter who was the first popular leader of the Indian Independence Movement. ... Annie Besant Plaque on house in Colby Road, London SE19 where Annie Besant lived in 1874. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... This article is about Dominions of the British Empire and of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... Ursa Major (IPA: ) is a constellation visible throughout the year in most of the northern hemisphere. ...


A year earlier in 1916, Pingali Venkayya, from Machilipatnam in present-day Andhra Pradesh tried to devise a common national flag. His endeavours were noticed by Umar Sobani and SB Bomanji, who together formed the Indian National Flag Mission. When Venkayya sought Mahatma Gandhi's approval for the flag, the Mahatma suggested the incorporation of the "Charkha" or spinning wheel on the flag, symbolising "the embodiment of India and the redemption of all its ills". The humble spinning-wheel had become a hallowed symbol of the economic regeneration of India under the Mahatma's championship. Pingali Venkayya came up with a flag with the charkha on a red and green background. However, Mahatma Gandhi found that the flag did not represent all the religions of India.[4] Pingali Venkayya Pingali Venkayya (August 2, 1876 - July 4, 1963) was the designer of the Indian national flag. ... , Machilipatnam (Telugu:మచిలిపట్నం)  , also known as Masulipatnam or Bandar or Masula (for short among Finnish mission workers[2]), is a city and a special grade municipality in Krishna district in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. ... “Andhra” redirects here. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ... Pingali Venkayya Pingali Venkayya (August 2, 1876 - July 4, 1963) was the designer of the Indian national flag. ... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ...


To address Mahatma Gandhi's concerns, another new flag was indeed designed. This tricolour featured white on top, green in the centre and red at the bottom, symbolising the minority religions, Muslims and Hindus respectively, with a "Charkha" drawn across all three bands. Parallels were drawn with the fact that it closely resembled the Flag of Ireland, symbol of the other major freedom struggle against the British Empire.[1] This flag was first unfurled at the congress party meeting in Ahmedabad. Although this flag was not adopted as the official flag of the Indian National Congress party, it was nevertheless widely used during the freedom movement. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ... The national flag of the Ireland (Irish: An Bhratach Náisiúnta), also known as the tricolour,[1] is a vertical tricolour of green (at the hoist), white, and orange. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... , Ahmedabad (Gujarati: , Hindi: अहमदाबाद ) is the largest city in the state of Gujarat and the seventh-largest urban agglomeration in India, with a population of almost 51 lakhs (5. ... Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party and abbreviated INC) is a major political party in India. ...


However, there were many who were not satisfied with the communal interpretation of the flag. The All India Sanskrit Congress that convened in Calcutta in 1924 suggested the inclusion of saffron or ochre and the "gadha" (mace) of Vishnu as the symbol of the Hindus. Later that year, it was suggested that geru (an earthy-red colour) "typified the spirit of renunciation and symbolised an ideal common to the Hindu yogis and sanyasis as well as the Muslim fakirs and darveshes." The Sikhs also stepped up the demand to either include a yellow colour that would represent them, or abandon religious symbolism altogether. This article is about the color. ... Vishnu (IAST , Devanagari ), (honorific: Sri Vishnu) also known as Narayana is the Supreme Being (i. ... Geru is an earthy-red colour. ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... Sanyasa (pronounced sanyaas) symbolises the conception of the mystic life in Hinduism where a person is now integrated into the spiritual world after wholly giving up material life. ... A fakir or faqir (Arabic: فقیر poor) is a Sufi, especially one who performs feats of endurance or apparent magic. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is a religion that began in fifteenth century Northern India with the teachings of Nanak and nine successive human gurus. ...


In light of these developments, the Congress Working Committee appointed a seven member Flag Committee on 1931-04-02 to sort out these issues. A resolution was passed noting that "objection has been taken to the three colours in the flag on the ground that they are conceived on the communal basis." The unlikely result of these confabulations was a flag featuring just one colour, ochre, and a "Charkha" at upper hoist. Though recommended by the flag committee, the INC did not adopt this flag, as it seemed to project a communalistic ideology. Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the color. ...


Later, the final resolution on a flag was passed when the Congress committee met at Karachi in 1931. The tricolour flag then adopted was designed by Pingali Venkayya. It featured three horizontal strips of saffron, white and green, with a "Charkha" in the centre. The colours were interpreted thus: saffron for courage; white for truth and peace; green for faith and prosperity. The "Charkha" symbolised the economic regeneration of India and the industriousness of its people.[1]   (Urdu: , Sindhi: ) is the largest city in Pakistan and is the provincial capital of Sindh province. ... Pingali Venkayya Pingali Venkayya (August 2, 1876 - July 4, 1963) was the designer of the Indian national flag. ...


At the same time a variant of the flag was being used by the Indian National Army that included the words "Azad Hind" with a springing tiger in lieu of the "Charkha" signifying Subhash Chandra Bose's armed struggle as opposed to Mahatma Gandhi's non-violence. This tricolour was hoisted for the first time on Indian soil in Manipur by Subhash Chandra Bose. The Indian National Army (I.N.A) or Azad Hind Fauj was the army of the Arzi Hukumat-e-Azad Hind (The Provisional Government of Free India ) which fought along with the Japanese 15th Army during the Japanese Campaign in Burma, and in the Battle of Imphal, during the Second... Subhash Chandra Bose, (Bangla: নেতাজী সুভাষ চন্দ্র বসু ( सुभाष चदंर वसु ) Shubhash Chôndro Boshu) (January 23, 1897 – presumably August 18, 1945 [although this is disputed]note), also known as Netaji, was one of the most prominent leaders of the Indian Independence Movement against the British Raj and was a prominent supporter of the Axis dictatorships as... Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (Gujarati: , Hindi: , IAST: mohandās karamcand gāndhÄ«, IPA: ) (October 2, 1869 – January 30, 1948), was a major political and spiritual leader of India and the Indian independence movement. ... , Manipur   (Bengali: মণিপুর, Meitei Mayek: mnipur) is a state in northeastern India making its capital in the city of Imphal. ... Subhash Chandra Bose, (Bangla: নেতাজী সুভাষ চন্দ্র বসু ( सुभाष चदंर वसु ) Shubhash Chôndro Boshu) (January 23, 1897 – presumably August 18, 1945 [although this is disputed]note), also known as Netaji, was one of the most prominent leaders of the Indian Independence Movement against the British Raj and was a prominent supporter of the Axis dictatorships as...


A few days before India gained its freedom in August 1947, the Constituent Assembly was formed to discuss the flag of the India. They set up an ad hoc committee headed by Rajendra Prasad and consisting of Abul Kalam Azad, Sarojini Naidu, C. Rajagopalachari, KM Munshi and B.R. Ambedkar as its members. The Flag Committee was constituted on 1947-06-23 and it began deliberations on the issue. After three weeks they came to a decision on 14 July 1947, being that the flag of the Indian National Congress should be adopted as the National Flag of India with suitable modifications, to make it acceptable to all parties and communities. It was further resolved that the flag should not have any communal undertones. The "Dharma Chakra" which appears on the abacus of Sarnath was adopted in the place of the "Charkha". The flag was unfurled for the first time as that of an independent country on 15 August 1947.[6] A constituent assembly is a body elected with the purpose of drafting, and in some cases, adopting a constitution. ... Ad hoc is a Latin phrase which means for this [purpose]. It generally signifies a solution that has been tailored to a specific purpose, such as a tailor-made suit, a handcrafted network protocol, and specific-purpose equation and things like that. ... Dr. Rajendra Prasad (Hindi: डाक्टर राजेन्द्र प्रसाद) (December 3, 1884 – February 28, 1963) was the first President of India. ... Abul Kalam Muhiyuddin Ahmed (b. ... Sarojini Naidu (February 13, 1879 - March 2, 1949) was known as Bharatiya Kokila (The Nightingale of India) and was a child prodigy, freedom fighter and poet. ... Chakravarthi Rajagopalachari (Tamil: சக்ரவர்தி ராஜகோபாலாச்சாரி) (b. ... KM Munshi was a member of the Indian National Congress. ... Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar (April 14, 1891 or 1892 - December 6, 1956) was the most prominent Indian Untouchable leader of the 20th century. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party and abbreviated INC) is a major political party in India. ... Sarnath (also Mrigadava, Migadāya, Rishipattana, Isipatana) is the deer park where Gautama Buddha first taught the Dharma, and where the Buddhist Sangha came into existence through the enlightenment of Kondanna. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Manufacturing process

Flag sizes
Size mm
1 6300 × 4200
2 3600 × 2400
3 2700 × 1800
4 1800 × 1200
5 1350 × 900
6 900 × 600
7 450 × 300
8 225 × 150
9 150 × 100
India's largest flag atop the Ministry building in Mumbai.
India's largest flag atop the Ministry building in Mumbai.
Closeup of the flag.
Closeup of the flag.

After India became a republic in 1950, the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) brought out the specifications for the flag for the first time in 1951. These were revised in 1964 to conform to the metric system which was adopted in India. The specifications were further amended on 17 August 1968.[6] The specifications cover all the essential requirements of the manufacture of the Indian flag including sizes, dye colour, chromatic values, brightness, thread count and hemp cordage. These guidelines are extremely stringent and any defect in the manufacture of flags is considered to be a serious offence liable to a fine or a jail term or both.[7] A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... Image File history File links Mantralaya is the administrative headquarters of Maharashtra Source: Taken by me on 11-Aug-2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of India Mantralaya, Mumbai ... Image File history File links Mantralaya is the administrative headquarters of Maharashtra Source: Taken by me on 11-Aug-2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of India Mantralaya, Mumbai ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x663, 23 KB) The flag atop the Mantralaya building is the largest in India Source: Taken by me on 11-Aug-2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of India ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (700x663, 23 KB) The flag atop the Mantralaya building is the largest in India Source: Taken by me on 11-Aug-2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of India ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The BIS logo The Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), the National Standards Body of India is involved in the development of technical standards (popularly known as Indian Standards), product quality and management system certifications and consumer affairs. ... “SI” redirects here. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ...


Khadi or hand-spun cloth is the only material allowed to be used for the flag. Raw materials for khadi are restricted to cotton, silk and wool. There are two kinds of khadi used, the first is the khadi-bunting which makes up the body of the flag and the second is the khadi-duck, which is a beige-coloured cloth that holds the flag to the pole. The khadi-duck is an unconventional type of weave that meshes three threads into a weave as compared to two weaves used in conventional weaving. This type of weaving is extremely rare, and there are fewer than a dozen weavers in India professing this skill. The guidelines also state that there should be exactly 150 threads per square centimetre, four threads per stitch,[7] and one square foot should weigh exactly 205 grams.[8][6] For the album by The Arrogant Worms, see Beige (album). ... BIC pen cap, about 1 gram. ...


The woven khadi is obtained from two handloom units in Dharwad and Bagalkot districts of northern Karnataka. Currently, Karnataka Khadi Gramodyoga Samyukta Sangha based in Hubli is the only licensed flag production and supply unit in India. Permission for setting up flag manufacturing units in India is allotted by the Khadi Development and Village Industries Commission (KVIC), though the BIS has the power to cancel the licences of units that flout guidelines.[6] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bagalkot is an administrative district in the state of Karnataka in India. ... , Karnātakā   (Kannada: ಕನಾ೯ಟಕ) (IPA: ) is one of the four southern states of India. ... Karnataka Khadi Gramodyoga Samyukta Sangha (KKGSS) (Kannada:ಕರ್ನಾಟಕ ಖಾದಿ ಗ್ರಾಮೊದ್ಯೋಗ ಸಂಯುಕ್ತ ಸಂಘ) is a manufacturing federation located in the Bengeri area of the city of Hubli in the Indian state of Karnataka. ... Hubli-Dharwad is a twin city in the state of Karnataka in India. ... The Khadi Development and Village Industries Commission is a non-profit group that serves to promote the use of khadi (a type of hand-woven cloth) in India. ...


Once woven, the material is sent to the BIS laboratories for testing. After stringent quality testing; the flag if approved, is returned to the factory. It is then bleached and dyed into the respective colours. In the centre the Ashoka Chakra is screen printed, stencilled or suitably embroidered. Care also has to be taken that the chakra is matched and completely visible on both sides. The BIS then checks for the colours and only then can the flag be sold.[7]


Each year around forty million flags are sold in India. The largest flag in India (6.3 × 4.2 m) is flown by the government of Maharashtra atop the Mantralaya building, the state administrative headquarters.[8] , Maharashtra (Marathi: महाराष्ट्र , IPA:  , translation: Great Nation) is Indias third largest state in area and second largest in population after Uttar Pradesh. ... Mantralaya building in Bombay Mantralaya is administrative headquarters of Maharashtra in South Bombay, built in 1955. ...


Proper flag protocol

Prior to 2002, the general public of India could not fly their national flag publicly except on designated national holidays. Only government offices and higher functionaries of the government could do so. An industrialist by name Naveen Jindal filed a Public interest petition in the Delhi High Court, seeking the striking down of this restriction. Jindal apparently flew the flag atop his office building, but as this was against the National flag code, the flag was confiscated and he was informed that he was liable to be prosecuted. Jindal argued that hoisting the National flag with due decorum and honour was his right as a citizen, and a way of expressing his love for India.[9] The case moved to the Supreme Court of India, which asked the Government of India to set up a committee to consider the matter. The Union Cabinet amended the Indian flag code with effect from 26 January 2002, allowing the general public to hoist the flag on all days of the year, provided they safeguarded the dignity, honour and respect of the flag. Naveen Jindal is a member of parliament, India since 2004 representing the constituency of Kurukshetra in the state of Haryana. ... Public interest is a term used to denote political movements and organizations that are in the public interest—supporting general public and civic causes, in opposition of private and corporate ones (particularistic goals). ... The High Court of Delhi was established on October 31, 1966. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... The Government of India (Hindi: भारत सरकार [1]Bhārat Sarkār), officially referred to as the Union Government, and commonly as Central Government, was established by the Constitution of India, and is the governing authority of a federal union of 28 states and 7 union territories, collectively called the Republic of... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


In the case of Union of India v. Yashwant Sharma[10], it was held that though the Flag Code is not a statute, restrictions under the Code need to be followed to preserve the dignity of the National Flag. The right to fly the National Flag is not an absolute right but a qualified right and should be read having regard to Article 51A of the Constitution.


Respect for the flag

Indian law says that the flag must at all times be treated with "dignity, loyalty and respect". The "Flag Code of India – 2002", which superseded "The Emblems and Names (Prevention of Improper Use) Act, 1950", governs the display and usage of the flag. Official regulation states that the flag must never touch the ground or water, be used as a tablecloth or draped in front of a platform, cover a statue, plaque, cornerstone etc. Until 2005, the flag could not be used in clothing, uniform or costume. On 5 July 2005, the Government of India amended the code, allowing use of the flag as clothing and uniform. It however cannot be used as clothing below the waist or as undergarments.[11] It is also prohibited to embroider the national flag and other symbols onto pillowcases or neckerchiefs.[12] is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The flag may not be intentionally placed upside down, dipped in anything, or hold any objects other than flower petals before unfurling. No sort of lettering may be inscribed on the flag.[2]


Handling of the flag

Correct display of the flag.

There are a number of traditional rules of respect that should be observed when handling or displaying the flag. When out in the open, the flag should always be hoisted at sunrise and lowered at sunset, irrespective of the weather conditions. The flag may be also flown on a public building at night under special circumstances. Image File history File links India-flag-horiz-vert. ... A typical sunrise, in New Zealand A sunrise through clouds over Oakland, California. ... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ...


The flag should never be depicted, displayed or flown upside down. Tradition also states that when draped vertically, the flag should not merely be rotated through 90 degrees, but also reversed. One "reads" a flag like the pages of a book, from top to bottom and from left to right, and after rotation the results should be the same. It is also insulting to display the flag in a frayed or dirty state. The same rule applies to the flagpoles and halyards used to hoist the flag, which should always be in a proper state of maintenance.[2] The two lines intersect to create two pairs of vertical angles. ... This article describes the unit of angle. ...


Correct display

Marquee direction (Left)

The rules regarding the correct methods to display the flag state, that when two flags are fully spread out horizontally on a wall behind a podium, their hoists should be towards each other with the saffron stripes uppermost. If the flag is displayed on a short flagpole, this should be mounted at an angle to the wall with the flag draped tastefully from it. If two national flags are displayed on crossed staffs, the hoists must be towards each other and the flags must be fully spread out. The flag should never be used as a cloth to cover tables, lecterns, podiums or buildings, or be draped from railings.[2] Image File history File links Image a derivative of w:image:SouthAfricaFlagTwoNations. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Flag. ... This article is about angles in geometry. ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... A podium is a platform that is used to raise something to a short distance above its surroundings. ...


With other countries

When the National Flag is flown outdoors in company with the national flags of other countries, there are several rules that govern the ways in which the flag must be flown, specifically that it must always occupy the position of honour. This means it must be the flag furthest to the right (observers' left) of all the flags on display, with the flags of other countries being arranged alphabetically according to the Latin alphabet. All the flags should be approximately the same size, with no flag being larger than the Indian flag. Each country's flag should be on a separate pole, with no national flag being flown on top of another from the same pole. Alphabetical redirects here. ...


It would be permissible in such a case to begin and also to end the row of flags with the Indian flag and also include it in the normal country wise alphabetical order. In case flags are to be flown in a closed circle, the national flag shall mark the beginning of the circle and the flags of other countries should proceed in a clockwise manner until the last flag is placed next to the national flag. The National flag of India must always be hoisted first and lowered last.


When the flag is displayed on crossed poles, the Indian flag's pole should be in front and the flag to the right (observers' left) of the other flag. When the United Nations flag is flown along with the Indian flag, it can be displayed on either side of it. The general practice is to fly the flag on the extreme right with reference to the direction which it is facing.[2] The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


With non-national flags

When the flag is displayed with other flags that are not national flags, such as corporate flags and advertising banners, the rules state that if the flags are on separate staffs, the flag of India should be in the middle, or the furthest left from the viewpoint of the onlookers, or at least one flag's breadth higher than the other flags in the group. Its flagpole must be in front of the other poles in the group, but if they are on the same staff, it must be the uppermost flag. If the flag is carried in procession with other flags, it must be at the head of the marching procession, or if carried with a row of flags in line abreast, it must be carried to the marching right of the procession.[2] Image File history File links Image a derivative of w:SouthAfricaFlagNonNational. ...


Showing the flag indoors

Whenever the flag is displayed indoors in the halls at public meetings or gatherings of any kind, it should always be on the right (observers' left), as this is the position of authority. So when the flag is displayed next to a speaker in the hall or other meeting place, it must be placed on the speaker's right hand. When it is displayed elsewhere in the hall, it should be to the right of the audience. An audience is a group of people who participate in an experience or encounter a work of art, literature, theatre, music or academics in any medium. ...

The flag should be displayed completely spread out with the saffron stripe on top. If hung vertically on the wall behind the podium, the saffron stripe should be to the left of the onlookers facing the flag with the hoist cord at the top.[2] Image File history File links Flag a derivative of w:image:SouthAfricaFlagIndoors. ...


Parades and ceremonies

The flag, when carried in a procession or parade or with another flag or flags, should be on the marching right or alone in the centre at the front. The flag may form a distinctive feature of the unveiling of a statue, monument, or plaque, but should never be used as the covering for the object. As a mark of respect to the flag, it should never be dipped to a person or thing. Regimental colours, organisational or institutional flags may be dipped as a mark of honour. United States Marines on parade. ... To dip a flag that is being carried means to lower it by turning it forward from an upright position to 45° or horizontal. ...

During the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the flag, or when the flag is passing in a parade or in a review, all persons present should face the flag and stand at attention. Those present in uniform should render the appropriate salute. When the flag is in a moving column, persons present will stand at attention or salute as the flag passes them. A dignitary may take the salute without a head dress. The flag salutation should be followed by the playing of the national anthem.[2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (837x335, 36 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of India ... Jana Gana Mana (Thou Art the Ruler of the Minds of All People) is the national anthem of India. ...


Display on vehicles

The privilege of flying the national flag on a vehicle is restricted to the President, Vice-President, Prime Minister, Governors and Lt. Governors, Chief Ministers, Cabinet Ministers and Junior Cabinet members of the Indian Parliament and state legislatures, Speakers of the Lok Sabha and state legislative assemblies, Chairmen of the Rajya Sabha and state legislative councils, judges of the Supreme Court of India and High Courts, and high ranking officers of the army, navy and air force. The President of India (Hindi: Rashtrapati) is the head of state and first citizen of India and the Supreme Commander of the Indian armed forces. ... The Vice-President of India is second behind the President in the Executive branch of the Government of India. ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the Government of India. ... A Chief Minister is the elected Head of Government of a state of India, a territory of Australia or a British overseas territory that has attained self-government. ... The Lok Sabha is the lower house in the Parliament of India. ... Executive President Vice-President Prime Minister Dy. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... The Indian Army is one of the armed forces of India and has responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Indian Navy is the naval branch of the armed forces of India. ... The Indian Air Force (भारतीय वायु सेना : Bharatiya Vayu Sena) is the air-arm of the Armed Forces of India and has the prime responsibility of conducting aerial warfare and securing the Indian airspace. ...


They may fly the flag on their cars, whenever they consider it necessary or advisable. The flag shall be flown from a staff, which should be affixed firmly either on the middle front of the bonnet or to the front right side of the car. When a foreign dignitary travels in a car provided by government, the flag should be flown on the right side of the car and the flag of the foreign country should be flown on the left side of the car.


The flag should be flown on the aircraft carrying the President, the Vice-President or the Prime Minister on a visit to a foreign country. Alongside the National Flag, the flag of the country visited should also be flown but, when the aircraft lands in countries en route, the national flags of the countries touched would be flown instead, as a gesture of courtesy and goodwill. When the President goes on tour within India, the flag should be displayed on the side by which the President will embark the aircraft or disembark from it. When the President travels by special train within the country, the flag should be flown from the driver’s cab on the side facing the platform of the station from where the train departs. The flag should be flown only when the special train is stationary or when coming into the station where it is going to halt.[2]


Half-mast

The flag should be flown at half-mast as a sign of mourning only on instructions from the president, who will also give a date ending the mourning period. When the flag is to be flown at half mast, it must first be raised to the top of the mast and then slowly lowered to half mast. Before being lowered at sunset or at the appropriate time, the flag is first raised to the top of the pole and then lowered. Only the Indian flag is flown half mast; all other flags remain at normal height. This does not cite any references or sources. ... Margaret of Spain, Empress of Austria, in Mourning, 1666; note the children and servants in mourning dress behind her. ...


The flag is flown at half-mast for the death of the President, Vice-President and Prime Minister all over India. For the Speaker of the Lok Sabha and the Chief Justice of The Supreme Court of India, it is flown in Delhi and for a Union Cabinet Minister it is flown in Delhi and the state capitals. For Minister of State, it is flown only in Delhi. For a Governor, Lt. Governor and Chief Minister of a state or union territory it is flown in the concerned state. The President of India (Hindi: Rashtrapati) is the head of state and first citizen of India and the Supreme Commander of the Indian armed forces. ... The Vice-President of India is second behind the President in the Executive branch of the Government of India. ... The Prime Minister of India is, in practice, the most powerful person in the Government of India. ... The Lok Sabha is the lower house in the Parliament of India. ... The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ... List of Indian ministers in the current government elected in 2004: Names in italics are women ministers. ...


If the intimation of the death of any dignitary is received in the afternoon, the flag shall be flown at half-mast on the following day also at the place or places indicated above, provided the funeral has not taken place before sun-rise on that day. On the day of the funeral of a dignitary mentioned above, the flag shall be flown at half-mast at the place of the funeral.


In the event of a half-mast day coinciding with the Republic Day, Independence Day, Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, National Week (6th to 13th April), any other particular day of national rejoicing as may be specified by the Government of India or in the case of a state, on the anniversary of formation of that state, flags are not permitted to be flown at half-mast except over the building where the body of the deceased is lying until such time it has been removed and that flag shall be raised to the full-mast position after the body has been removed. Republic Day is the name of a public holiday in several countries to commemorate the day when they first became republics. ... For other uses, see Independence Day (disambiguation). ... Gandhi, taken in 1931. ... The Government of India (Hindi: भारत सरकार [1]Bhārat Sarkār), officially referred to as the Union Government, and commonly as Central Government, was established by the Constitution of India, and is the governing authority of a federal union of 28 states and 7 union territories, collectively called the Republic of...


Observances of State mourning on the death of foreign dignitaries are governed by special instructions issued from the Ministry of Home Affairs (Home Ministry) in individual cases. However, in the event of death of either the Head of the State or Head of the Government of a foreign country, the Indian Mission accredited to that country may fly the national flag on the above mentioned days.


On occasions of state, military, central para-military forces funerals, the flag shall be draped over the bier or coffin with the saffron towards the head of the bier or coffin. The flag shall not be lowered into the grave or burnt in the pyre.[2] The crematorium at Haycombe Cemetery, Bath, England. ...


Disposal

When no longer in a fit condition to be used, a flag should be disposed of in a dignified manner, preferably by burning or ground burial.[2] For other uses, see Fire (disambiguation). ...


See also



This is a list of flags used in India. ... The Emblem of India The Emblem of India is an adaptation from the Sarnath Lion Capital of Ashoka. ... The Ashoka Chakra (Pronunced as Ashok Chakra, not Ashokaa Chakraa) is an ancient Indian depiction of the Wheel of Life and Cosmic Order (Sanskrit: Chakra, wheel. ... The Lion Capital of Ashoka is a sculpture of four lions standing back to back. ...

This is a gallery of international and national flags used in Asia. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Civil and state flag and ensign. ... The flag of the HKSAR Flag ratio: 2:3 The HKSAR and the PRC flags brandishing at the patio of the Legislative Council. ... Flag of Taiwan redirects here. ... Please see: North Korea: Flag of North Korea South Korea: Flag of South Korea Unification Flag This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Flag of North Korea was adopted on September 8, 1948, as the national flag and ensign. ... Taegukgi and Taegeukgi redirects here. ... State and military flag and ensign (obverse). ... Flag ratio: 1:2 Flag of Ceylon from 1948-1951 Flag of Ceylon between 1951 and 1972 The Flag of Sri Lanka, also called the Lion Flag, consists of gold lion passant, holding a sword in its right fore paw, in front of a crimson background with four golden bo... Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of East Timor was adopted in 2002. ... National flag and ensign. ... A transcontinental nation is a country belonging to more than one continent. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... This gallery of sovereign-state flags shows the flags of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview contains the flags of dependent territories. ... This overview contains the flags of self-proclaimed states that have declared their independence, exert control over (at least part of) the claimed territory and population, but have not been acknowledged as independent states by the international community at large. ... This gallery contains the flags of states that were (at least de facto) independent in the past. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... This gallery of sovereign state coats of arms shows the coat of arms of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview shows the coat of arms of dependent territories. ... This overview contains the coats of arms of self-proclaimed states that have declared their independence, exert control over (at least part of) the claimed territory and population, but have not been acknowledged as independent states by the international community at large. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Heimer, Željko (2006-07-02). India. Flags of the World. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Flag Code of India. Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India (2006-01-25). Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  3. ^ See discussion of the actual colours in section Design, this page.
  4. ^ a b National Flag of India. Funmunch.com. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  5. ^ a b c The National Flag. Indian National Congress (2004-06-16). Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  6. ^ a b c d Flag code of India, 2002. Fact Sheet. Press Information Bureau, Government of India (2002-04-04). Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  7. ^ a b c Vattam, Shyam Sundar. "Why all national flags will be ‘Made in Hubli’", Deccan Herald, 2004-06-15. Retrieved on 2006-10-11. 
  8. ^ a b Ganapati, Priya. "Dhanesh Bhatt: India's only licensed Tricolour maker", Rediff.com, 2002-01-25. Retrieved on 2006-10-11. 
  9. ^ Union of India vs. Navin Jindal. Supreme Court of India. Retrieved on July 1, 2005.
  10. ^ (2004) 2 SCC 510
  11. ^ Now wear the Indian tricolour, not below belt. Hindustan Times tabloid. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  12. ^ No national flag on underwear. Daily Times of Pakistan. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Indian National Flag Flag ratio: 2:3 The National Flag of India was adopted in its present form during an ad hoc meeting of the Constituent Assembly held on the 22 July 1947, a few days before Indias independence from the British on 15 August, 1947. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot of the Flags of the World website Flags of the World (or FOTW) is the Internets largest website devoted to vexillology, containing comprehensive information about all kinds of flags. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Furthur reading

  • Virmani, Arundhati (1999). "NATIONAL SYMBOLS UNDER COLONIAL DOMINATION: THE NATIONALIZATION OF THE INDIAN FLAG, MARCH–AUGUST 1923". Past and Present 164: 169–197. DOI:10.1093/past/164.1.169. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 

A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links LinkFA-star. ...


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