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Encyclopedia > Five kings of Wa

The five kings of Wa are kings of Japan who sent envoys to China during the 5th century to strengthen the legitimacy of their claims to power by gaining the recognition of the Chinese emperor. Details about them are unknown. According to written records in China, their names were San, Chin, Sai, Kō and Bu. Ideogram for Wa, formed by the radical for person (on the left), and the phonetic element Wa on the right (itself represented by a rice plant in the upper part and a woman in the lower part). ... // Overview Events Romulus Augustus, Last Western Roman Emperor 410: Rome sacked by Visigoths 452: Pope Leo I allegedly meets personally with Attila the Hun and convinces him not to sack Rome 439: Vandals conquer Carthage At some point after 440, the Anglo-Saxons settle in Britain. ...


As the name of kings recorded are very much different from the names of emperors in Nihonshoki, specifying which emperor was the one recorded in Chinese history is under longtime dispute unsolved for centuries. Most contemporary historians assign the five Japanese kings to the following emperors (two possibilities are identified for Kings San and Chin), mostly based on the individual features of their genealogies reported in the Chinese sources. On the other hand, archeological evidence, such as an inscription found from swords of this age also supports the idea that Bu is an equivalent of Emperor Yūryaku who was called Wakatakeru Okimi at his age. Nihonshoki (Japanese: 日本書紀), sometimes translated as Chronicles of Japan, is the second oldest book of classical Japanese history. ...

Since Bu is most likely to be Yūryaku, Kō, who is said to be Bu's older brother, is likely to be an equivalent of Ankō who also noted in Nihonshoki as an elder brother to Yūryaku. However, Book of Song records Kō as "Crown Prince Kō", there is a possibility that he is not Ankō, but is Kinashi Karu no Miko, who was a crown prince of Ingyō. Daisen-Kofun, the tomb of Emperor Nintoku, Osaka Emperor Nintoku (仁徳天皇 Nintoku Tennō) was the 16th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor RichÅ« (履中天皇 RichÅ« Tennō) was the 17th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor Hanzei (反正天皇 Hanzei Tennō) was the 18th Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor Ingyō (允恭天皇 Ingyō Tennō) was the 19th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor Ankō (安康天皇 Ankō Tennō) was the 20th imperial ruler of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. ... Emperor YÅ«ryaku (雄略天皇 YÅ«rayku Tennō, c. ...


Some suspect that they were rulers of a Non-Yamato court which ruled the majority of current Japan in 5th century and eventually ruined by the ancestors of current imperial dynasty. However, such idea is not widely accepted among scholars.


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