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Encyclopedia > Flag
The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use.
The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use.

A flag is a piece of cloth, often flown from a pole or mast, generally used symbolically for signalling or identification. The term flag is also used to refer to the graphic design employed by a flag, or to its depiction in another medium. Flag can mean: A flag is a piece of cloth that is usually colored. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1594 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of Denmark Portal:Denmark/Selected article/Archive Portal:Denmark/Selected article/2006 archive Portal:Denmark/Selected article/Week 17, 2006 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2848x2136, 1594 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Flag of Denmark Portal:Denmark/Selected article/Archive Portal:Denmark/Selected article/2006 archive Portal:Denmark/Selected article/Week 17, 2006 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... The Dannebrog. ... The flags of the U.S. states exhibit a wide variety of regional influences and local histories, as well as widely different styles and design principles. ... It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... mizzen mast, mainmast and foremast Grand Turk The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... Graphics are often utilitarian and anonymous,[1] as these pictographs from the US National Park Service illustrate. ...


The first flags were used to assist military coordination on battlefields and flags have evolved into a general tool for rudimentary signalling and identification, This was especially used in environments where communication is similarly challenging (such as the maritime environment where semaphore is used). National flags are potent patriotic symbols with varied wide-ranging interpretations, often including strong military associations due to their original and ongoing military uses. Flags are used in messaging, advertising, or for other decorative purposes. The study of flags is known as vexillology, from the Latin vexillum meaning flag or banner. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Advert redirects here. ... Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ...

Contents

History

Although flag-like symbols were used in some ancient cultures, the origin of flags in the modern sense is a matter of dispute. Some believe flags originated in China, while others hold that the Roman Empire's vexillum or the cyrus the great's standard (a hawk) were the first true flag and flags are also prominently been mentioned in the Indian epic of Mahabharata. Originally, the standards of the Roman legions were not flags, but symbols like the eagle of Augustus Caesar's Xth legion; this eagle would be placed on a staff for the standard-bearer to hold up during battle. But a military unit from Scythia had for a standard a dragon with a flexible tail which would move in the wind; the legions copied this; eventually all the legions had flexible standards — our modern-day flag. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The vexillum was a flag-like object used in the Classical Era of the Roman Empire. ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... Genera Accipiter Micronisus Melierax Urotriorchis Erythrotriorchis The term hawk refers to birds of prey in any of three senses: Strictly, to mean any of the species in the bird sub-family Accipitrinae in the genera Accipiter, Micronisus, Melierax, Urotriorchis, and Megatriorchis. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of... Genera Several, see below. ... Augustus Caesar Caesar Augustus (Latin: IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS)¹ (23 September 63 BC – 19 August AD 14), known earlier in his life as Gaius Octavius or Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus, was the first Roman Emperor and is traditionally considered the greatest. ... Legio X Fretensis (Latin: Tenth legion of the sea strait) was a Roman legion levied by Augustus in 41/40 BC to fight during the period of civil war that started the dissolution of the Roman Republic. ... Approximate extent of Scythia and Sarmatia in the 1st century BC (the orange background shows the spread of Eastern Iranian languages, among them Scytho-Sarmatian). ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wind (disambiguation). ...


During the Middle Ages, flags were used mainly during battles to identify individual leaders: in Europe the knights, in Japan the samurai, and in China the generals under the imperial army. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The silver Anglia knight, commissioned as a trophy in 1850, intended to represent the Black Prince. ... For other uses, see Samurai (disambiguation). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


From the time of Christopher Columbus onwards, it has been customary (and later a legal requirement) for ships to carry flags designating their nationality;[1] these flags eventually evolved into the national flags and maritime flags of today. Flags also became the preferred means of communications at sea, resulting in various systems of flag signals; see International maritime signal flags. Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... A Maritime flag or Naval Jack is a national flag used exclusively on boats and other watercraft. ... The system of international maritime signal flags is a way of representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. ...


As European knights were replaced by centralized armies, flags became the means to identify not just nationalities but also individual military units. Flags became objects to be captured or defended. Eventually these flags posed too much danger to those carrying them, and by World War I these were withdrawn from the battlefields, and have since been used only at ceremonial occasions. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


National flags

Main article: National flag
Many flags are displayed in the Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra
Many flags are displayed in the Parliamentary Triangle, Canberra

One of the most popular uses of a flag is to symbolize a nation or country. Some national flags have been particularly inspirational to other nations, countries, or subnational entities in the design of their own flags. Some prominent examples include: The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 420 KB) Telstra Tower and world flags File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Flag ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 420 KB) Telstra Tower and world flags File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Flag ... The Parliamentary Triangle is the ceremonial precinct of Canberra and contains the Parliament (which also houses the executive branch and the High Court of Australia. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Country (disambiguation). ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ...

French "tricolore"
French "tricolore"

National flag designs are often used to signify nationality in other forms, such as flag patches. The Dannebrog. ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... The Dannebrog. ... The Nordic flags. ... Political map of the Nordic countries and associated territories. ... Flag of Ã…land The flag of Ã…land points to the location of the islands - it is the Swedish flag with an additional red cross symbolising Finland. ... Flag of Scania. ... “Union Jack” redirects here. ... Manitobas official flag since 1965 The Flag of Manitoba is a variation of the Red Ensign which bears the shield of the provincial coat of arms. ... Ontarios official flag since 1965 The current Flag of Ontario was proclaimed the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. ... Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii Ka Hae Hawaii, or the Flag of Hawaii, is the official standard symbolizing Hawaii as a kingdom (under a short British annexation), protectorate, republic, territory and state. ... Flag ratio: 2:3 The national flag of the Netherlands, with its three equal horizontal bands coloured red (top), white and blue is the oldest tricolour still in use today. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... This article is about the color. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... mirrored version of Image:Tricolore flagpole. ... mirrored version of Image:Tricolore flagpole. ... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ... Union Jack. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Flag of Brittany. ... Flag of the Russian Federation. ... The Pan-Slavic colours, red, blue and white, are colours used on the flags of most Slavic states and peoples. ... Distribution of Slavic people by language The Slavic peoples are a linguistic and ethnic branch of Indo-European peoples, living mainly in Europe, where they constitute roughly a third of the population. ... The flag of Serbia is a tricolour with Pan-Slavic colours, with three equal horizontal fields, red on the top, blue in the middle and white on the bottom, and the Coat of Arms of Serbia centered vertically and located left of center by one-seventh of the flags... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... the first thing that was invented was the automatic DILDO. Education grew explosively because of a very strong demand for high school and college education. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The old flag, which was used from 1975 to 1987 and 1991 to 1996, and is still seen occasionally today. ... African coutries using Pan-African colours in their flags, shown in red. ... The flag of Turkey consists of a white crescent moon and a star on a red background. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... TRNC Flag The flag of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus is the Turkish flag, except that the colors of the objects and background are reversed, and the white background also has two red stripes at the top and bottom. ... Red, black, and white, sometimes with green, are the Pan-Arab colors and have their origins in the flag of the Arab Revolt. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... Combatants Hashemite Arabs Great Britain Ottoman Empire Commanders Faisal T.E. Lawrence Ahmed Djemal Strength 5,000 (?) 25,000 (?) This article is about the Arab Revolt of 1916. ... Proportions 1:2 The Palestinian flag has been in use by Palestinians to represent their national aspirations since the middle of the 20th century. ... The first official flag of the Soviet Union was adopted in July of 1923. ... For other uses, see Hammer and sickle (disambiguation). ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Flag ratio: 3:5 From the establishment of East Germany in 1949 to 1959, the flag of East Germany was the same as the Flag of West Germany, and the current Flag of Germany. ... New 8-star Flag of Venezuela Flag ratio: 2:3 New 8-star Flag of Venezuela Flag ratio: 2:3, civil/merchant variant Old 7-star Flag of Venezuela. ... Francisco de Miranda Sebastián Francisco de Miranda Rodríguez (commonly known as Francisco de Miranda March 28, 1750 – July 14, 1816) was a South American revolutionary whose own plan for the independence of the Spanish American colonies failed, but who is regarded as a forerunner of Simón Bol... Capital Bogotá Created 1819 Dissolved 1830 Demonym Colombian Departments of the Republic Great Colombia, officially the Republic of Colombia, was a short-lived republic in South America consisting of present-day Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Panama. ... A yellow Tulip. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... “Flag of Argentina” redirects here. ... Manuel Belgrano (June 3, 1770 – June 20, 1820) was an Argentine lawyer, politician, and military leader, born in Buenos Aires. ... Capital Guatemala City; in 1834 moved to San Salvador Created 1823 Dissolved 1840 Demonym Centroamerican The United Provinces of Central America (UPCA) was a country that existed in Central America from July 1823 to approximately 1840. ... An Italian flag Patch. ...


Civil flags

Main article: Civil flag

A civil flag is a version of the national flag that is flown by civilians on non-government installations or craft. The use of civil flags was more common in the past, in order to denote buildings or ships that were not manned by the military. In some countries the civil flag is the same as the war flag or state flag, but without the coat of arms, such as in the case of Spain, and in others it is an alteration of the war flag. A civil flag is a version of the national flag that is flown by civilians on non-government installations or craft. ... A war flag (or military flag) is a variant of a national flag for use by the nations military forces on land. ... The flags of the U.S. states exhibit a wide variety of regional influences and local histories, as well as widely different styles and design principles. ...


War flags

Main article: War flag
Standing for the UK's Royal Air Force, the RAF Ensign displays the famous RAF roundel
Standing for the UK's Royal Air Force, the RAF Ensign displays the famous RAF roundel
German troops after surrendering to the U.S. Third Army in WW2. The first soldier carries a white flag.

Several countries (including the United Kingdom and the former Nazi Germany) have unique flags flown by their armed forces, rather than the national flag. A war flag (or military flag) is a variant of a national flag for use by the nations military forces on land. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Royal Air Force Ensign The Royal Air Force Ensign is the official flag which used to represent the Royal Air Force. ... The modern proportion RAF roundel A roundel in heraldry is any circular shape; in military use it is an emblem of nationality employed on military aircraft and air force flags, generally round and consisting of concentric rings of different colors. ... WW2 photo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... WW2 photo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ... The Dannebrog, national flag of Denmark, is the oldest state flag still in use. ...


Other countries' armed forces (such as those of the United States or Switzerland) use their standard national flag. The Philippines' armed forces may use their standard national flag, but during times of war the flag is turned upside down. These are also considered war flags, though the terminology only applies to the flag's military usage.


Large versions of the war flag flown on the warships of countries' navies are known as battle ensigns. In war waving a white flag indicates surrender. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the color. ...


Flags at sea

Main article: Maritime flag
The international maritime signal flag Delta (letter D)
The international maritime signal flag Delta (letter D)

Flags are particularly important at sea, where they can mean the difference between life and death, and consequently where the rules and regulations for the flying of flags are strictly enforced. A national flag flown at sea is known as an ensign. A courteous, peaceable merchant ship or yacht customarily flies its ensign (in the usual ensign position), together with the flag of whatever nation it is currently visiting at the mast (known as a courtesy flag). To fly one's ensign alone in foreign waters, a foreign port or in the face of a foreign warship traditionally indicates a willingness to fight, with cannon, for the right to do so. As of 2006, this custom is still taken seriously by many naval and port authorities and is readily enforced in many parts of the world by boarding, confiscation and other civil penalties. A maritime flag is a flag designated for use on boats and other watercraft. ... Image File history File links ICS_Delta. ... Image File history File links ICS_Delta. ... Ensign of the Imperial Japanese Navy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Merchant Marine. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... A courtesy flag (or courtesy ensign) is flown by a ship in foreign waters as a token of respect. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In some countries yacht ensigns are different from merchant ensigns in order to signal that the yacht is not carrying cargo that requires a customs declaration. Carrying commercial cargo on a boat with a yacht ensign is deemed to be smuggling in many jurisdictions. This article is about transported goods. ... Customs is an authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting customs duties and for controlling the flow of animals and goods (including personal effects and hazardous items) in and out of a country. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


There is a system of international maritime signal flags for numerals and letters of the alphabet. Each flag or pennant has a specific meaning when flown individually. The system of international maritime signal flags is a way of representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. ...


As well, semaphore flags can be used to communicate on an ad hoc basis from ship to ship over short distances. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Shape and design

Flags are usually rectangular in shape (often in the ratio 2:3 or 3:5), but may be of any shape or size that is practical for flying, including square, triangular, or swallow tailed. A more unusual flag shape is that of the flag of Nepal, which is in the shape of two stacked triangles. This is a gallery of flags arranged by design. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nepal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nepal. ... Flag ratio: 4:3 The national flag of Nepal is the only non-quadrangular national flag, and one of only two non-rectangular official jurisdictional flags in the world (the other is the flag of Ohio). ... Flag ratio: 4:3 The national flag of Nepal is the only non-quadrangular national flag, and one of only two non-rectangular official jurisdictional flags in the world (the other is the flag of Ohio). ...


Many flag merchants prey on unwary buyers by offering incorrect flags, such as with the wrong proportions, crudely drawn, or one-sided. Some reference materials alter the flag proportions so they look uniform, such as decades of editions of the annual World Almanac and Book of Facts. The World Almanac and Book of Facts is a well-known American published reference work which conveys information to the general public about such subjects as world changes, tragedies, sports feats, etc. ...


Many flags are dyed through and through to be inexpensive to manufacture, such that the reverse side is the mirror image of the obverse (front) side. This presents two possibilities: An image may be through and through in the following cases: ink or paint penetrating to the other side inlaying with another material, stained glass, patchwork, woodwork, linoleum, marble, etc. ... A mirror image is a mirror based duplicate of a single image. ...

  1. If the design is symmetrical in an axis parallel to the flag pole, obverse and reverse will be identical despite the mirror-reversal.
  2. If not, the obverse and reverse will present two variants of the same design, one with the hoist on the left, the other with the hoist on the right. This is very common and usually not disturbing if there is no text in the design.

Some complex flag designs are not intended for through and through implementation, requiring separate obverse and reverse sides if made correctly. In these cases there is a design element (usually text) which is not symmetric and should be read in the same direction, regardless of whether the hoist is to the viewer's left or right. These cases can be divided into two types: Symmetry is a characteristic of geometrical shapes, equations and other objects; we say that such an object is symmetric with respect to a given operation if this operation, when applied to the object, does not appear to change it. ...

  1. The same (asymmetric) design may be duplicated on both sides. Such flags can be manufactured by creating two identical through and through flags and then sewing them back to back, though this can affect the resulting combination's responsiveness to the wind. Depictions of such flags may be marked with the symbol , indicating the reverse is congruent to (rather than a mirror image of) the obverse.
  2. Rarely, the reverse design may differ, in whole or in part, from that of the obverse. Examples are the national flag of Paraguay, the flag of the U.S. state of Oregon, and the historical national flag of the Soviet Union. Depictions of such flags may be marked with the symbol Image:IFIS Two-sided.png.

Common designs on flags include crosses, stripes, and divisions of the surface, or field, into bands or quarters — patterns and principles mainly derived from heraldry. A heraldic coat of arms may also be flown as a banner of arms, as is done on both the state flag of Maryland and the flag of Kiribati. Image File history File links IFIS_Equal. ... Flag of Paraguay (obverse). ... Oregon flag (obverse) Oregon flag (reverse) The flag of Oregon a blue field on which are placed, on the obverse, the Seal of Oregon (supported by thirty-three stars, representing its order in joining the United States); the words STATE OF OREGON above; and the year of statehood, 1859, below. ... Soviet Flag: 1:4 ratio July 1923-November 13, 1923 The first official flag of the Soviet Union was adopted in December of 1922 at the First Congress of Soviets of the USSR. It was agreed that the red banner was transformed from the symbol of the Party to the... Image File history File links IFIS_Two-sided. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kiribati. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kiribati. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The Flag of Kiribati: the upper half is red with a gold frigatebird (Fregata minor, in Gilbertese: te eitei) flying over a gold rising sun (otintaai), and the lower half is blue with three horizontal wavy white stripes to represent the ocean and the 3 groups... Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ... Flag of Maryland The flag of Maryland consists of the heraldic banners of the family of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The Flag of Kiribati: the upper half is red with a gold frigatebird (Fregata minor, in Gilbertese: te eitei) flying over a gold rising sun (otintaai), and the lower half is blue with three horizontal wavy white stripes to represent the ocean and the 3 groups...


The flag of Libya, which consists of a rectangular field of green, is the only national flag using a single color and no design or insignia. Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of Libya (adopted on November 11, 1977) consists of a simple green field with no other characteristics. ...


The Flag of the Philippines, originally the blue part is always superior to the red part...if you switch the color(placing red on top) it indicates that the country is at war. The only flag to possess that feature. Bandila redirects here. ...

Flag of Philippines
Flag of Philippines
Name National Flag
Variant flag of Philippines
Design Switch the color of the Stripes to declare a State under War.

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... This is an incomplete list of names used for specific flags, either as officially designated titles or traditional nicknames. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Religious flags

Flags can play many different roles in religion. In Buddhism, prayer flags are used, usually in sets of five differently colored flags. Many national flags and other flags include religious symbols such as the cross, the crescent, or a reference to a patron saint. Flags are also adopted by religious groups and flags such as the Jain flag and the Christian flag are used to represent a whole religion. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jain - Five Coloured Flag The flag of Jainism has five colours: White, Red, Orange, Green and Dark Blue (or Black). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jain - Five Coloured Flag The flag of Jainism has five colours: White, Red, Orange, Green and Dark Blue (or Black). ... The Christian Flag The Christian Flag is a flag designed to represent all of Christianity (see also Christendom), but flown mainly by Protestant churches in North America, Africa, and Latin America. ...


In sports

Flags flown on a beach.
Flags flown on a beach.

Because of their ease of signalling and identification, flags are often used in sports. Flags on the beach in Napier, New Zealand. ... Flags on the beach in Napier, New Zealand. ...

  • In American and Canadian football, referees use flags to indicate an error has been made in game play. The phrase used for such an indication is flag on the play. The flag itself is a small, weighted handkerchief, tossed on the field at the approximate point of the infraction; the intent is usually to sort out the details after the current play from scrimmage has concluded. In American football, the flag is usually yellow; in Canadian football, it is usually red.
  • In yacht racing, flags are used to communicate information from the race committee boat to the racers. Different flags hoisted from the committee boat may communicate a false start, changes in the course, a canceled race, or other important information. Racing boats themselves may also use flags to symbolize a protest or distress. The flags are often part of the nautical alphabetic system of International maritime signal flags, in which 26 different flags designate the 26 letters of the Latin alphabet.
  • In auto and motorcycle racing, racing flags are used to communicate with drivers. Most famously, a checkered flag of black and white indicates the end of the race, and victory for the leader. A yellow flag is used to indicate caution requiring slow speed and a red flag requires racers to stop immediately. A black flag is used to indicate penalties.
  • In Association football (soccer), linesmen carry small flags along the touch lines. They use the flags to indicate to the referee potential infringements of the laws, or who is entitled to possession of the ball that has gone out of the field of play, or, most famously, raise the flag overhead to indicate an offside offence. Officials called touch judges use flags for similar purposes in both codes of rugby.
  • In addition, fans of almost all sports wave flags in the stands to indicate their support for the participants. Many sports teams have their own flags, and, in individual sports, fans will indicate their support for a player by waving the flag of his or her home country.
  • Capture the flag is a popular children's sport.
  • In Gaelic football and Hurling a green flag is use to indicate a goal while a white flag is used to indicate a point
  • In Australian rules football, the goal umpire will wave two flags to indicate a goal and a single flag to indicate a point.
  • For safety, dive flags indicate the locations of underwater scuba divers.
  • In water sports such as Wakeboarding and Water-Skiing, an orange flag is held in between runs to indicate someone is in the water.

Diagram of a Canadian football field. ... A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ... The system of international maritime signal flags is a way of representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. ... A Peugeot 206 World Rally Car Motor racing and Motorsports redirect here. ... // Classic Road Racing Road Racing on (temporary closed) public roads Motorcycle sport is a broad field that encompasses all sporting aspects of motorcycling. ... The flagman displaying the checkered flag with a complete set of stockcar racing flags Racing flags are traditionally used in auto racing and similar motorsports to communicate important messages to drivers. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... In Association Football (Soccer), two Assistant Referees (previously known as linesmen) assist the Referee in controlling the match in accordance with the Laws of the Game. ... A referee presides over a game of association football (soccer). ... Offside is a rule in association football (soccer) which effectively limits how far forward attacking players may be when involved in play. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Capture the flag (disambiguation). ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... High marking is a key skill and spectacular attribute of Australian rules football Precise field and goal kicking using the oval shaped ball is the key skill in Australian rules football Australian rules football, also known as Australian football, Aussie rules, or simply football or footy is a code of... A goal umpire signalling a goal with two white flags, and a field umpire. ... Here is a glossary of scuba diving terms: // AGE  arterial gas embolism is a condition that can be caused by a diving accident in which a gas expands due to too rapid ascent, and a bubble and blocks the arterial flow of blood. ... Scuba diving is swimming underwater while using self-contained breathing equipment. ...

Swimming flags

Open swimming area
Open swimming area
Closed swimming area
Closed swimming area

In Australia, New Zealand, Philippines, and the United Kingdom a pair of red/yellow flags is used to mark the limits of the bathing area on a beach, usually guarded by surf lifesavers. If the beach is closed, the poles of the flags are crossed. The flags are colored with a red triangle and a yellow triangle making a rectangular flag, or a red rectangle over a yellow rectangle. On many Australian beaches there is a slight variation with beach condition signalling. A red flag signifies a closed beach (or, in the UK, some other danger), yellow signifies strong current or difficult swimming conditions, and green represents a beach safe for general swimming. In Ireland, a red and yellow flag indicates that it is safe to swim; a red flag that it is unsafe; and no flag indicates that there are no lifeguards on duty. Blue flags may also be used away from the yellow-red lifesaver area to designate a zone for surfboarding and other small, non-motorised watercraft. Image File history File links Flags_-_swim_between_the. ... Image File history File links Flags_-_swim_between_the. ... Image File history File links Flags_crossed_-_do_not_swim. ... Image File history File links Flags_crossed_-_do_not_swim. ... Surf Ski Carnival in Alexandra Heads. ...


Reasons for closing the beach include:

  • no lifeguards in attendance
  • waves too strong
  • dangerous rip
  • sharks
  • tsunami
  • hurricane warning

A surf flag exists, divided into four quadrants. The top left and bottom right quadrants are black, and the remaining area is white.


Signal flag "India" (a black circle on a yellow square) is frequently used to denote a "blackball" zone where surfboards cannot be used but other water activities are permitted. The system of international maritime signal flags is a way of representing individual letters of the alphabet in signals to or from ships. ...


Railway flags

Railways use a number of colored flags. When used as wayside signals they usually use the following meanings (exact meanings are set by the individual railroad company):

  • red = stop
  • yellow = proceed with care
  • green or white or blue = proceed.
  • a flag of any color waved vigorously means stop
  • A blue flag on the side of a locomotive means that it should not be moved because someone is working on it (or on the train attached to it). A blue flag on a track means that nothing on that track should be moved. The flag can only be removed by the person or group that placed it.

At night, the flags are replaced with lanterns showing the same colors.


Flags displayed on the front of a moving locomotive are an acceptable replacement for classification lights and usually have the following meanings (exact meanings are set by the individual railroad company):

  • white = extra (not on the timetable)
  • green = another section following
  • red = last section

Additionally, a railroad brakeman will typically carry a red flag to make his or her hand signals more visible to the engineer. Railway signals are a development of railway flags.[2] A signal is a mechanical or electrical device that indicates to train drivers or engineers information about the state of the line ahead, and therefore whether he or she must stop or may proceed, or instructions on what speed the train may go. ...


In politics

The Rainbow flag of the LGBT social movement.
The Rainbow flag of the LGBT social movement.

Social and political movements have adopted flags, to increase their visibility and as a unifying symbol. Image File history File links Gay_flag. ... Image File history File links Gay_flag. ...


The socialist movement uses red flags to represent their cause. The anarchism movement has a variety of different flags, but the primary flag associated with them is the black flag. In the 1970s, the rainbow flag was adopted as a symbol of the LGBT social movements. Bisexual and transgender pride flags were later designed, in an attempt to emulate the rainbow flag's success. Some of these political flags have become national flags; such as the red flag of the Soviet Union and national socialist banners for Nazi Germany. Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Historically, and most generally, the red flag is an international symbol for the blood of angry workers. ... Anarchism is a generic term describing various political philosophies and social movements that advocate the elimination of hierarchy and imposed authority. ... This article discusses various anarchist symbols, including the circle-A and the black flag. ... Six color rainbow gay pride flag flying over the Castro gay village in San Francisco, June 2005 The six colors of the most common gay pride flag. ... LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      LGBT social movements share related goals of social acceptance of homosexuality, bisexuality, or transgenderism. ... Bisexual pride flag The bisexual pride flag is a flag design representing the bisexual community. ... Transgender Pride flag The Transgender Pride flag was designed by Monica Helms, and was first shown at a pride parade in Phoenix, Arizona, USA in 2000. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


Flagpoles

The world's tallest flagpole (160 m (525 feet)), over Kijŏng-dong, near Panmunjeom, North Korea

A flagpole or flagstaff can be a simple support made of wood or metal. If it is taller than can be easily reached to raise the flag, a cord is used, looping around a pulley at the top of the pole with the ends tied at the bottom. The flag is fixed to one lower end of the cord, and is then raised by pulling on the other end. The cord is then tightened and tied to the pole at the bottom. The pole is usually topped by a flat plate called a "truck" (originally meant to keep a wooden pole from splitting) or by a ball or a finial in a more complex shape. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1728 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Panmunjeom in Gyeonggi province is a village on the de facto border between North and South Korea, where the 1953 armistice that halted the Korean War was signed. ... Finial at Aachen town hall Illustration by Viollet-le-Duc, 1856 The finial is an architectural device, typically carved in stone and employed to decoratively emphasise the apex of a gable, or any of various distinctive ornaments at the top, end, or corner of a building or structure. ...

The Aqaba Flagpole, the tallest free-standing flagpole

Very high flagpoles may require more complex support structures than a simple pole, such as guy wires, or need be built as a mast. The highest flagpole in the world, at 160 metres (525 feet), is that at Gijeong-dong in North Korea, the flag weighing about 270 kilograms (600 pounds) when dry.[3] The world's biggest regularly hoisted flag, however, is the Brazilian national flag flown in the Square of the Three Powers in Brasilia, the capital of Brazil. This flag weighs about 600 kilograms (1300 pounds) when dry and measures 70×100 metres (230x330 feet). It can be seen from all parts of Brasilia and its flagpole is the tallest structure in the city. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1030x916, 139 KB) (user:bnwwf91) I took this photo of the Aqaba flagpole while on a boat in the The Gulf of Eilat(Aqaba) near Eilat, Israel and Aqaba, Jordan I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1030x916, 139 KB) (user:bnwwf91) I took this photo of the Aqaba flagpole while on a boat in the The Gulf of Eilat(Aqaba) near Eilat, Israel and Aqaba, Jordan I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the... For Panmunjom or Joint Security Area, see Joint Security Area. ... Bras lia is the capital city of Brazil and is located in the center of the country in a federal district created in the state of Goi s. ...


The tallest free-standing flagpole in the world is the Aqaba Flagpole in Aqaba, Jordan, with a total height of 132 meters (430 feet). The Raghadan Flagpole, also in Jordan, is the second tallest free-standing flagpole in the world. It reaches a height of 126 meters (410 feet) and hoists a flag that measures 60 by 40 meters (200 by 130 feet); it is illuminated at night and can be seen from 25 km (16 miles) away. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aqaba (Arabic: العقبة al-ʻAqabah) is a coastal town with a population of 101,290 (2000) and 2% of Jordans population in the far south of Jordan (). It is the capital of Aqaba Governorate. ... The Raghadan Flagpole is a 126. ...


Design

Flagpoles can be designed in one piece with a taper (typically a cone taper or a Venetian/Greek entasis taper),[4] or be made from multiple pieces to make them able to expand. In the United States, ANSI/NAAMM guide specification FP-1001-97 covers the engineering design of metal flagpoles to ensure safety. Venetia is a name used mostly in a historical context for the area of north-eastern Italy formerly under the control of the Republic of Venice and corresponding approximately to the present-day Italian administrative regions of the Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia. ... schema of a Corinthian column In architecture, entasis is a design technique used to counteract a certain optical illusion. ...


See also

Lists and galleries of flags
Notable flag-related topics
Miscellaneous

This is a gallery of flags arranged by design. ... This is a gallery of pairs (or larger groupings) of flags that exhibit such similarity in design that they can be difficult to distinguish. ... This is a redirect page for flag galleries. ... This gallery of sovereign state flags shows the flags of sovereign states in the list of sovereign states. ... This is an incomplete list of names used for specific flags, either as officially designated titles or traditional nicknames. ... Unofficial flags are either (a) flags in regular use that have no official status or (b) flag concepts that have appeared in various publications. ... An Italian flag Patch. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Burning the Flag of the United States Flag desecration is a blanket term applied to various acts that intentionally deface a flag, most often a national flag (though other flags can be defaced as well). ... Flag etiquette is a set of customs and practices that are used to determine the way that flags are flown in order to accord respect towards the regions, nations, or international organisations that the flags represent. ... The design and description of flags typically uses specialised flag terminology with precise and technical meanings, and is hence a form of jargon. ... The art of flag throwing dates back to the medieval guilds. ... In the legal discussions of municipalities in the United States, a flagpole annexation is a type annexation by a city, town or other municipality entity in which the entity acquires new territory that is not broadly contiguous to the existing territory, but connected to it by a thin right-of... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States as represented by its national flag. ... A standard-bearer is a person (soldier or civilian) who bears an emblem called an ensign or standard, i. ... Flag of the Fédération internationale des associations vexillologiques. ... Wingdings version of the Jolly Roger (character N). Many pirates created their own individualized versions. ... This footprint carved into the rock on Dunadd, in Argyll, is linked to the crowning of the Scots kings of Dál Riata. ...

References

  • William G. Crampton; The World of Flags; Rand McNally; ISBN 0-528-83720-6 (hardcover, 1994).
  • Ultimate Pocket Flags of the World; Dorling Kindersley; ISBN 0-7894-2085-6; (1st American edition, hardcover, 1996).

Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Dorling Kindersley (DK) is an international publishing company specialising in reference books for adults and children. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ...

Notes

  1. ^ articles 90-94 of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea
  2. ^ Calvert, J.B. (2004-07-25). Early Railway Signals. University of Denver. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  3. ^ Korea's DMZ: Scariest place on Earth February 20, 2002 http://edition.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/asiapcf/east/02/19/koreas.dmz/
  4. ^ [1]

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Flag Rules and Regulations (0 words)
When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street.
When the flag of the United States is displayed from a staff projecting horizontally or at an angle from the window sill, balcony, or front of a building, the union of the flag should be placed at the peak of the staff unless the flag is at half-staff.
The flag of the United States of America should be at the center and at the highest point of the group when a number of flags of States or localities or pennants of societies are grouped and displayed from staffs.
Flag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3077 words)
Flags are also used in messaging or advertising, or for decorative purposes, though at this less formal end the distinction between a flag and a simple cloth banner is blurred.
The flag of Argentina, created by Manuel Belgrano during the war of independence, was the inspiration for the United Provinces of Central America's flag, which in turn was the origin for the flags of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua.
They use the flags to indicate to the referee potential infringements of the laws, or who is entitled to possession of the ball that has gone out of the field of play, or, most famously, raise the flag overhead to indicate an offside offence.
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