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Encyclopedia > Flag of England
Flag of England
Flag of England
Use Civil and state flag. Civil and state flag
Proportion 3:5[1]
Adopted 16th century
Design A centred red cross on a white background

The Flag of England is the St George's Cross. The red cross appeared as an emblem of England during the Middle Ages and the Crusades and is one of the earliest known emblems representing England. It achieved status as the national flag of England during the 16th century. Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... A civil flag is a version of the national flag that is flown by civilians on non-government installations or craft. ... The flags of the U.S. states exhibit a wide variety of regional influences and local histories, as well as widely different styles and design principles. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links FIAV_110000. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... St Georges cross The St Georges Cross is a red cross on a white background. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ...


Saint George became the patron saint of England in the 13th century, and the legend of Saint George slaying a dragon dates from the 12th century. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ...


The proportions of the flag are that the red cross has a width of 1/5 of the height of the flag.[1]

Contents

History

The exact origins of the Flag of England are unclear and there are multiple supporting theories, though it is known that the flag appeared during the Middle Ages. It has been recorded that the first known recorded use of the St George's Cross as an emblem (but not as a flag) of England was in a roll of account relating to the Welsh War of 1275.[1] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


The use of a red cross on a white background was a symbol of St. George in the Middle Ages. This is seen, for example, in the flag of Georgia, another nation with St George as patron saint. Flag ratio: 2:3 The official flag of Georgia is the five-cross flag, restored to official use on January 14, 2004 after a break of some 500 years. ...


One theory states that St. George's cross was originally the flag of Genoa and was adopted by England and the City of London in 1190 for their ships entering the Mediterranean to benefit from the protection of the powerful Genoese fleet. The maritime Republic of Genoa was rising and going to become, with its rival Venice, one of the most important powers in the world. The English Monarch paid an annual tribute to the Doge of Genoa for this privilege.[1] For other uses, see Genoa (disambiguation). ... The Republic of Genoa, in full the Most Serene Republic of Genoa (known as the Ligurian Republic from 1798 to 1805) was an independent state in Liguria on the northwestern Italian coast from ca. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholicism Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ...

St. George slaying the dragon, while holding the St. George's Cross
St. George slaying the dragon, while holding the St. George's Cross

A second theory states that the flag was adopted during the Crusades. At the beginning of the Crusades, St George's red cross on white was already associated with England. Although the Pope decided English crusaders would be distinguished by wearing a white cross on red, and French crusaders a red cross on white (Italian knights were allocated a yellow cross on a white background),[2] English knights soon decided to claim instead "their" cross of red on white, like the French. In January 1188, in a meeting between Henry II of England and Philip II of France, the two rivals agreed to exchange flags (France later changed its new white cross on red for a white cross on a dark blue flag).[3] Some French knights carried on using the red cross however, and as English knights wore this pattern as well, the red cross on white became the typical crusader symbol regardless of nationality.[4] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1498, 417 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dragon Saint George ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1498, 417 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dragon Saint George ... For alternate uses, see Saint George (disambiguation) Saint George on horseback rides alongside a wounded dragon being led by a princess, late 19th century engraving. ... The St Georges cross, a red cross on a white background, is the national flag of England and has been since about 1277. ... This article is about the medieval crusades. ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ... Philip II Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (21 August 1165 – 14 July 1223) was the King of France from 1180 until his death. ...


St George's cross may not have achieved the full status of national flag until the 16th century, when all other saints' banners were abandoned during the Reformation. Thereafter it became recognized as the flag of England and Wales. The earliest record of St George's flag at sea, as an English flag in conjunction with royal banners but no other saintly flags, was 1545.[1]


Incorporation into the Union Flag

The Flag of England is one of the key components of the Union Flag. The Union Flag has been used in a variety of forms since 1606,[5] when the flags of the Kingdom of Scotland and Kingdom of England were first merged to symbolise the Union of the Crowns.[6] (The Union of the Crowns having occurred in 1603). In Scotland, and in particular on Scottish vessles at sea, historical evidence suggests that a separate design of Union Flag was flown to that used in England.[7] However, following the Acts of Union of 1707, which united the Kingdom of Scotland and the Kingdom of England, the 'English' version of the Union Flag was adopted as the official flag of the unified Kingdom of Great Britain.[8] Union Jack redirects here. ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ...


From 1801, in order to symbolise the union of the Kingdom of Great Britain with the Kingdom of Ireland, a new design which included the St Patrick's Cross was adopted for the flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.[9] This new design, having remained unchanged following the partition of Ireland in 1921 and creation of the Irish Free State and Northern Ireland, continues to be used as the flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Saint Patricks Flag: a red saltire on a field of white The Saint Patricks Flag features a red saltire, a crux decussata (X-shaped cross), on a white field; representing Saint Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. ... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... The Partition of Ireland took place in May 1921, following the enactment in December 1920 of the Government of Ireland Act 1920, and was accepted in the ratification of the Anglo-Irish Treaty in January 1922 that ended the Anglo-Irish War and the union of the United Kingdom of... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article is about the prior state. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...

The Saint George's Cross, the Flag of England. United with England in the 16th century, this flag also represents Wales in the Union Flag

The Saint George's Cross, the Flag of England. United with England in the 16th century, this flag also represents Wales in the Union Flag
The 'Scotch' Union Flag may have seen limited use in Scotland from 1606 to 1707, following the Union of the Crowns.

The 'Scotch' Union Flag may have seen limited use in Scotland from 1606 to 1707, following the Union of the Crowns.
The Union Flag, 1606 (King's Colours), used mostly in England and, from 1707, the flag of the Kingdom of Great Britain.

The Union Flag, 1606 (King's Colours), used mostly in England and, from 1707, the flag of the Kingdom of Great Britain.
Union Flag used since 1801, incorporating the Cross of Saint Patrick, following the Act of Union between Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland.

Union Flag used since 1801, incorporating the Cross of Saint Patrick, following the Act of Union between Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland.

Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... This article is about the country. ... Union Jack redirects here. ... Image File history File links Union_Jack_1606_Scotland. ... Image File history File links Union_Jack_1606_Scotland. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Acts of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Union of the Crowns refers to the accession of James VI, King of Scots, to the thrones of England and Ireland, in March 1603. ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Image File history File links Union_flag_1606_(Kings_Colors). ... Events January 27 - The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators begins ending in their execution on January 31 May 17 - Supporters of Vasili Shusky invade the Kremlin and kill Premier Dmitri December 26 - Shakespeares King Lear performed in court Storm buries a village of St Ismails near... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... For an explanation of terms such as Scotland, Wales, England, (Great) Britain and United Kingdom, see British Isles (terminology). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... St Patrick redirects here, for other uses, see St. ... The phrase Act of Union 1800 (or sometimes Act of Union 1801) (Irish: Acht an Aontais 1800) is used to describe two complementary Acts[1] whose official United Kingdom titles are the Union with Ireland Act 1800 (1800 c. ... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ...

Usage in popular culture

English Rugby Supporter in the streets of Nantes, France in 2007
English Rugby Supporter in the streets of Nantes, France in 2007

In the past few years the Flag of St George has become increasingly used by the English, particularly at sports events. For example, when England won the football World Cup in 1966, most of the flags waved by supporters were Union Flags. Now they have largely been supplanted by the English flag. The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the mens national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the...


The flag is also seen during England Cricket matches. The flag is however seen mostly during the Cricket World Cup in matches where England plays. The flag is more importantly seen during The Ashes. Winning The Ashes is the pinnacle of English Pride and the flags are waved during the Tests whether in England by the home fans or in Australia by the Barmy Army. The Cricket World Cup is the premier international championship of mens One Day International (ODI) cricket. ... For other uses, see The Ashes (disambiguation). ... The Barmy Army chanting at the Sydney Cricket Ground The Barmy Army is an organised group of cricket fans which organises touring parties of its members to follow the English cricket team on all of its overseas tours. ...


Since 1996 the England flag has become more affiliated with supporters of the English football team. 27% of English adults having bought a flag during the 2006 World Cup.[10] First international Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... (Redirected from 2006 World Cup) The final stages of Football World Cup 2006 are scheduled to take place in Germany between 9 June and 9 July. ...


The England flag is also used in Rugby Union.[11] It is sometimes used on the web to indicate an English-speaking portion of a site.[12] This has the advantage of not choosing between the flags of the two major english-speaking countries (those of the USA and the UK). The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Despite this shift in the flag's popular connotations, many black people living in England view the flag with suspicion: During a poll of readers of New Nation, "most black people interviewed said they felt alienated by the flag of St George and still associated it with the BNP."[10] Despite this, some young, non-white people have been reported displaying the flags in support of the football team.[13] New Nation is a weekly newspaper published in the UK for the black minority. ... The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Outside England

See also: St George's Cross

Due to the spread of the British Empire, the flag of England is/was used on various flags and coats of arms of different countries, states and provinces throughout the world, which were once ruled by Britain, most notably seen today in several flags of the provinces and states of Canada and Australia respectively. St Georges cross The St Georges Cross is a red cross on a white background. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Heraldry is the science and art of describing of coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... This article describes a type of political entity. ... The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ... Province is a name for a secondary, or subnational entity of government in most countries. ... Province is a name for a secondary, or subnational entity of government in most countries. ... The term state may refer to: a sovereign political entity, see state unitary state nation state a non-sovereign political entity, see state (non-sovereign). ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_New_South_Wales. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The current state flag of New South Wales was officially adopted in 1876. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Alberta. ... Flag of Alberta The flag of Alberta, Canada was adopted on 1 June 1968. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ontario. ... Ontarios official flag since 1965 The current Flag of Ontario was proclaimed the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Montreal. ... The Flag of Montreal was first displayed in May 1939. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Manitoba. ... Manitobas official flag since 1965 The Flag of Manitoba is a variation of the Red Ensign which bears the shield of the provincial coat of arms. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Fiji. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of Fiji was adopted on October 10, 1970. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guernsey. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The Present flag of Guernsey was adopted in 1985 and consists of the red cross of St. ... Image File history File links British_East_India_Company_flag. ... Image File history File links British_East_India_Company_flag. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e England (United Kingdom); Flags of the World; (c.1996 - Present)
  2. ^ Crusader Cross Flags 1188; Flags of the World; (1999 - 2005)
  3. ^ Prof. J. Prawer, A history of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem (Hebrew, 3rd edition, vol. II, pp. 17-18)
  4. ^ Adventist Media Response and Conversation: Art and the Crusader's Flag
  5. ^ Royal Website
  6. ^ Flag Institute
  7. ^ Flags of the World
  8. ^ Act of Union (Article 1)
  9. ^ Flags of the World
  10. ^ a b Conn, David; Sour English stereotypes linger amid the flag-waving; The Guardian; 12 July 2006
  11. ^ England Rugby Football Union
  12. ^ Witness the bottom left corner of this website of wine reviews (in French)
  13. ^ Crampton, Robert; Dad, how come rich people don't fly flags and show they're patriotic?; The Times; 21 June 2006

Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ... Flags of the World (or FOTW) is an Internet-based vexillological organization and resource. ...

See also

The Coat of Arms of England The Coat of Arms of England is gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or armed & langued azure The Coat of Arms was introduced by King Richard I of England in the 1190s, apparently as a version of the arms of the Duchy of... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... This is a list of flags used exclusively in England. ... This is a list of flags used by and in the United Kingdom and related territories. ...

External links

  • Flag of England at FOTW
The list of unrecognized countries enumerates those geo-political entities which lack general diplomatic recognition, but wish to be recognized as sovereign states. ...  Southwest Asia in most contexts. ... The borders of the continents are the limits of the several continents of the Earth, as defined by various geographical, cultural, and political criteria. ...  The North American plate, shown in brown The North American Plate is a tectonic plate covering most of North America, extending eastward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and westward to the Cherskiy Range in East Siberia. ...  The African plate, shown in pinkish-orange The African Plate is a tectonic plate covering the continent of Africa and extending westward to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... This gallery of sovereign-state flags shows the flags of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview contains the flags of dependent territories. ... This article is intended as a list of flags from micronations - that is, unrecognised statelike entities that are largely or wholly ephemeral in nature. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... This gallery of sovereign state coats of arms shows the coat of arms of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This overview shows the coat of arms of dependent territories. ... This overview contains the coats of arms of self-proclaimed states that have declared their independence, exert control over (at least part of) the claimed territory and population, but have not been acknowledged as independent states by the international community at large. ... This overview contains the coats of arms of micronations, self-proclaimed statelike entities that are largely or wholly ephemeral in nature. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The history of England is similar to the history of Britain before the arrival of the Saxons. ... Prehistoric Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... Logres (also spelt Logris or Loegria) is another name for England in Arthurian legend. ... The History of Anglo-Saxon England covers the history of early medieval England from the end of Roman Britain and the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century until the Conquest by the Normans in 1066. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings and the events leading to it. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the early 16th century to the early 17th century. ... This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ... Elizabethan redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Jacobinism or Jacobitism. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ... The Georgian architecture of The Circus, Bath, built between 1754 and 1768 The Georgian era is a period of British history, normally defined as including the reigns of the kings George I, George II, George III and George IV, i. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... see also Politics of the United Kingdom This politics-related article is a stub. ... England under Queen Elizabeth Is reign, the Elizabethan Era, was ruled by the very structured and complicated Elizabethan government. ... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Gardens in England is a link page for any garden, botanical garden, arboretum or pinetum open to the public in England. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a link page for towns and cities in England. ... This is a list of civil parishes in England, the smallest level of local government, split by county. ... This article discusses the Demographics of England as presented by the United Kingdom Census in 2001. ... English is a West Germanic language originating in England. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Castles in England is a link page for any castle in England. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The logo of the England Cricket Team which shows the three Lions of England below a five-pointed crown The England cricket team is the national cricket team which represents England and Wales. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. ... Museums in England is a link page for any museum in England. ... First international (also the worlds first) Scotland 4–1 England (27 March 1871) Largest win England 134–0 Romania (17 November 2001) Worst defeat Australia 76–0 England (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... English inventions and discoveries are objects, processes or techniques which owe their existence either partially or entirely to a person born in England; in some cases, their Englishness is determined by the fact that they were brought into existence in England , by non-English people working in the country. ... English cuisine is shaped by the countrys temperate climate, its island geography and its history. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly referred to as Wimbledon, is the oldest major championship in tennis and is widely considered to be the most prestigious. ... This is a list of flags used exclusively in England. ... The Coat of Arms of England The Coat of Arms of England is gules, three lions passant guardant in pale or armed & langued azure The Coat of Arms was introduced by King Richard I of England in the 1190s, apparently as a version of the arms of the Duchy of... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... St. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
England (United Kingdom) (2907 words)
The cross of St George is the flag of England, not the Union Jack.
The official proportions for the national flag of England is 3:5, with the cross being 1/5 of the height of the flag wide.
Since you have red in both the field of the arms of England and the Scottish lion rampant, the claws of the three English lions passant gardant and of the Scottish lion are all blue.
England (324 words)
England (formerly the Kingdom of England up to its merger with Scotland in 1707, which created the Kingdom of Great Britain) is the largest and most densely populated of the nations that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
England comprises most of the southern half of the island of Great Britain, bordered to the north by Scotland and to the west by Wales.
According to the 2001 census the population of England was 49,138,831.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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